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    i am going on to further education at college. in the future i wish to be a lawyer or a barrister. i am confused of what i need to do to acheive this. what do i need to study? how well do i have to do? do i need to go to a law school? is there one locally? but the main question is what i need to study to go on to do what i want. replys i would be greatfull for. thank you
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    (Original post by jojotheman50)
    is there one locally?
    yep.
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    (Original post by jojotheman50)
    i am going on to further education at college. in the future i wish to be a lawyer or a barrister. i am confused of what i need to do to acheive this. what do i need to study? how well do i have to do? do i need to go to a law school? is there one locally? but the main question is what i need to study to go on to do what i want. replys i would be greatfull for. thank you
    What academic stage are you at? What qualifications do you have?
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    (Original post by Lord Huntroyde)
    What academic stage are you at? What qualifications do you have?
    He has said he is going to further education college (which is sixth form)
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    There are many ways you can become a solicitor/barrister. Most Universities require A-levels. I can explain more about a part time route, which is what I have done. "Earn while you learn" so they say!

    I've set out below the routes you can take and what is involved. If you do the second of these routes, you do not need to have A-levels, just basic education with good GCSEs. My first ever law exam was a GCSE and I found this extremely useful to start off with, but you don't need it. Aim for good marks in maths and english. If you do do A-levels at college, you can do A-level law as well.

    Depends on your area of specialism you want to go into as to what other exams you want to do. Be broad in case you don't end up in the law. If you are doing A-levels, consider things that would be useful in law as well as out of law, such as accountancy (companies like numeracy and you do have to do solicitor's accounts later on in studies on your way to becoming a solicitor) and you may go into banking either in or outside of the law. Hope that makes sense. You want things that have two sides to them. Law is useful anyway, as an A-level. I think it's a good one to have whatever you end up doing! You might want to look at business exams as well.

    If you have A-levels, apply to do a law degree part time. Takes four years. Three years full time. Check out whether you have a university doing this in you area. If not, try Open University. Some Universities don't require A-levels. I don't know what your qualifications are, but you can do some investigative work to see who accepts what.

    Then you need to do the Legal Practice Course (Legal Practice Course) - warning - costs around £6,500 unless you get a sponsor! Can be done part time - again, check with Universities. Two years part time, 1 year full time.

    After this, you need to do training for two years as a Trainee Solicitor (used to be Articles). These can be difficult to obtain. You would need to find out a firm of solicitors who will take you on. Still strong competition and most firms require you to have a 2-1 in your degree. Some may or may not pay for your LPC. Then, a short course of a couple of weeks called the Professional Skills Course and job done! This is the route commonly known as the "degree route".

    OR, there is another way. You can become a student of the Institute of Legal Executives. You don't really need A-levels but a good all round education with GCSEs would be helpful. If not, apply as a "mature student" depending on your age.

    This course takes four years - is only done part time but can be done at a local college or by correspondence. First two years is A-level standard, second two years is of a degree standard. If you pass, you become a Member of the Institute of Legal Executives. Then, you do two years in your chosen field after which time, you become a Fellow. Then you can go on to do the Legal Practice Course which, after completion of the Professional Skills Course (which is a short course of two weeks or so), you become a solicitor. No need to do training as your two years as a Member substitutes this. This route is commonly known as the ILEX route (abbreviated for the Institute of Legal Executives).


    If you want to be a barrister, do your degree and then you need to get pupilage (which is usually unpaid for a year). A barrister takes you under his wing in chambers and you sit at the four Inns of Court for dinner! All necessary apparently. I am not sure if this route has changed - but you can easily get info on it if you wanted to check it out. Depends if you become a solicitor or barrister.



    (Original post by jojotheman50)
    i am going on to further education at college. in the future i wish to be a lawyer or a barrister. i am confused of what i need to do to acheive this. what do i need to study? how well do i have to do? do i need to go to a law school? is there one locally? but the main question is what i need to study to go on to do what i want. replys i would be greatfull for. thank you
 
 
 
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