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    Also English Lit is quite a hard subject so it seems strange that the grade boundaries are so high, I assume they don't mark it too harshly?
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    (Original post by NiallD)
    Does it really have to be 4/5? My teacher said 3 would be enough. The answer's supposed to be 75% based on the poem you're given, and 25% on other poems so 4/5 seems a bit excessive in that case, unless some of them were really brief crossovers.
    3 would probably be enough as i suppose over all you are going to be making 3 main points/paragraphs. i suppose it just depends on how much detail you go into for your other poems, if they are just brief comparisions then adding more poems would be ideal just to ensure you have covered all the AOs.
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    How many critics would you say are required in the novel essay?
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    I think that, as the grade boundaries are quite high, the examiners actually mark quite nicely. In other words, they mark positively, rather than deducting marks for what they feel is wrong.

    We're all in this together guys!
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    Also, bear in mind that for the poetry, they're actually rather specific with what they want: imagery, language, verse form, and how the poem relates to other poems that you have studied. They don't actually ask for anything context-y about Irish politics, although a brief inclusion of this could impress the examiner! So make sure you include what they actually ask for.
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    (Original post by kathryn007)
    3 would probably be enough as i suppose over all you are going to be making 3 main points/paragraphs. i suppose it just depends on how much detail you go into for your other poems, if they are just brief comparisions then adding more poems would be ideal just to ensure you have covered all the AOs.
    Yeah, I think if you were going to detail with all the comparisons then 3 should probably be enough, although if you make brief points for example noting that Leda, Among Schoolchildren, Wild Swans, The Second Coming and The Cold Heaven all end with an interrogative which shows the complexity and uncertainty of Yeats' views, and with something like that you could end up with links to 8 poems and still only talk about it briefly

    (Original post by ArtisticFlair)
    I think that, as the grade boundaries are quite high, the examiners actually mark quite nicely. In other words, they mark positively, rather than deducting marks for what they feel is wrong.

    We're all in this together guys!
    Yeah I think that as well, my teacher said that the most important thing to remember is that the examiner is on our side and will want us to do well. They won't mark for what's not there in the essay, so basically if you just make sure you hit all the assessment objectives then you should be fine
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    (Original post by gvb)
    How many critics would you say are required in the novel essay?
    Depends on the rest of A03 in your essay.
    Technically, one well-addressed critical opinion could be enough, providing you've offered alternative view points to your other points and looked at different 'perspectives' (feminist/Marxist/political e.t.c, depending on what is relevant to your text.)
    Whatever you do, don't put critics in for the sake of putting them in. Make sure they are relevant to your point and relevant to the question. Some of the examiner reports I've read said that this is something that students forget.

    So, after that, I'd aim for two where possible (With additional AO3 points), so that I have an extra chance in case I didn't address the first one as fully as I ought to have.
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    (Original post by CinnamonStuff)
    Depends on the rest of A03 in your essay.
    Technically, one well-addressed critical opinion could be enough, providing you've offered alternative view points to your other points and looked at different 'perspectives' (feminist/Marxist/political e.t.c, depending on what is relevant to your text.)
    Whatever you do, don't put critics in for the sake of putting them in. Make sure they are relevant to your point and relevant to the question. Some of the examiner reports I've read said that this is something that students forget.

    So, after that, I'd aim for two where possible (With additional AO3 points), so that I have an extra chance in case I didn't address the first one as fully as I ought to have.
    thanks very much, very useful! With regard to feminist/Marxist critics etc, can this just be sentences linking it to the question type rather than quotations?
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    Guys, does anyone have any Dorian Gray critics quotes...I know i've asked like 4 times but i actually have none
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    I was always under the impression that for the novels essay you had to actually quote critics in full with their names however this is not the case. Provided that you say 'some critics suggest...' or 'it has been suggested..' then explain the point and argue your point, not necessarily using a quotation from the critic you can still get the same amount of marks as someone who uses loads of critics and their specific points. This is great if like me you cant remember any critics!
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    If I got 38/40 for my coursework, does anyone have any idea what I would need to get in the exam tomorrow for an A?

    Thanks
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    (Original post by kathryn007)
    I was always under the impression that for the novels essay you had to actually quote critics in full with their names however this is not the case. Provided that you say 'some critics suggest...' or 'it has been suggested..' then explain the point and argue your point, not necessarily using a quotation from the critic you can still get the same amount of marks as someone who uses loads of critics and their specific points. This is great if like me you cant remember any critics!
    This is definitely true, but my teacher warned us that having the name of a critic adds some definition to your point. Sort of...reinforces it.
    But you're right. You don't /have/ to have direct quotations or critic names. It's not like they're going to check the direct quotation or that the name of the critic is the name of an actual person.
    And definitely better to have an unnamed critic than none at all!
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    (Original post by CinnamonStuff)
    This is definitely true, but my teacher warned us that having the name of a critic adds some definition to your point. Sort of...reinforces it.
    But you're right. You don't /have/ to have direct quotations or critic names. It's not like they're going to check the direct quotation or that the name of the critic is the name of an actual person.
    And definitely better to have an unnamed critic than none at all!
    That is very true! If you can remember them then it is of course a bonus. Its possible to actually make your own 'critical point' and claim it is from a critic. eg: 'Some critics suggest that Shelly presents women in a very anti-femenist light' this is my interpretation but of course, the examiner wont know that.
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    (Original post by gvb)
    thanks very much, very useful! With regard to feminist/Marxist critics etc, can this just be sentences linking it to the question type rather than quotations?
    Well. It depends.
    The way I've approached it before is:

    • Point
    • Quote
    • This contrasts/is comparable to/offers the feminist/Marxist/political view of the text....e.t.c.
    • Link back to question. (Possibly with some A04)


    But I can't guarantee that it's the 'right' way to do it. P:
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    (Original post by lindseyyy)
    If I got 38/40 for my coursework, does anyone have any idea what I would need to get in the exam tomorrow for an A?

    Thanks
    I'm fed up now.... I've made a grade calculator in excel based on the june 2012 boundaries (jan 2013 it's 1 mark harder for coursework, 1 mark easier for the exam), you'd need 47/60 for an A
    Attached Files
  1. File Type: xls English Boundaries.xls (38.5 KB, 210 views)
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    Is one of the two questions for the novel usually set around a theme, i.e. homoeroticism?
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    My teachers wouldn't tell us what we got in our coursework. I'm paranoid now. -_-
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    Can anyone tell me what the Emily Dickinson and The Picture of Dorian Gray questions were in the Jan 2013 paper?
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    Can someone explain to me the Marxist interpretation of Frankenstein? I know the basic Marxist theories but not to sure how these apply to Frankenstein.. online essays explaining it can be quite confusing!
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    (Original post by kathryn007)
    Can someone explain to me the Marxist interpretation of Frankenstein? I know the basic Marxist theories but not to sure how these apply to Frankenstein.. online essays explaining it can be quite confusing!
    A Marxist reading is just an interpretation which identifies the characters and events in terms of political and social undercurrents. Shelley herself was quite political; her father WIlliam Godwin was a political humanist and her mother was obviously the loudmouth feminist.

    The most obvious political event that could be tied to frankenstein is the french revolution: it could be seen as an attempt to bring about Rousseau's perfecting of a natural man - getting rid of the oppressive upper class and man will develop without boundaries - in a way the creature is a more improved / perfected version of Frankenstein (see Anne Mellor's evolution of man criticisms). The creature could be the personified spirit of revolution, seeking to overthrow the oppressive classes (i.e. kill Frankenstein and his family, who are quite wealthy) but turns into chaos like the mob and the whole guillotining everyone fiasco with Robespierre...
 
 
 
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