Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Hey all,

    I'm wondering if there are any recent Leicester History students that could recommend me some books to read before I start the course? Ideally, those that people have found most useful and interesting for the degree course. Essay skills books would also be really helpful!!

    I've not received a reading list either; does anyone know when it comes out?

    Really looking forward to starting. It'd be great to meet any current students and those about to start on the same course!

    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    I've just finished my first year of a history degree at Leicester so I feel I have something to contribute.

    The following comes from the module guide for one of the modules you will do in your first semster called Making History:

    Students are strongly encouraged to work to develop their skills and understanding of history beyond the course. Books that you may find helpful include:
    • Mary Abbot (ed.), History Skills: A Student’s Handbook (London, 1996).
    • John H. Arnold, History: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford, 2000). I bought and read this but didn't think that much to it, other people I know off my course, however really enjoyed it. I'd say get it from the library before buying to see what you think of it.
    • Jeremy Black, Studying History (Basingstoke, 2000).
    • Michael Stanford, A Companion to the Study of History (Basingstoke, 1994).


    They would probably be the best ones to have a look at before you start (although pre-reading isn't necessary, you are given a reading list once you start.

    The other modules you will do in the first year (providing, of course they have not changed the syllabus since last year, which as far as I know they haven't) are Monarchy and Society, for which the reading list is as follows

    INTRODUCTORY RECOMMENDED READING

    • R.H.C. Davies, A History of Medieval Europe from Constantine to St Louis. 3rd end, ed. R.I. Moore (Longman, 2006)
    • I liked this book too. It was quite easy to read and I thought was a good introduction into what you will be doing about.
    • James Campbell, ed. The Anglo-Saxons (Penguin, 1991)
    • Michael Clanchy, England and its Rulers (Blackwell, 1998)
    • Marcus Bull, France in the Central Middle Ages (Oxford, 2002) I bought this one as I was doing an essay focusing on France nd enjoyed it. It would proabbly be of use for the rest of the module, especially as the lectures at times did focus on France a fair bit.
    • William C. Jordan, Europe in the High Middle Ages (Penguin, 2002)
    • Peter Linehan and Janet Nelson, The Medieval World (Routledge, 2003)


    The other module is Making of the Modern World, for which the reading list is:
    • Rondo Cameron, A concise economic history of the world (3rd edition, 2002) This one is actually really quite good, very helpful for the course and not nearly as boring and dry as it seems.
    • C. A. Bayly, The birth of the modern world 1780-1914: global connections and comparisons (2004) This one was also very good and great for the module
    • James Fulcher, Capitalism: A Very Short Introduction (2004)
    • Eric Hobsbawm, Age of capital, 1848-1875 (1988)
    • Eric Hobsbawm, Age of Empire, 1875-1914 (1989)
    • Eric Hobsbawm, Age of extremes: the short twentieth century, 1914-1991 (1995)
    • Paul Kennedy, The rise and fall of the great powers: economic change and military conflict from 1500-2000 (1989)
    • George Kenwood and Alan Lougheed, Growth of the international economy 1820-2000: an introductory text (1999)
    • David Landes, The Unbound Prometheus: technological change and industrial development in Western Europe from 1750 to the present (revised edition, 2003)
    • David Landes, The Wealth and Poverty of Nations (1998)
    • Manfred B. Steger, Globalization: A Very Short Introduction (2003)


    Hope that helps and any other questions, please feel free to ask me and I'll try and help you.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by QI Elf)
    I've just finished my first year of a history degree at Leicester so I feel I have something to contribute.

    The following comes from the module guide for one of the modules you will do in your first semster called Making History:

    Students are strongly encouraged to work to develop their skills and understanding of history beyond the course. Books that you may find helpful include:
    • Mary Abbot (ed.), History Skills: A Student’s Handbook (London, 1996).
    • John H. Arnold, History: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford, 2000). I bought and read this but didn't think that much to it, other people I know off my course, however really enjoyed it. I'd say get it from the library before buying to see what you think of it.
    • Jeremy Black, Studying History (Basingstoke, 2000).
    • Michael Stanford, A Companion to the Study of History (Basingstoke, 1994).


    They would probably be the best ones to have a look at before you start (although pre-reading isn't necessary, you are given a reading list once you start.

    The other modules you will do in the first year (providing, of course they have not changed the syllabus since last year, which as far as I know they haven't) are Monarchy and Society, for which the reading list is as follows

    INTRODUCTORY RECOMMENDED READING

    • R.H.C. Davies, A History of Medieval Europe from Constantine to St Louis. 3rd end, ed. R.I. Moore (Longman, 2006)
    • Robert Bartlett, England under the Norman and Angevin Kings, 1075-1225 (Oxford UP, 2000)
    • James Campbell, ed. The Anglo-Saxons (Penguin, 1991)
    • Michael Clanchy, England and its Rulers (Blackwell, 1998)
    • Marcus Bull, France in the Central Middle Ages (Oxford, 2002) I bought this one as I was doing an essay focusing on France nd enjoyed it. It would proabbly be of use for the rest of the module, especially as the lectures at times did focus on France a fair bit.
    • William C. Jordan, Europe in the High Middle Ages (Penguin, 2002)
    • Peter Linehan and Janet Nelson, The Medieval World (Routledge, 2003)


    The other module is Making of the Modern World, for which the reading list is:
    • Rondo Cameron, A concise economic history of the world (3rd edition, 2002) This one is actually really quite good, very helpful for the course and not nearly as boring and dry as it seems.
    • C. A. Bayly, The birth of the modern world 1780-1914: global connections and comparisons (2004)
    • James Fulcher, Capitalism: A Very Short Introduction (2004)
    • Eric Hobsbawm, Age of capital, 1848-1875 (1988)
    • Eric Hobsbawm, Age of Empire, 1875-1914 (1989)
    • Eric Hobsbawm, Age of extremes: the short twentieth century, 1914-1991 (1995)
    • Paul Kennedy, The rise and fall of the great powers: economic change and military conflict from 1500-2000 (1989)
    • George Kenwood and Alan Lougheed, Growth of the international economy 1820-2000: an introductory text (1999)
    • David Landes, The Unbound Prometheus: technological change and industrial development in Western Europe from 1750 to the present (revised edition, 2003)
    • David Landes, The Wealth and Poverty of Nations (1998)
    • Manfred B. Steger, Globalization: A Very Short Introduction (2003)


    Hope that helps and any other questions, please feel free to ask me and I'll try and help you.
    That's awesome, thanks!
    I just want to get a general grip on some of the stuff I'll be faced with so I'm not utterly stumped and swamped in reading when I get there!!
    The short history sounds interesting, as an intro...

    I'll hit Amazon and see if any second hand books are going
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Choccielatte)
    That's awesome, thanks!
    I just want to get a general grip on some of the stuff I'll be faced with so I'm not utterly stumped and swamped in reading when I get there!!
    The short history sounds interesting, as an intro...

    I'll hit Amazon and see if any second hand books are going
    Once you get to Leicester there will be loads of the books of the lists in the Uni Second Hand Bookshop. That's where I bought most of mine from.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by QI Elf)
    Once you get to Leicester there will be loads of the books of the lists in the Uni Second Hand Bookshop. That's where I bought most of mine from.
    I shall have to wait to have a look. I don't want to spend endless amounts on books!! :o:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    im studying history at leicester next year too :-)
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I'm doing History too.

    I've forgotten EVERYTHING since being on my gap year. I think i'm going to have to do some reading to refresh my memory.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I have found this

    http://www.le.ac.uk/hi/ug/preliminaryreading.html

    But it's pretty much the same titles that QI Elf listed for us.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by BeanzMeanzHeinzWard)
    I have found this

    http://www.le.ac.uk/hi/ug/preliminaryreading.html

    But it's pretty much the same titles that QI Elf listed for us.
    Thanks a lot !

    Blimey, that's a lot of books.... I'm gonna be broke... :o:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by BeanzMeanzHeinzWard)
    I have found this

    http://www.le.ac.uk/hi/ug/preliminaryreading.html

    But it's pretty much the same titles that QI Elf listed for us.

    Do you know of anything similar for law? I looked but couldn't find any, if anyone knows of anything, it'd be great.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by _Ariel_)
    Do you know of anything similar for law? I looked but couldn't find any, if anyone knows of anything, it'd be great.

    No sorry.

    Maybe try e-mailing the Law dept for a reading list.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Choccielatte)
    Thanks a lot !

    Blimey, that's a lot of books.... I'm gonna be broke... :o:

    I am buying 2nd hand from Amazon.

    I'm selling old text books on there too.

    I read somewhere on here, that the three modules for the first semester last year were 'Monarchy and Society' - 'Making History' and 'The Making of the Modern World, 1600-2000'

    Given the reading list on the site, that would make sense for this year.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by BeanzMeanzHeinzWard)
    No sorry.

    Maybe try e-mailing the Law dept for a reading list.
    Well, thanks anyway
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Choccielatte)
    Thanks a lot !

    Blimey, that's a lot of books.... I'm gonna be broke... :o:

    You don't have to buy all of the books. I got around 2/3 for each module and that was more than most people bought. The library is relatively well stocked with books on the readings lists and is where I got most of mine from. You also don't have to read all of them- again 3/4 for a module (if that TBH in the 1st year especially) would be fine.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by _Ariel_)
    Do you know of anything similar for law? I looked but couldn't find any, if anyone knows of anything, it'd be great.
    I don't know specifically which books are required for law but I had friends that did 1st year law this year and they needed to buy all the books on their reading list as it has cases in each one. The law books for the first year alone cost upwards from £100 brand new in the Library bookshop. There was one on tort law, criminal justice, analysing law etc.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by L3ann3)
    I don't know specifically which books are required for law but I had friends that did 1st year law this year and they needed to buy all the books on their reading list as it has cases in each one. The law books for the first year alone cost upwards from £100 brand new in the Library bookshop. There was one on tort law, criminal justice, analysing law etc.

    £ 100 total I hope? Haven't recceived a reading list yet so we'll see I guess.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by QI Elf)
    You don't have to buy all of the books. I got around 2/3 for each module and that was more than most people bought. The library is relatively well stocked with books on the readings lists and is where I got most of mine from. You also don't have to read all of them- again 3/4 for a module (if that TBH in the 1st year especially) would be fine.
    Phew! I just pray I get the grades now!
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Brussels sprouts
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.