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    tough luck......... but not impossible..... you just have to try extra hard...
    I know a guy who got a 3rd from LSE BSc Econ..... and now is working in IBD at a BB............. but then again, I just only 1 guy who has done it!
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    (Original post by Valentas)
    Just curious because I always saw posts that LSE is elite uni... Is it hard to get the 1st a LSE? In Economics for example?
    (Original post by Frenchous)
    Besides with 40%-50% of people getting a first at LSE, its the most overinflated grading scheme of all top 5 econ unis and just doesnt mean anything anymore. The other are all around 25%...
    (Original post by CoolStoryBroo)
    It's actually 39% and the other average unis are like 15%
    I just had a look at the internal statistics and the overall proportion of First degrees awarded over the past three years has been 22%. For BSc Economics it's 35%. This doesn't imply that the course is easy, however.
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    How can anyone take a comment like the one below seriously? If you're going to make such statements pony up with the evidence because you simply convey a level of ignorance based on your opinion.


    (Original post by Frenchous)
    Besides with 40%-50% of people getting a first at LSE, its the most overinflated grading scheme of all top 5 econ unis and just doesnt mean anything anymore. The other are all around 25%...
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    As said by steviewonders and effofex the industry is getting pumped full of EU grads with far more skill than the UK students. Tougher pre-uni exams, multiple languages, most do a masters and most study abroad aswell for a few semesters all of this puts a UK grad on the back foot.

    I think the only AC I went to where UK nationals were a majority was Lloyds and they are heavily focused in the UK anyway. Everything else, even at consultancy firms were filled with multilingual and talented Europeans.
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    (Original post by mgarthwaite1330)
    How can anyone take a comment like the one below seriously? If you're going to make such statements pony up with the evidence because you simply convey a level of ignorance based on your opinion.
    Ever heard of unistat? I am not going to dig the exact figures for you but if you have an internet browser you should (not sure given your comment) be able to find them

    LSE gives 40% of first and UCL 18%. The others are closer to 25%.

    Now go hang yourself

    Edit: fuktard
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    (Original post by Zürich)
    got a 1st from LSE in Economics and finding it hard so its not that simple anymore...
    Do a masters
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    (Original post by CEKTOP)
    Do a masters
    That would not change the original degree classification.

    Basically, the only solutions are to develop some fantastic personality traits and get some kind of experience that demonstrates them; or make a different career choice.
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    (Original post by Voyager_2002)
    That would not change the original degree classification.

    Basically, the only solutions are to develop some fantastic personality traits and get some kind of experience that demonstrates them; or make a different career choice.
    OP should become and economist
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    (Original post by CoolStoryBroo)
    OP should become and economist
    With a crap degree?

    No, a 2.2 that is not from Oxford or Cambridge is ideal for a job selling double glazing, or perhaps being an estate agent.
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    Just thinking about this; would OP not be able to do another undergraduate degree (potentially with the open university) and maybe use the experience, extra-curriculars etc picked up at LSE (and the fact his CV does still say LSE) to get spring weeks, summer internships etc and make it in. If he went with the open university then maybe he could complete a degree in less time, or if he went and studied at somewhere like Notts, Bristol etc, he should be able to use his experience to make it in by the end of the degree (ie: 3 years). I know it's a long way in and costs a lot of money (to go back to university if it wasn't the open university), but if I remember rightly, the A level grades have to be first sitting, but the degree doesn't, so potentially, this would work in theory?
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    (Original post by Indus)
    Just thinking about this; would OP not be able to do another undergraduate degree (potentially with the open university) and maybe use the experience, extra-curriculars etc picked up at LSE (and the fact his CV does still say LSE) to get spring weeks, summer internships etc and make it in. If he went with the open university then maybe he could complete a degree in less time, or if he went and studied at somewhere like Notts, Bristol etc, he should be able to use his experience to make it in by the end of the degree (ie: 3 years). I know it's a long way in and costs a lot of money (to go back to university if it wasn't the open university), but if I remember rightly, the A level grades have to be first sitting, but the degree doesn't, so potentially, this would work in theory?
    1) Which target uni would want someone who failed at LSE?

    2) Tuition fee is now 9k/annum and Student finance won't sponsor him a 2nd time round

    If i was OP I would disregard education and acquire capital in the meanwhile to open a business in a few years down the line.

    ...Or actually become an economist with his economics degree since that isn't hard to get into.
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    (Original post by CoolStoryBroo)
    1) Which target uni would want someone who failed at LSE?

    2) Tuition fee is now 9k/annum and Student finance won't sponsor him a 2nd time round

    If i was OP I would disregard education and acquire capital in the meanwhile to open a business in a few years down the line.

    ...Or actually become an economist with his economics degree since that isn't hard to get into.
    Yes, there are a lot of variables, but i'm more posing the question as to whether this could theoretically work. At the end of the day, would a 2.1 from another university cancel out the LSE 2.2, as most internships/graduate applications just ask for a 2.1 from what I remember, not specifying a first sitting of the degree. I'm also wondering if he would be competitive if he was to do this; is it just the 2.2 from LSE which is holding him back? Would he be easily getting offers if he had a 2.1? For all we know he may have an exceptional CV but be getting filtered everywhere. Doing another degree and going through spring weeks, summer internships and graduate applications may be the best idea.

    I don't think he necessarily needs to go to a target university if he does have an exceptional CV and only be losing out to the filters, and I definitely don't think he should study economics. I'm also not sure whether universities will care so much that he went to LSE as long as his A levels are good (and they must be for LSE presumably). If he was to have on his CV:

    Nottingham/UCL/Warwick/Bristol - BSc Accounting and Finance or BSc Maths or BSc Chemistry etc.. predicted 1st

    LSE - BSc Economics - 2.2

    Then he can just say to recruiters that he felt as though he wanted to study something more finance related/maths/engineering/chemistry/whatever ie: something that isn't economics, and he can say that he didn't enjoy economics at LSE enough to put the effort in etc, or something like that (remember that IB is not economics, so even if he isn't passionate about economics, he can still have a passion for IB). As long as he could get interviews, he could explain his way out of the 2.2 at LSE and the fact that he is doing another BSc.

    I do think that having LSE on his CV may still count for something (and if not, if he does have an exceptional CV, then he doesn't need LSE anyway), even though he has a 2.2 and has gone on to do another degree - hence why I suggested the open university, as this cuts out the cost, and may take him less time to complete the degree, although I don't know if it is fixed at 3 years or can be shortened (although I have no idea of it's reputation and have never seen anyone from there at ACs or interning). If OP had the money then going for another degree wouldn't be a financial issue, if he reckons he can make it into banking by the time he graduates he can easily pay it back in the end.

    Maybe OP wants to be a banker and not an economist, or a businessperson. Not sure how he would acquire capital etc; you mean a graduate scheme asking for a 2.2?

    As I said in my first sentence, there are many variables (ie: him having money, having an exceptional CV that he could get into banking from a non-target etc), but theoretically, COULD this work? I'm not saying that this is the only option for the OP, but if he is set on banking and can get past these variables, then it is an option surely?
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    That's definitely a viable option, Indus. Although as you said there are a number of variables. I myself am a LSE graduate, however with a 2.1 and have found it quite difficult in getting a banking graduate job. It's extremely competitive, even with masters students are applying for internships. So the OP may find it tough even if he does take this route.


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    Tough one. I would give up on IB right now. It might have been an option even with a 2:2 if you had done an internship and had an extensive network within one or more banks who would go to bat for you, but without that it isn't going to happen.

    Some people will have anecdotes of friends with 2:2s or 3rds who made it into IB, but there are 100 factors at play there that aren't being mentioned--I'd very happily bet a large amount of money not one of the guys with a 2:2 or below mentioned on this thread had (1) no relevant work experience and (2) no contacts. Thinking on the basis of these anecdotes that it's a viable option for anyone of whom (1) and (2) are true is ludicrous. There are currently on average well over 100 applicants per place at the BBs, and you have to be massively exceptional in other ways for them to overlook a 2:2.

    If you want to do finance still I'd start looking for boutique accounting and PWM firms. Some of those you might have a decent shot at, if you can interview well. I assume LSE provides an alumni careers service--I'd go talk to them and get their advice on your options, they'll have a lot more experience with what options are available to you than the vast majority of the armchair experts here.
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    (Original post by Philosopher-of-sorts)
    Tough one. I would give up on IB right now. It might have been an option even with a 2:2 if you had done an internship and had an extensive network within one or more banks who would go to bat for you, but without that it isn't going to happen.

    Some people will have anecdotes of friends with 2:2s or 3rds who made it into IB, but there are 100 factors at play there that aren't being mentioned--I'd very happily bet a large amount of money not one of the guys with a 2:2 or below mentioned on this thread had (1) no relevant work experience and (2) no contacts. Thinking on the basis of these anecdotes that it's a viable option for anyone of whom (1) and (2) are true is ludicrous. There are currently on average well over 100 applicants per place at the BBs, and you have to be massively exceptional in other ways for them to overlook a 2:2.

    If you want to do finance still I'd start looking for boutique accounting and PWM firms. Some of those you might have a decent shot at, if you can interview well. I assume LSE provides an alumni careers service--I'd go talk to them and get their advice on your options, they'll have a lot more experience with what options are available to you than the vast majority of the armchair experts here.
    I don't think he has to give up on IB with a 2:2 Personally, you alluded to the idea in your third paragraph but it doesn't have to be just accounting and PWM firms to the OP can apply, there are hundreds, if not thousands Broking, Securities, AM & HF's out there. It only takes one at the end of the day.
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    (Original post by Hackett)
    I don't think he has to give up on IB with a 2:2 Personally, you alluded to the idea in your third paragraph but it doesn't have to be just accounting and PWM firms to the OP can apply, there are hundreds, if not thousands Broking, Securities, AM & HF's out there. It only takes one at the end of the day.
    Yeah I guess I wasn't explicit enough, wasn't saying those were the only options, just that they're a good place to start looking.

    A graduate with a 2:2, no relevant work experience and (I'm going to presume) no relevant, impressive extra-curriculars is facing an almost insurmountable challenge going for IB. Unless OP is willing and able to hustle harder than every guy with a 2:1 or above out there who wants to go for IB--i.e. applying for every IB job that moves, 5 man boutique or otherwise, and cold calling/cold emailing for long days every day for weeks/months, then it really isn't worth getting his hopes up. Props to the OP if he has the enormous stamina and capacity to endure failure to manage that. I would find it sort of odd that someone with that capacity for grind left LSE with a 2:2 though.
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    The grades speak for themselves.
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    i had a 2.1 from LSE and, shall we say, limited work experience. even though my grades got me through most the initial filters, i was screened out before interview for many of the well known, attractive grad schemes, probably due to my weak all round profile.

    for a start, forget about banking (any flavour) or consulting. those opportunities are not there for you. you have to apply broadly and keep an open mind on industry, location and entry point.

    the credentials arms race relents a fair bit outside of the most in demand industries and roles, so you may find some employers more forgiving of your academic lapses. however, no one is going to look well on a total lack of experience (trust me), so sorting that should be your first priority.
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    I also got a 2.2 from LSE as well. I initially started out doing Social Policy and Economics but failed economics in my second year had to do another year and ended up with a 2.2 in Social Policy. I thought I was done for and will be unemployed for a long time. However I got a job straight after uni and now got a huge pay rise.

    When I started at LSE I got involved in the widening participation scheme to get lots of work experience on top of that I always worked throughout the summer. My advice is to stop applying for the mainstream graduate scheme and start looking for jobs in a smaller company that are not graduate schemes but may want someone with a degree.

    You can and will get a job you just have to be willing to compromise on your career goals for the meantime and work on trying to get more experience and using it to get you a better job in the future. I do think having LSE on my CV helped a bit despite my 2.2 degree however you still have to show that you have more than just a degree.

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