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Applying to oxford law after A-level results

Hi, this is kind of a random one but i’m feeling kind of lost right now trying to figure this all out on my own, and would really appreciate some help.
I’m currently in year 13, have applied to UCL, belfast, glasgow, york and swansea and have recieved 4/5 offers.
I’m predicted 3 A*s but I didn’t apply to oxford because I was worried about my gcse results (9998877777) not being good enough, but after some conversations with teachers (after oxbridge deadline 😭) they seemed to think i would have had a chance of getting in.
I really regret not applying now, just because of the world class teaching i would receive there and all of the opportunities it could’ve given me.
So, i was wondering if i applied to oxford in the next ucas cycle after results day, what would happen with my current offers? would i be able to defer for a year and keep my offers as a back up if i get rejected or would i have to apply all over again? any help with any of this would be really appreciated, thanks!
for reference applying for law, currently study politics, english lit and sociology
Reply 1
You would have to reject all your current offers to apply to Oxford in the next cycle. Consider carefully, especially if you have already received an offer at UCL law which is very good.
Why didn’t you apply to more reach schools (Durham + LSE)???? Forget about oxbridge
Original post by keira7878
Hi, this is kind of a random one but i’m feeling kind of lost right now trying to figure this all out on my own, and would really appreciate some help.
I’m currently in year 13, have applied to UCL, belfast, glasgow, york and swansea and have recieved 4/5 offers.
I’m predicted 3 A*s but I didn’t apply to oxford because I was worried about my gcse results (9998877777) not being good enough, but after some conversations with teachers (after oxbridge deadline 😭) they seemed to think i would have had a chance of getting in.
I really regret not applying now, just because of the world class teaching i would receive there and all of the opportunities it could’ve given me.
So, i was wondering if i applied to oxford in the next ucas cycle after results day, what would happen with my current offers? would i be able to defer for a year and keep my offers as a back up if i get rejected or would i have to apply all over again? any help with any of this would be really appreciated, thanks!
for reference applying for law, currently study politics, english lit and sociology

I would consider this move very carefully, for three reasons:

1.

UCL is a top-level uni, and rejecting an offer from them without a guaranteed replacement (the Oxford offer cannot be guaranteed) is somewhat risky, although if it is your dream why not.

2.

Secondly, my opinion, being a 2nd year law student here is that the Oxford way of teaching is 99.9% self-study. Even the lectures usually do not match chronologically what you do in tutorials (ie. they are useless, at least then), because the tutorials are organized by college professors who rarely align them with the university-aligned lecture lists. Additionally, in my 2 years here, there have been very few tutorials from which I would walk out thinking that I have gained some usable knowledge. You walk in, once a week, for 60 min, having read the entire reading list and written the essay on your own and everyone expects that you are already a semi-expert in that week's content. There isn't much that you are told in those 60 min. There may be some 'guidance,' or 'essay-specific feedback,' but hardly 'teaching.'

3.

The prospect of a gap year is something to consider. Would you be able to use that time productively and come back to an academic lifestyle after a year of doing whatever else? Just a general question to consider.

Congratulations on your offers and good luck ahead of A-levels!
Original post by StudySakura
Hi there, Please can I ask which subject you study?

Law
Reply 5
Can I ask when I received your offer for ucl? I’m still waiting
Original post by anonymous125555
I would consider this move very carefully, for three reasons:

1.

UCL is a top-level uni, and rejecting an offer from them without a guaranteed replacement (the Oxford offer cannot be guaranteed) is somewhat risky, although if it is your dream why not.

2.

Secondly, my opinion, being a 2nd year law student here is that the Oxford way of teaching is 99.9% self-study. Even the lectures usually do not match chronologically what you do in tutorials (ie. they are useless, at least then), because the tutorials are organized by college professors who rarely align them with the university-aligned lecture lists. Additionally, in my 2 years here, there have been very few tutorials from which I would walk out thinking that I have gained some usable knowledge. You walk in, once a week, for 60 min, having read the entire reading list and written the essay on your own and everyone expects that you are already a semi-expert in that week's content. There isn't much that you are told in those 60 min. There may be some 'guidance,' or 'essay-specific feedback,' but hardly 'teaching.'

3.

The prospect of a gap year is something to consider. Would you be able to use that time productively and come back to an academic lifestyle after a year of doing whatever else? Just a general question to consider.

Congratulations on your offers and good luck ahead of A-levels!

hi! if you don't mind would you be able to talk about your Oxford journey for law, like GCSE/A level grades, LNAT, and super curriculars you did? For reference I got 9998876554 in my GCSEs and it is quite poor but I'm predicted 3 A* in A levels and wondered what average LNAT score and stuff to put in my ps would make up for it.
OP, there is always the prudent temptation to take one bird in the hand rather than chase after two birds in a bush. As the saying goes: "better is the enemy of good".

But, having said that, if you do obtain three As or above, and you then decide not to go to university this year but instead to apply for places in 2025, you will have a good chance of obtaining another group of good offers for 2025, and one of those offers might (I say might) be from Oxford. GCSE grades are not mega important in the admission process, and your GCSE grades are fine in any event.

The Oxford tutorial experience varies, depending on the tutors and the students. Some students like tutorials, some don't. The aim is guided self teaching. You are supposed to learn by reading, writing, and discussing what you have written. When I was a student, I usually found lectures boring and rather pointless, as you may be able to learn the same stuff more quickly by reading it for yourself. I have given law lectures at a couple of non-RG universities, and I was told by students that I was a good lecturer, but I thought that everybody's time could have been better spent in reading or in small group discussion.

Applying to Oxford is a gamble, and as you may know most people who apply don't get in. But the worst that can happen is that you will be a year older when you start university, and you might not get precisely the same offers for 2025 as you currently have for 2024. Against that, if you decide to do a further round of applications after you have your A level grades, the chances are that you'll still end up at a good university, and that university might be Oxford.
(edited 1 week ago)

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