dwbailey
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Hi, I'm stuck on how to answer this 1 mark question in terms of wording it correctly.
"Explain why the second ionisation energy of boron is higher than the first ionisation energy of boron".
How would you guys word the answer to this so its to the point and gets the mark?
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smozsolution
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You're removing a negatively charged electron from a positively charged ion, you need high energy to overcome the forces of attraction.

Hope that helps
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dwbailey
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Thanks, I was confused to whether it jumping from p orbital to s orbital was the reason
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MedAppli
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(Original post by smozsolution)
You're removing a negatively charged electron from a positively charged ion, you need high energy to overcome the forces of attraction.

Hope that helps
That's not sufficient, you need to talk about how it's in the 2s as opposed to the 2p orbital which is a lower energy, also he ratio between negative and positive charge has increased and so each one is held more closely to the nucleus

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smozsolution
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(Original post by MedAppli)
That's not sufficient, you need to talk about how it's in the 2s as opposed to the 2p orbital which is a lower energy, also he ratio between negative and positive charge has increased and so each one is held more closely to the nucleus

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It's only one mark so I was quite brief with my answer.

Talking about that for a one mark question is a bit long winded.
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MedAppli
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Your answer explains why there is ionization energy and not why one is bigger than the other

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smozsolution
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(Original post by MedAppli)
Your answer explains why there is ionization energy and not why one is bigger than the other

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My answer explains why the second ionisation energy is larger than the first, as per what the question asked.

Have a look here on page 5 under the question "Why are successive ionisation energies always larger?".
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victoria1235
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smozsolution is correct. Basically he/she is trying to say that the energy needed to remove one mole of electrons from one mole of neutral boron gaseous atoms is smaller than that needed to remove one mole of electrons from one mole of gaseous boron ions with a SINGLE positive charge. Due to the stronger electrostatic forces of attraction in the latter case, the second ionisation energy is more endothermic such that the extra attractive force can be overcome. Hope that helps!
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