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    (Original post by rh209230)
    Thank you for telling my degree is highly academic, but I think that considering I am the one WITH the degree, you aren't really in much of a position to tell me.

    Lets face it, it isn't worth much if you aren't fluent in it, not in the job market.
    Here's why:
    If you want to apply to jobs using your degree, most of them are looking for fluent Japanese speakers.
    Employer: What is your degree?
    You: Japanese Studies
    Employer: Oh, so you speak Japanese
    You; Not really...

    Also, there is not much you can do with a Japanese degree other than language jobs. So therefore, yes, it is useless if your Japanese is mediocre and you want to go into something else.. because bottom line is, you can't. If you really want to ignore my advice and take Japanese at Manchester then I suggest you at least take another subject along side it, give yourself SOME chance in life.

    You get my point?
    Sure its useful in terms of the fact I can speak a bit of Japanese.
    But really, after spending near £40 k and putting A LOT of hard work into it, you would expect to be a little closer to fluent.

    As the other poster said, I'm not asking to be native fluent. But some people on our course can barely string a sentence together... after 4 years of so called teaching. If you can't see the problem with that then there is no helping you.

    Please come back and speak to me when you, too, have a useless degree. There is nothing academic about what I have been doing for the last 4 years.
    Peak times you having.
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    Right, Summer Holidays are here so time to start preparing myself for the degree by learning some Japanese! XD

    Does anyone have any useful / amazing (free) online resources that you've used?
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    Tae Kim's Japanese Grammar Guide is pretty good for grammar and getting hiragana/katakana down.
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    Only semi-related, but to all those taking the JLPT tomorrow, best of luck!
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    (Original post by avila)
    Only semi-related, but to all those taking the JLPT tomorrow, best of luck!
    On that note, out of interest, has anyone here done any jlpt level yet? I've done and passes N4 last December.
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    Out of curiosity, why did you guys decide to study Japanese as a degree at university?
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    (Original post by Ruadhan)
    On that note, out of interest, has anyone here done any jlpt level yet? I've done and passes N4 last December.
    I did N5 at SOAS today and found it pretty easy. The exam room was pretty full; only three candidates or so no-showed. Too bad it'll take until September to get the results. My parents still think I'm wasting my time with this "Japanese stuff" and tell me I should get a "real job". Maybe this'll change their mind a bit. :|


    (Original post by Azimuth)
    Out of curiosity, why did you guys decide to study Japanese as a degree at university?
    Since I'm fluent in English and German and have a degree in CS, Japanese Studies should put me on a path to becoming a trilingual technical translator. I hope. :x
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    (Original post by Azimuth)
    Out of curiosity, why did you guys decide to study Japanese as a degree at university?
    I've been self studying for 6 years so I decided it'd be good to take a course in it and actually make something of my 6 years of study. (: I plan to work with it for a career such as translating or teaching. Plus, I absolutely adore the language/culture.
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    Hey guys I was just wondering if anyone had thought about get a voice recorder to have in lectures etc? I was thinking about it and if any present students could tell me if they're a good idea that would be lovely!

    Thanks
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    (Original post by mmm-dorayaki)
    Hey guys I was just wondering if anyone had thought about get a voice recorder to have in lectures etc? I was thinking about it and if any present students could tell me if they're a good idea that would be lovely!

    Thanks
    While I haven't used one for Japanese Studies in particular, I've done it a few times during my previous degree. In practice, I never really re-listend to lectures and just used my written notes instead since that was faster than skipping through a 50 minute voice recording.

    I do know of a few foreign students who used voice recorders quite successfully because the lecturers spoke too fast or had a weird accent. They would re-listen to lectures afterwards to make sure they understood them correctly.

    Given that, it sounds like an interesting thing to try for language learning. Thinking back, it probably wouldn't have worked too well in the Japanese class I took up to this June though, because our teacher used the room's smart board quite extensively and later put what she wrote on it up on Blackboard. In conjunction with written notes, that was sufficient to keep up.

    Have you done a VARK Questionnaire before? If you're an aural learner, it might really help you. I learn best by reading/writing and studying visual things, so it's not really something for me.

    Do you have a mobile phone? If it's recent, it will definitely have a voice recorder of some sort built in. Put the phone on silent so it doesn't ring, then just try it out and see if it works for you. If it does, consider investing in a dedicated unit with better quality. This is one I saw others use a lot. Sady, I can't tell you the price.
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    (Original post by rh209230)

    -Once they've decided you should get a 2:2, you're getting a 2:2, and there's nothing you can do about it. Sorry.
    .
    I'm sorry, but by your post you seem to be blaming the school and teachers for your low grade, where really, if you don't put the effort in outside lessons, you deserve the grade you got. Sorry, but don't place blame on the school and teachers, when by your attitude, it's most likely you're own fault... You're not going to become fluent by just sitting in lessons and not putting effort in, the teachers don't just place knowledge in your head. I'm sorry, but you seem a bit arrogant.
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    Hmmm see I was thinking of getting one tooooo.... but the decent ones are hefty prices for something I might not need. I guess it's something that you're better off deciding on once you're there. See if you can manage without it, or see if others are benefitting from it, etc.
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    (Original post by JoelleAlice)
    I'm sorry, but by your post you seem to be blaming the school and teachers for your low grade, where really, if you don't put the effort in outside lessons, you deserve the grade you got. Sorry, but don't place blame on the school and teachers, when by your attitude, it's most likely you're own fault... You're not going to become fluent by just sitting in lessons and not putting effort in, the teachers don't just place knowledge in your head. I'm sorry, but you seem a bit arrogant.
    QFT, A language degree requires that you practise amongst others that speak the language. Don't know how it was when you first started, but I know this year and the last, there's been plenty of opportunity with Japanese exchange students to practice your speaking skills at Manchester University. Like the above said, if you didn't put the time in, you deserve what you got. Enjoy your employment.
    That goes for anyone else that thinks a language degree is a bit of a doss. If you don't put the hours or effort in, all you'll come out with is a sheet of paper and no language or employable skills. Four years to a language course, make the most of it.
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    (Original post by JoelleAlice)
    I'm sorry, but by your post you seem to be blaming the school and teachers for your low grade, where really, if you don't put the effort in outside lessons, you deserve the grade you got. Sorry, but don't place blame on the school and teachers, when by your attitude, it's most likely you're own fault... You're not going to become fluent by just sitting in lessons and not putting effort in, the teachers don't just place knowledge in your head. I'm sorry, but you seem a bit arrogant.
    Well what a shame I forgot my original log in details, but given this post, I just couldn't resist making a new account so I could reply.
    A bit hypocritical of you to call people arrogant, considering you are the one sitting here in judgement, telling me I did not work for 4 years and of course the teachers are not to blame at all. I'm sorry, were you sat in the class room with us? Because if you were, and you saw me slacking off, then of course you are entitled to sit here in judgement. But actually, I think you weren't.
    So, unless every single person on my course did absolutely nothing for 5 years, never met with a language partner and never tried hard in class, I think I am quite entitled to say that the university IS to blame for the state of the course.
    'Most likely' my fault, you say. Your post is very interesting, because I have no idea who you are, but apparently you know me and I never did any work. Your post is a big a joke as the course itself!
    In future, I suggest that you don't make posts like these, until you have sat where we have sat and endured four years of absolute rubbish like we did. THEN, and only then, do you have the right to presume to know about other people's experiences.

    If you are a Japanese Studies student at Manchester, come and see me at the end of your fourth year, when you are working in the pound shop. I will be more than happy to say 'I told you so.'

    And just for your information, I got a perfectly good end result for my degree, but that does not change the fact that the course was a shambles, and it was all my own work. Thank you for knowing it all though!
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    (Original post by Kalysto)
    QFT, A language degree requires that you practise amongst others that speak the language. Don't know how it was when you first started, but I know this year and the last, there's been plenty of opportunity with Japanese exchange students to practice your speaking skills at Manchester University. Like the above said, if you didn't put the time in, you deserve what you got. Enjoy your employment.
    That goes for anyone else that thinks a language degree is a bit of a doss. If you don't put the hours or effort in, all you'll come out with is a sheet of paper and no language or employable skills. Four years to a language course, make the most of it.
    Of course there are language partners, and I assure you that people in our year used them as much as possible.
    HOWEVER, you might also want to think about the fact that people are paying around £30,000 for this course as a whole. Now, I could go into Manchester and find a Japanese speaking person for free, without being on a degree course. So what exactly are we paying this money for? Of course there are people who put no effort in, but I can assure you that I was not one of them. If you are happy to be taken for a ride by these 'lecturers' then that is your problem. They put zero effort into the final year course, and everybody's grades were down to their own hard work, I did not hear anybody thanking these so-called teachers.
    Don't be so quick to judge before you get to fourth year. You will get your comeuppance, enjoy your employment too, I have no sympathy for you!

    And where exactly did I say it was a doss? It seems a lot of people on here think they know a little bit too much for my liking. Go and play in the traffic.
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    I really need some help please.

    I have applied for 'Japanese Studies' at Sheffield University, however I am wondering whether to change to 'Linguistics & Japanese Studies' because from my research, the course opens many more doors for a career. I have never studied Linguistics before and was wondering how scientific it is and whether it is possible to start from scratch on the degree?
    Also, I understand 'Japanese Studies' is a difficult degree to study but how hard is the 'Linguistics & Japanese Studies' compared?
    And if possible, what are the exams like/what is their content and how hard is the coursework? Are there a lot of scientific 'terms' to remember? etc


    I would really, really appreciate answers to this as I am trying to find out as much as possible and it is August already!
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    (Original post by Digital_Love)
    I really need some help please.

    I have applied for 'Japanese Studies' at Sheffield University, however I am wondering whether to change to 'Linguistics & Japanese Studies' because from my research, the course opens many more doors for a career. I have never studied Linguistics before and was wondering how scientific it is and whether it is possible to start from scratch on the degree?
    Also, I understand 'Japanese Studies' is a difficult degree to study but how hard is the 'Linguistics & Japanese Studies' compared?
    And if possible, what are the exams like/what is their content and how hard is the coursework? Are there a lot of scientific 'terms' to remember? etc


    I would really, really appreciate answers to this as I am trying to find out as much as possible and it is August already!
    I was wondering this as well because I thought perhaps Linguistics might help me to better my use of English (useful for a translator!) and I'm not as confident in essay-heavy modules such as History and Literature (Linguistics probably has just as many though...), but then again I think knowing more about their culture is incredibly useful in the long run for utilising the language better due to having a more in-depth understanding of their society. So I'll probably stick to single honours, still interested to hear what sort of things you do on the Linguistics side of it though! I already decided that I'm gonna use my 20 elective credits to take German 1A/1B as well, it's my favourite European language. :dance:

    In fact, my ultimate dream was to do Japanese/German dual honours but I don't have an A level in German so I have to stick with electives.
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    (Original post by GuineaPrig)
    I was wondering this as well because I thought perhaps Linguistics might help me to better my use of English (useful for a translator!) and I'm not as confident in essay-heavy modules such as History and Literature (Linguistics probably has just as many though...), but then again I think knowing more about their culture is incredibly useful in the long run for utilising the language better due to having a more in-depth understanding of their society. So I'll probably stick to single honours, still interested to hear what sort of things you do on the Linguistics side of it though! I already decided that I'm gonna use my 20 elective credits to take German 1A/1B as well, it's my favourite European language. :dance:

    In fact, my ultimate dream was to do Japanese/German dual honours but I don't have an A level in German so I have to stick with electives.
    I understand studying linguistics can open many more doors than just studying japanese studies. I too am interested in translation and interpretation but I wonder if it is possible to be successful in either of these careers without a post-graduate qualification in a specialised subject/after graduating from single Japanese Studies. What do you think?
    I love technology, films, gaming, music, anything media related really or to do with gadgets and I wonder if I can pursue a career working in these industries with translation/interpretation with just Japanese Studies.
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    Eek, well I'm going to study Japanese at Manchester. Really, really hoping it isn't as bad as rh209230 says...o.O
    They say others should apply to different unis and include Sheffield. However, I have a friend who is also a graduate of Japanese Studies at Sheffield and he says it is utter, dismal, rubbish. No support, sent him to a random place in Japan on the third year, and he's left the course with minimal Japanese. I can have a conversation with him but he's so unconfident he won't even talk to my Japanese dad. So it sounds like he's in a similar situation to rh209230! Also, I really wanted to get into SOAS but they didn't even get back to me before the university reply deadline and I know that's happened to other people too. So no choice really, Manchester is my only hope! xD
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    (Original post by terujoan)
    Eek, well I'm going to study Japanese at Manchester. Really, really hoping it isn't as bad as rh209230 says...o.O
    They say others should apply to different unis and include Sheffield. However, I have a friend who is also a graduate of Japanese Studies at Sheffield and he says it is utter, dismal, rubbish. No support, sent him to a random place in Japan on the third year, and he's left the course with minimal Japanese. I can have a conversation with him but he's so unconfident he won't even talk to my Japanese dad. So it sounds like he's in a similar situation to rh209230! Also, I really wanted to get into SOAS but they didn't even get back to me before the university reply deadline and I know that's happened to other people too. So no choice really, Manchester is my only hope! xD
    The Sheffield Japanese Studies 2011 group on Failbook had a "Ruby Fitzsimmons" echo sentiments similar to the ones of your friend. However, she eventually admitted that she didn't put in any effort and eventually ended up losing the support of her teachers due to this (which is understandable). Has your friend done more than the minimum amount of work required?

    After hours of stalking old forum threads and performing carefully constructed Google searches, it seems that, at least at Sheffield, which uni you go to in Japan depends entirely on your first year result even though it officially doesn't count. Am I right in assuming that your friend did poorly in his first year exams?

    From what I can piece together, it appears that those who are complaining the loudest about the course are those expecting to learn Japanese by osmosis or something like that. It should be obvious that a university-level course works rather differently. Lectures and tutorials/seminars primarily serve to guide, supplement, and validate the progress of one's own study.

    I'm sure that even Manchester is not the hell-hole it was described to be in one of the previous posts. There's a whole lot of FUD going around on the Internet and unless there are several independent reports, I think it's best not to take any of it too seriously.

    Given everything I have found out about Japanese Studies in general until now, it seems that, in my humble opinion, those who want a Japanese course with more intensive "hand holding" are probably better off studying at a dedicated language school like Yamasa or taking private lessons. Those who are prepared to invest the required amount of time to revise and then go beyond what was taught in lectures should be able to study Japanese at university without major problems.

    We'll find out if that hypothesis holds about a month from now.
 
 
 
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