Newbie Coders Chat

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    (Original post by miser)
    I think Euler is usually too difficult for coding beginners unless you have a strong maths background. Most beginners to coding are also learning how to think algorithmically, in addition to the workings of their chosen language.
    I've just personally always thought that programming a mathematical solution to a problem is a waste of my time. I'd rather do something exciting and fun.
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    (Original post by _gcx)
    I've been at it for around 5 days, and I've only done 22 :P

    Some of them I am able to solve, but they will take far too long to execute by using brute force as I am now. (10 and 25, because of the recursion, for example)

    I'm still working at it, though
    I don't remember how many I solved (it was a few years ago now), but I remember being limited by my maths ability. I've never studied maths beyond school so the problems tended to be fairly tricky, and often difficult to research into. Still, pretty fun though. Good luck with it!
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    Currently learning Java, and Python. :yep:
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    are some of you guys doing a non-compsci degree at uni? I want to study law and economics and was thinking of doing this on the side
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    (Original post by Aklaol)
    I've just personally always thought that programming a mathematical solution to a problem is a waste of my time. I'd rather do something exciting and fun.
    Well, I find it fun! It really depends if you have an interest in mathematics or not. Also, it really isn't. Some mathematical tasks are too tedious (for example, doing something millions of times, potentially to prove/disprove a conjecture via proof by exhaustion), or hard/infeasible, to be done by hand, so programming comes into definite practical usage. It can also help answer interesting questions about mathematics!

    (Original post by serah.exe)
    Currently learning Java, and Python. :yep:
    Cool! What have you done with it so far?
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    (Original post by _gcx)

    Cool! What have you done with it so far?
    Hi
    Well, I'm currently just going along with codeacademy route.
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    (Original post by serah.exe)
    Hi
    Well, I'm currently just going along with codeacademy route.
    Codecademy is good for beginners, definitely! When I was learning python, I often found that codecademy was quite slow, and it really didn't give me enough to do what I wanted, so I'd say it's good up to a point. You may find it extremely useful, however!
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    (Original post by _gcx)
    Well, I find it fun! It really depends if you have an interest in mathematics or not. Also, it really isn't. Some mathematical tasks are too tedious (for example, doing something millions of times, potentially to prove/disprove a conjecture via proof by exhaustion), or hard/infeasible, to be done by hand, so programming comes into definite practical usage. It can also help answer interesting questions about mathematics!



    Cool! What have you done with it so far?
    I have a genuine interest in mathematics, however I rather not implement pure mathematics in my programming projects. Whilst maths was essential in some programming projects I've done
    e.g:
    Code:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    Point p = new Point((int) (mouse.x + xPosition + (Math.cos(angle.get(i) * Math.PI / 180) * distance.get(i))), (int) (mouse.y - yPosition + (Math.sin(angle.get(i) * -Math.PI / 180) * distance.get(i))));
    It's not always something I like to focus on whilst programming. Things like desktop applications don't require heavy maths which is why I enjoy them. Don't get me wrong, without good mathematical knowledge, a lot of my projects wouldn't have existed today, however focusing on projects that require less maths makes programming more fun and less dull.
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    (Original post by _gcx)
    Codecademy is good for beginners, definitely! When I was learning python, I often found that codecademy was quite slow, and it really didn't give me enough to do what I wanted, so I'd say it's good up to a point. You may find it extremely useful, however!
    Ooooo, what would you recommend instead?
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    (Original post by serah.exe)
    Ooooo, what would you recommend instead?
    Do 25% of codeacademy then do this
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    (Original post by ihammmy)
    do 25% of codeacademy then do this
    Bookmarked
    Thank you
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    (Original post by serah.exe)
    Bookmarked
    Thank you
    If you find that route isn't getting you anywhere (as was the case for me), then just look around for problems to solve and learn by doing. I personally think that's a much better way of learning a language.
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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    If you find that route isn't getting you anywhere (as was the case for me), then just look around for problems to solve and learn by doing. I personally think that's a much better way of learning a language.
    Yeah, codeacademy is a bit slow.
    How so?
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    (Original post by serah.exe)
    Yeah, codeacademy is a bit slow.
    How so?
    From the age of about 10 I've been wanting to program but always stopped a few weeks after starting because it was dull and tedious. It was only at University where I properly got into it because we were given problems to solve that were genuinely interesting (not "make a turtle make a fancy shape" but things that were actually interesting like making a forest fire simulation or making a model to track isotope concentrations through an ocean column). If you're somebody who learns by doing rather than reading a tutorial, I think that's a much better way of learning how to program.

    Edit: Forgot to quote.
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    (Original post by serah.exe)
    Bookmarked
    Thank you
    Good luck
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    hi ive just started computing alevel and im using VB to program! ive only just started and am getting to grips.

    any helpful websites or tips would be appreciated!!!!
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    (Original post by lucy713)
    are some of you guys doing a non-compsci degree at uni? I want to study law and economics and was thinking of doing this on the side
    Well if you count Physics as a non comsci degree then yeah I am. I'm trying to learn HTML and CSS at the moment
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)

    Arrrggghhh!!!!!! :banghead: :banghead: :banghead:

    That awkward moment when you discover that HEX values can be abbreviated to just three digits of the full six, meaning that you've been manually typing #0099FF needlessly for the past decade or so :argh: :cry: :doh:
    I don't know where you heard this from. But it is wrong. Hexidecimal is base 16. You may be able to round knock off some off the characters, in special circumstances, but there is no rule to be had here i'm afraid. Do you know how to count in hexidecimal for example?
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    (Original post by john2054)
    I don't know where you heard this from. But it is wrong. Hexidecimal is base 16. You may be able to round knock off some off the characters, in special circumstances, but there is no rule to be had here i'm afraid. Do you know how to count in hexidecimal for example?
    She means colours represented as hex, as a quick cheat this is acceptable and functional.

    000
    A00
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    I can't be the only person on TSR trying to teach myself programming. Why not introduce yourself and say hi?
    What are you learning? What stage are you at? What goals do you have?
    All of this writing about coding in java, but no actual programs! I am disappointed! I have also been learning it for a week, and here are my first three programs to get you started with!

    public class HelloWorld { public static void main (String[] args) { System.out.print ("Hello, World"); }}

    public class Robot { String name; Robot (String name) { this.name = name; } void speak (String msg) { System.out.println(msg + name); } public static void main (String[] args) { Robot r = new Robot("debbie"); r.speak("hey there! It's me... "); Robot b = new Robot("bob"); b.speak("My name is... "); } }

    import java.util.Scanner;public class Wheel { double radius; Wheel (double radius) { this.radius = radius; } double getCircumference () { return 2 * Math.PI * radius; } double getArea () { return radius * radius * Math.PI; } public static void main (String[] args) { System.out.println("Please provide a real."); Scanner s = new Scanner(System.in); double d = s.nextDouble(); System.out.println(d); Wheel w = new Wheel(d); System.out.println(w.getCircumfe rence()); System.out.println(w.getArea()); }}

    See if you can figure out what they do?
 
 
 
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