UNOFFICIAL MARKSCHEME!~AQA GCSE Physics Unit 2 25th Janurary NEW SPEC Watch

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infamous123
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#541
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#541
but guys gravity is a force. The question asked what 'force'...
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IsaacIIV
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#542
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(Original post by infamous123)
but guys gravity is a force. The question asked what 'force'...
which force...

please tell me where on here it says gravity is a force: 'http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravitation'
as opposed to the force due to gravity, which in our case is weight
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infamous123
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#543
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#543
mad bro? Chill...
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Dalek1099
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#544
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(Original post by IsaacIIV)
which force...

please tell me where on here it says gravity is a force: 'http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravitation'
as opposed to the force due to gravity, which in our case is weight
They do have a point though because we refer to the force pushing inwards in a star as the gravity.
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IsaacIIV
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(Original post by infamous123)
mad bro? Chill...
I'm just trying to be realistic, i don't write the mark schemes, nor do I determine the laws of physics... I'm just saying that in all likelihood, the mark scheme will ask for 'weight'... what would be the point in the question if both were accepted anyway?
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Beat
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#546
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(Original post by IsaacIIV)
which force...

please tell me where on here it says gravity is a force: 'http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravitation'
as opposed to the force due to gravity, which in our case is weight
If gravity attracts us to the Earth then how come it doesn't attract oil droplets to the Earth?
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infamous123
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#547
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#547
Also for the question that asked name another factor that effects braking distance I put 'speed' is that correct?
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infamous123
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(Original post by Beat)
If gravity attracts us to the Earth then how come it doesn't attract oil droplets to the Earth?
True...
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IsaacIIV
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#549
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#549
the pushing force inwards on a star is CAUSED by gravity, it isn't gravity itself, but the weight of the star collapsing in on itself. I apologise if my answers earlier on stable stars was unclear on that. Who knows, maybe I lost a mark on that question for saying 'force of gravity'...?
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08suttonb
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#550
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#550
For the calculatuion question which asked for 2 s.f would it be correct if i put 1.6 recurring? i've seen everybody say its 1.7 but technically 1.6 recurring is 2 s.f
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IsaacIIV
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#551
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think about t like this. gravity only attracts us to earth because we have a mass, without one, we would float. weight is the result of both gravity AND mass, and thus the force that acts upon us is the product of both MASS and GRAVITY, which is weight. if you still aren't convinced I recommend you speak to your physics teacher about it.
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IsaacIIV
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#552
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speed is correct, other answer could include, surface material of road, and weather conditions
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Alex_Aits
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#553
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#553
(Original post by infamous123)
For the question about the two problems about the circuit: I put 'The voltmeter should have been across the diode not the ammeter'- Is that correct ?
Don't know whether the exam mark scheme will accept that - the text book just states that the voltmeter has to be connected the circuit in PARALLEL and that the ammeter has to be connected in SERIES.
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IsaacIIV
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#554
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1.6r is 2 figures, but not 2 SIG figs, sorry but your probably going to lose the mark on this one..
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Beat
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(Original post by IsaacIIV)
think about t like this. gravity only attracts us to earth because we have a mass, without one, we would float. weight is the result of both gravity AND mass, and thus the force that acts upon us is the product of both MASS and GRAVITY, which is weight. if you still aren't convinced I recommend you speak to your physics teacher about it.
The oil droplet will have a mass though? If it didn't have a mass then god knows...
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Alex_Aits
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(Original post by IsaacIIV)
think about t like this. gravity only attracts us to earth because we have a mass, without one, we would float. weight is the result of both gravity AND mass, and thus the force that acts upon us is the product of both MASS and GRAVITY, which is weight. if you still aren't convinced I recommend you speak to your physics teacher about it.
Mate, you need to chill. It's the FIRST QUESTION on the exam paper... so they are probably going to accept both weight and force... Technically gravity is a force according to the AQA specification and text books, no matter how wrong it is.
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IsaacIIV
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#557
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(Original post by Alex_Aits)
Mate, you need to chill. It's the FIRST QUESTION on the exam paper... so they are probably going to accept both weight and force... Technically gravity is a force according to the AQA specification and text books, no matter how wrong it is.
If the AQA Spec. says anywhere on it that gravity is a force than that's good and you'll probably get the mark.

having just looked, the only mention os it is :

  1. An object falling through a fluid will initially acceleratedue to the force of gravity. Eventually the resultantforce will be zero and the object will move at itsterminal velocity (steady speed).




which says force of gravity, not sure now? still doubt it, but at the end of the day, it's only 1 mark
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SportsFan
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#558
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Can you please make a mark scheme because you seem confident on all the answers
(Original post by IsaacIIV)
1.6r is 2 figures, but not 2 SIG figs, sorry but your probably going to lose the mark on this one..
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IsaacIIV
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(Original post by SportsFan)
Can you please make a mark scheme because you seem confident on all the answers
I'se happily make a mark scheme if you could create a booklet of the questions
it doesn't need to be too specific, but i can't recall them all on my own
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Beat
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(Original post by IsaacIIV)
If the AQA Spec. says anywhere on it that gravity is a force than that's good and you'll probably get the mark.

having just looked, the only mention os it is :

  1. An object falling through a fluid will initially acceleratedue to the force of gravity. Eventually the resultantforce will be zero and the object will move at itsterminal velocity (steady speed).




which says force of gravity, not sure now? still doubt it, but at the end of the day, it's only 1 mark
Gravity is a force that attracts objects with mass towards each other. The weight of an object is the force on it due to gravity.

The earth has a mass, and so does the droplet hence gravity takes place. The droplet can't have 'weight' without gravity.
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