ToLiveInADream
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#1
I have my two German GCSEs tomorrow and the only revision I've done is in class. I'm so worried I'm going to fail Listening because I got a D for my mock in November (but an A* for writing).

Any tips for listening? It just feels like I miss everything they say and/or get mixed up with synonyms. Also, is it still possible to get an A* if I have A*s for writing, speaking & reading but a B/C for listening?

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
scott18044
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#2
Report 5 years ago
#2
On AQA's course, somebody can sit foundation listening, higher reading and still get an A*, because of the weighting of each section (though you would have to do very well on the other three sections). I'm assuming that you're going for higher if you're thinking about a B/C for listening (unless I'm mistaken and you can get a B on a foundation listening paper), so it is, in theory, definitely still possible.

(If you aren't on AQA, ignore the above :P)

In terms of how to tackle the exam- there are a few things you could try perhaps. The first is use the 5 minutes reading time to make notes on the paper, writing vocabulary that you might expect to hear. If there is a question with three multiple choice answers, write words next to each choice that you would expect to hear, were that the right answer.

I can't remember how applicable this is to German GCSE, but French GCSE uses negatives to try and lure you into putting the wrong answer sometimes. Listen carefully to exactly what they're saying, as sometimes they do lead you up a false trail talking about a wrong answer before hitting you with the right answer. And the only other thing I can really think to say is make full use of the fact that you hear each bit twice.

edit: One other point I just thought to mention is don't lose heart if you can't answer a couple of questions. The paper isn't always arranged exactly easiest questions to hardest and, even within questions, similar things happen. If you struggle to answer part (a) and (b) of question 6 [for example], part (c) may not be as difficult as the other two. If you switch off after struggling with part (b), saying that you can't do this question, you may lose a mark because you fully listened to (c), which you may find easier to tackle.


Viel Glück!
1
reply
ToLiveInADream
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#3
(Original post by scott18044)
On AQA's course, somebody can sit foundation listening, higher reading and still get an A*, because of the weighting of each section (though you would have to do very well on the other three sections). I'm assuming that you're going for higher if you're thinking about a B/C for listening (unless I'm mistaken and you can get a B on a foundation listening paper), so it is, in theory, definitely still possible.

(If you aren't on AQA, ignore the above :P)

In terms of how to tackle the exam- there are a few things you could try perhaps. The first is use the 5 minutes reading time to make notes on the paper, writing vocabulary that you might expect to hear. If there is a question with three multiple choice answers, write words next to each choice that you would expect to hear, were that the right answer.

I can't remember how applicable this is to German GCSE, but French GCSE uses negatives to try and lure you into putting the wrong answer sometimes. Listen carefully to exactly what they're saying, as sometimes they do lead you up a false trail talking about a wrong answer before hitting you with the right answer. And the only other thing I can really think to say is make full use of the fact that you hear each bit twice.

edit: One other point I just thought to mention is don't lose heart if you can't answer a couple of questions. The paper isn't always arranged exactly easiest questions to hardest and, even within questions, similar things happen. If you struggle to answer part (a) and (b) of question 6 [for example], part (c) may not be as difficult as the other two. If you switch off after struggling with part (b), saying that you can't do this question, you may lose a mark because you fully listened to (c), which you may find easier to tackle.


Viel Glück!
This made me feel so much better and more prepared. Thank you! :jive:

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Norwich University of the Arts
    Postgraduate Open Day Postgraduate
    Thu, 23 Jan '20
  • SOAS University of London
    Development Studies, Interdisciplinary Studies, Anthropology and Sociology, Languages, Cultures and Linguistics, Arts, Economics, Law, History, Religions and Philosophies, Politics and International Studies, Finance and Management, East Asian Languages & Cultures Postgraduate
    Sat, 25 Jan '20
  • University of Huddersfield
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 25 Jan '20

How many universities have you heard back from?

0 (95)
12.84%
1 (93)
12.57%
2 (94)
12.7%
19.32%
22.7%
19.86%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed