Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    It would seem that for all exam boards, or at the very least AQA, there have been changes to the manner in which exams are remarked.

    - 'Change the way exam boards review their marking and moderation of GCSE,AS and A level assessment so errors are corrected, but marks are otherwisenot changed.'

    - 'Make sure any errors in marking GCSEs, AS and A levels are found and
    corrected, in a way that is fair to all students.'

    https://www.gov.uk/government/upload...f_Practice.pdf

    Would anyone be kind enough so as to perhaps try and clear it up as to how they would go about 'correcting errors and yet not changing marks'? Is it that I have not understood the wording of it?

    Would everyone's grades be changed following remarks from now on so as to increase the grade boundaries and thus perhaps drop some people at the limit of a grade into the previous grade? That is what I understand from making the remarks fair for all students, although I really do not think that is what they meant.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    'Require Marking and Moderation Errors7 to be corrected, but not otherwise
    allow marks to be changed'

    So do they mean that, by this, remarks will become ever harder to gain additional marks from? As in, they will not mark the entire paper again, but rather look for mistakes in the previous examiner's correction of the candidate's paper? That is terrible news.
    • TSR Community Team
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Community Team
    (Original post by Caius Filimon)
    It would seem that for all exam boards, or at the very least AQA, there have been changes to the manner in which exams are remarked.

    - 'Change the way exam boards review their marking and moderation of GCSE,AS and A level assessment so errors are corrected, but marks are otherwisenot changed.'

    - 'Make sure any errors in marking GCSEs, AS and A levels are found and
    corrected, in a way that is fair to all students.'

    https://www.gov.uk/government/upload...f_Practice.pdf

    Would anyone be kind enough so as to perhaps try and clear it up as to how they would go about 'correcting errors and yet not changing marks'? Is it that I have not understood the wording of it?

    OK, I was at a conference about exams yesterday with Ofqual so have a fairly good idea of the changes - we'll be putting them together in an article or similar over the next couple of weeks to let everyone know.
    In the past, remarks were conducted by senior examiners who remarked the script in question and their mark stood. There is now an acceptance by Ofqual that mark schemes can sometimes give rise to slightly different but equally valid academic interpretations and there may be cases where there is no absolute 'correct' mark for a candidate. The boards have been told that, from summer 2016, marks should not be changed in these instances, they should change only where the mark schemes has been interpreted incorrectly by the original examiner i.e where an error has been made.

    Would everyone's grades be changed following remarks from now on so as to increase the grade boundaries and thus perhaps drop some people at the limit of a grade into the previous grade? That is what I understand from making the remarks fair for all students, although I really do not think that is what they meant.
    No, the point about fairness derives from the current situation where only certain students or schools can afford remarks. One student may get a mark moved up, many others who will have experienced the same marker, will not.

    (Original post by Caius Filimon)
    'Require Marking and Moderation Errors7 to be corrected, but not otherwise
    allow marks to be changed'

    So do they mean that, by this, remarks will become ever harder to gain additional marks from? As in, they will not mark the entire paper again, but rather look for mistakes in the previous examiner's correction of the candidate's paper? That is terrible news.
    The whole paper will be looked at but marks will only be changed where there is a clear 'error', not a minor difference in 'academic interpretation' between the original marker and the reviewer.
    So yes, it seems likely that less remarks result in changes from this year. But we don't yet know quite how this will play out - where is the line going to be drawn between 'error' and 'legitimate interpretation'?

    I hope this helps a bit. As I say, we hope to clarifying things for everyone soon.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Ofqual decreed the system had to change (for all exam boards) and I think the finer details are still being being argued about - certainly it was the case when I was talking to AQA on Monday.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by The Learn Ranger)
    No, the point about fairness derives from the current situation where only certain students or schools can afford remarks. One student may get a mark moved up, many others who will have experienced the same marker, will not.



    The whole paper will be looked at but marks will only be changed where there is a clear 'error', not a minor difference in 'academic interpretation' between the original marker and the reviewer.
    So yes, it seems likely that less remarks result in changes from this year. But we don't yet know quite how this will play out - where is the line going to be drawn between 'error' and 'legitimate interpretation'?

    I hope this helps a bit. As I say, we hope to clarifying things for everyone soon.
    I see; thank you very much for your reply! It has cleared up quite a few things.

    And I suppose that the minor difference in academic interpretation could, in previous years, work the other way around too, decreasing people's grades due to the new examiner's differing view?

    Or would most exam boards, or at least AQA (as I've heard), do their best to mark as positively as possible as most people getting remarks are close to the grade above and are in desperate need of a couple marks? So in the past differing 'legitimate interpretation' would only exist if it would increase one's mark and not otherwise? Definitely not the easiest of questions to put into words, I'd say.

    I'm especially worried as I might depend on remarks as last year there were pretty significant discrepancies in my initial results and eventual remarks. Most likely due to the fact that I write upwards of 20 pages (font 12) with a weird structure in each of my papers. I use a lot of extra curricular information as well as many (correct) arguments not on the mark schemes in my answers.
    • TSR Community Team
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Community Team
    (Original post by Caius Filimon)
    I see; thank you very much for your reply! It has cleared up quite a few things.

    And I suppose that the minor difference in academic interpretation could, in previous years, work the other way around too, decreasing people's grades due to the new examiner's differing view?

    Yes, marks could go up or down.

    Or would most exam boards, or at least AQA (as I've heard), do their best to mark as positively as possible as most people getting remarks are close to the grade above and are in desperate need of a couple marks? So in the past differing 'legitimate interpretation' would only exist if it would increase one's mark and not otherwise? Definitely not the easiest of questions to put into words, I'd say.

    In my experience exam markers do try to mark positively in all cases. The reviewer would simply mark according to the mark scheme; they wouldn't pay any attention to grading. There may be a psychological effect of the sort you describe - examiners are human.

    I'm especially worried as I might depend on remarks as last year there were pretty significant discrepancies in my initial results and eventual remarks. Most likely due to the fact that I write upwards of 20 pages (font 12) with a weird structure in each of my papers. I use a lot of extra curricular information as well as many (correct) arguments not on the mark schemes in my answers.
    You sound like exactly the sort of candidate that examiners might find tricky to assess. However, they should recognise quality and if they're not sure when marking, they can ask for advice. I would wait until the results before you start thinking about remarks!

    I hope the results go really well for you.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by The Learn Ranger)
    You sound like exactly the sort of candidate that examiners might find tricky to assess. However, they should recognise quality and if they're not sure when marking, they can ask for advice. I would wait until the results before you start thinking about remarks!

    I hope the results go really well for you.
    Haha, yup. I'm not a native speaker either, so my sentence structure might be dubious at times too.

    Once again, thank you for your replies and help! I really appreciate it.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What's your favourite Christmas sweets?
    Help with your A-levels

    All the essentials

    The adventure begins mug

    Student life: what to expect

    What it's really like going to uni

    Rosette

    Essay expert

    Learn to write like a pro with our ultimate essay guide.

    Uni match

    Uni match

    Our tool will help you find the perfect course for you

    Study planner

    Create a study plan

    Get your head around what you need to do and when with the study planner tool.

    Study planner

    Resources by subject

    Everything from mind maps to class notes.

    Hands typing

    Degrees without fees

    Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

    A student doing homework

    Study tips from A* students

    Students who got top grades in their A-levels share their secrets

    Study help links and info

    Can you help? Study help unanswered threadsRules and posting guidelines

    Sponsored content:

    HEAR

    HEAR

    Find out how a Higher Education Achievement Report can help you prove your achievements.

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.