The-Deadly
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does anybody know what the topics in c2 are, i just want to look at them since im beginning AS maths in september
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gec98
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(Original post by The-Deadly)
does anybody know what the topics in c2 are, i just want to look at them since im beginning AS maths in september
It varies from exam board to exam board but I am on OCR MEI and our C2 topics are
•sequences and series
•differentiation
•integration
•trigonometry
•logarithms and exponentials
•further differentiation and integration
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The-Deadly
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(Original post by gec98)
It varies from exam board to exam board but I am on OCR MEI and our C2 topics are
•sequences and series
•differentiation
•integration
•trigonometry
•logarithms and exponentials
•further differentiation and integration
I would be on edexcel and for calculus, all i know for differentiation is that you times the power by the constant then deduct the power by one and the inverse of this for integration. I know that it goes further than this but what would i be expected to learn next? Can you show me an example and explain?
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gec98
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(Original post by The-Deadly)
I would be on edexcel and for calculus, all i know for differentiation is that you times the power by the constant then deduct the power by one and the inverse of this for integration. I know that it goes further than this but what would i be expected to learn next? Can you show me an example and explain?
Yeah that's more or less the basics of it, differentiation you times by the original power and deduct 1 from the power (so if it is x to the power of 1, it would just be 1 and the x disappears, if there is a number with no x it disappears as it would be multiplied by 0) and integration you add 1 to the power and divide by this new power however you must always remember to do '+c' on the end of an equation due to the reason explained in differentiation where numbers disappear.
To make it harder they use negative powers and fractional powers and that's it really!
I'll dig my textbook out now to see if there's any examples
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Bobjim12
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(Original post by The-Deadly)
I would be on edexcel and for calculus, all i know for differentiation is that you times the power by the constant then deduct the power by one and the inverse of this for integration. I know that it goes further than this but what would i be expected to learn next? Can you show me an example and explain?
You'll be expected to differentiate and thus know what that means (finding the gradient).

They can ask simple question such as find the gradient when x = 1 for example. After finding the value of the gradient, they may ask you to find equations of the tangent or normal to the point where x = 1 on the curve, using dy/dx to help you with this.

Lastly, they will ask you to find stationary points on a curve, where dy/dx = 0, expanding on this, they will ask you to determine whether the stationary point is a maximum or minimum point.

at C2, the powers become fractions occasionally and they may put a power of x being the denominator of a function.
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The-Deadly
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(Original post by Bobjim12)
You'll be expected to differentiate and thus know what that means (finding the gradient).

They can ask simple question such as find the gradient when x = 1 for example. After finding the value of the gradient, they may ask you to find equations of the tangent or normal to the point where x = 1 on the curve, using dy/dx to help you with this.

Lastly, they will ask you to find stationary points on a curve, where dy/dx = 0, expanding on this, they will ask you to determine whether the stationary point is a maximum or minimum point.

at C2, the powers become fractions occasionally and they may put a power of x being the denominator of a function.
Yeah ive tried finding this online but cant, how would i find the maximum minimum and stationary points of an equation?
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Bobjim12
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(Original post by The-Deadly)
Yeah ive tried finding this online but cant, how would i find the maximum minimum and stationary points of an equation?
To find a stationary point, you would equate dy/dx = 0 and solve for x.

then, with a value of x found, differentiate again (hence called the second derivative) and plug in the value of x that you found, if the answer < 0 it is a max point, > 0 a min point, and if = 0 a point of inflexion
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The-Deadly
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(Original post by gec98)
Yeah that's more or less the basics of it, differentiation you times by the original power and deduct 1 from the power (so if it is x to the power of 1, it would just be 1 and the x disappears, if there is a number with no x it disappears as it would be multiplied by 0) and integration you add 1 to the power and divide by this new power however you must always remember to do '+c' on the end of an equation due to the reason explained in differentiation where numbers disappear.
To make it harder they use negative powers and fractional powers and that's it really!
I'll dig my textbook out now to see if there's any examples
How would i go about something like this 2t^-2/3(4t+1)-6t^1/3(4) all over (4t+1)^2
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