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    (Original post by trev)
    Alright, I understand now. I just know that HNDs are validated by Edexcel now (in the first place, I didn't know, as they didn't say anything about Edexcel). How about HNCs and foundation degrees? Why are they validated by Edexcel and not the university like other university qualifications?
    I am not sure who foundation degrees are awarded by actually. HNCs are basicaly the same as HNDs but last for just one year. HNDs are considered better for this reason.

    They are qualifications often taught in FE/HE colleges and are designed to allow greater access to higer education. I guess it would complicate things too much if they were awarded by the university.
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    im going to one of the so called "new universities".

    Just a quick question - if I ended up with a first in my BA(hons) history - would this be worth less to an employer than say (and yes this is the extreme) a 3rd class or even a 2:2 from either of the Russel group of universities?
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    It doesn't really matter that much for history. Your 1st will be better if they get a 3rd. But that's not the end of it though...the people going to russell group universities tend to have better a levels and better gcses than those who go to a 'new' university.
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    ok - how about this i have 9 GCSE's ranging from A* to B grade ( 2 at B grade) and I am looking at A-level grades of A, B, C

    not the worst set of results are they! oh and i got a scholarship into the 6th form!
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    Then you have nothing to worry about . If you gonna go into teaching then its better to have a 1st rather than a 3rd from a russell group university of even a G5 university. My teacher at my indepedent college is head of a department and she went to middlesex university, it doesn't really matter for your course. Aslong as you get a good degree and you enjoy the uni life there, you shouldn't worry about it
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    The issue about employment is much more than the university you attend. If that was the case then all those spaces on application forms for further details would be missing. Employers will want to know about what you have done in addition to getting your degree. What extra experiences you have had. Many employers will only be looking for 'graduates', maybe a level of degree will be specified. When you have your degree you've earned that tick on the mark sheet and they move on to other issues. That's where they distinguish between the candidates.
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    (Original post by ancientone)
    The issue about employment is much more than the university you attend. If that was the case then all those spaces on application forms for further details would be missing. Employers will want to know about what you have done in addition to getting your degree. What extra experiences you have had. Many employers will only be looking for 'graduates', maybe a level of degree will be specified. When you have your degree you've earned that tick on the mark sheet and they move on to other issues. That's where they distinguish between the candidates.
    Depends on the job.

    Law at greenwhich vs law at UCL/LSE

    both with 1st class honours, the candidate will win from the g5 universities assuming all other factors are controlled.
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    (Original post by ancientone)
    Some of the arguments in this thread just reek of snobbery - and it's nothing new. .
    It's not snobbery, it's realism. No one is denying that, for certain subjects, some of these new unis appear to out-perform their more esteemed colleagues. However, in many traditional subjects- I'll use Law as that's what I study- the university counts MASSIVELY, and employers will tell you as much straight out. It is of course true to say that there are a number of other variables- experience, 'extra-curricular' stuff, sporting interests, personality etc etc. Those things all have to be in place too. But increasing numbers are finding that they have a degree which, in the real world, is not helping them one jot. It's not their fault, it's the government.
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    (Original post by Jonesy038)
    It's not snobbery, it's realism. No one is denying that, for certain subjects, some of these new unis appear to out-perform their more esteemed colleagues. However, in many traditional subjects- I'll use Law as that's what I study- the university counts MASSIVELY, and employers will tell you as much straight out. It is of course true to say that there are a number of other variables- experience, 'extra-curricular' stuff, sporting interests, personality etc etc. Those things all have to be in place too. But increasing numbers are finding that they have a degree which, in the real world, is not helping them one jot. It's not their fault, it's the government.

    I can't argue about your specific subject, you obviously know more about it than I do. However the general point I'm trying to make still holds. Once the holding of a degree is etablished then it's the other stuff that matters in making appointments. Also in many jobs, and I accept it's not all, there are things called job descriptions, person specifications etc., and it's about matching the individuals to those criteria. Once you meet the degree level criteria it's about the other issues. The vast majority of employers in the public and private sector operate in this way. It might not be the case for everyone, but for most people the points hold true. Incidentally, I'm not arguing that a degree is a passport to a 'good' job or post - it isn't and it never has been.
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    (Original post by Jonesy038)
    It's not snobbery, it's realism. No one is denying that, for certain subjects, some of these new unis appear to out-perform their more esteemed colleagues. However, in many traditional subjects- I'll use Law as that's what I study- the university counts MASSIVELY, and employers will tell you as much straight out. It is of course true to say that there are a number of other variables- experience, 'extra-curricular' stuff, sporting interests, personality etc etc. Those things all have to be in place too. But increasing numbers are finding that they have a degree which, in the real world, is not helping them one jot. It's not their fault, it's the government.
    Truesay, people don't apply to top universities for no reason...
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    (Original post by ancientone)
    Some of the arguments in this thread just reek of snobbery - and it's nothing new. This whole 'new' university issue has been around for 50 years-when places like Keele were established it was said then, similarly it was raised with the technological universities (anyone want to criticise Loughborough in its areas of expertise now), then places like York were called the 'glass' universities deprecatingly. Then it was the turn of the poor old Polys, now the ex colleges. Every change has led to an outburst of snobbery by those unis already established. Incidentally there are many departments at more modern unis that out perform the more traditional unis. It's about what is relevant to you. If that's a new Uni then go for it and don't let snobbery get in your way.
    The 60s Universities were called the "Glass Plate" universities due to their architecture as a contrast to the "Red Brick" universities, not out of snobbery.
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    (Original post by magicalsausage)
    The 60s Universities were called the "Glass Plate" universities due to their architecture as a contrast to the "Red Brick" universities, not out of snobbery.
    True the name came out of the architecture, but the point I'm trying to make is that this was then corrupted at the time to be a means of denigration. As has been every other term whenever Higher Education has changed.
 
 
 
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