The Student Room Group

Should I fill out my religion on the UCAS form?

I am privately an ex muslim, and no longer view myself as part of the religion. However, my parents have no idea, and are pressuring me to fill in 'muslim' on my UCAS form for the diversifying information section. They say this will make me more likely to get into Oxford university and increases my chances of getting en-suite accomodation. I am really not comfortable with filling in this information as I do not identify as muslim and wanted university to be my fresh start (without my parents knowing). Is there any advantage to putting the religion onto the UCAS form to increase my chances of Oxford admission, or should I secretly put the 'I prefer not to say option'? Please help me!
Original post by Anonymous
I am privately an ex muslim, and no longer view myself as part of the religion. However, my parents have no idea, and are pressuring me to fill in 'muslim' on my UCAS form for the diversifying information section. They say this will make me more likely to get into Oxford university and increases my chances of getting en-suite accomodation. I am really not comfortable with filling in this information as I do not identify as muslim and wanted university to be my fresh start (without my parents knowing). Is there any advantage to putting the religion onto the UCAS form to increase my chances of Oxford admission, or should I secretly put the 'I prefer not to say option'? Please help me!


It won't make any difference to the admissions process and it won't make any difference to life at Oxford, where you can call yourself what you want. I'd accede to your parents wishes if that's important to them. It's a tick box on a form, not a genuine stand on your belief system.
Reply 2
UCAS privacy policy says this 'It’s up to you if you give details about your ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender identity, and religious belief this will help providers check their compliance with the Equality Act 2010. This information is provided to your chosen provider after you’ve secured your place, or at the end of the application cycle.' so I doubt it will make any difference to your application as it seems they don't get that information until the admissions cycle is over. And as far as I know, when Oxford considers contextual factors in making offers it is specifically as it relates to education (so they consider things like your school quality and progression to HE, your neighbourhood socioeconomic status, whether you were on free school meals, spent time in care etc), so your religion is unlikely to be relevant in this regard.
Who told you parents that it gives you a better chance of getting in

When did they find out about diversity quotas :biggrin::biggrin::biggrin:

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