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    does anyone know whether depression goes away over time, or if it was to be treated using medication? Just i feel uncomfortable bringing it up with doctors of family members. I know it might get better if i talk to someone about it but im afraid that they'll shrug it off as an overreaction...
    • #2
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    hi
    depression never really goes away imo, but it can be improved if you try your best
    i’ve been extremely depressed between ages 13 and 17, and every day was a horrible day. i would consider the good days to be rare and just that- good days in a period of horrible days
    tbh the best decision i made was to stop seeing it like that. nothing realistically changed at first, except my perspective. i started seeing it as a good period of time with intermittent bad days, even if at first it was the exact same s**t.
    now i only have occasional depressive thoughts, but it improved significantly, considering i started out with months of depression.
    my best advice is:
    1. change your perspective towards a positive one
    2. make your bed/ declutter your room if you aren’t doing it. even starting to do it once a week on a regular schedule helps.for me, having order in my life made me less stressed
    3. find someone to talk to, even if it’s an online friend or someone you know irl. vent to them or keep a journal if you can’t find someone. clear your head out of the negative feelings anytime you get them

    i could never get access to medication, so maybe people who use it have another “solution” than me
    best of luck though and take care 💗
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    It's so important to talk to someone about it. I totally understand the fear that you'll be shrugged off, but finding someone to talk to will really help.

    I'm currently on a form of medication and I think that depression- proper, clinical depression that comes from a chemical imbalance- never really does go away. It's one of those things that can be managed, but not completely cured. It's worth having a chat to your GP at some point if you really think it might be an option for you.

    I think everybody goes through periods of depressed feelings every now and again, it's just finding ways to cope and get through it or seeking help if it's something that really starts to take over your life.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    does anyone know whether depression goes away over time, or if it was to be treated using medication? Just i feel uncomfortable bringing it up with doctors of family members. I know it might get better if i talk to someone about it but im afraid that they'll shrug it off as an overreaction...
    imo. If you think you already need proffessional advice like if you're already having troubles in your daily routine or having a break down like hurting yourself or worst thinking of killing yourself, better of take courage o going to a mental health doctor. Don't be shy nor afraid to talk bout it to someone nearest to your life like relatives, closest friends and loved ones. It will not go away overtime, but in process, you yourself is the only help you need. KEEP ON PRAYING. He is the greatest doctor and comforter.
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    Anonymous, I understand that you are in a scary place. I encourage you to see someone, if not multiple people so that you can get help. I assure you that you will find someone that will be willing to help. What you are facing is not uncommon or unheard of. There are answers out there waiting for you. Take it one step at a time. I believe in you!
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    (Original post by SpangleMagnet)
    It's so important to talk to someone about it. I totally understand the fear that you'll be shrugged off, but finding someone to talk to will really help.

    I'm currently on a form of medication and I think that depression- proper, clinical depression that comes from a chemical imbalance- never really does go away. It's one of those things that can be managed, but not completely cured. It's worth having a chat to your GP at some point if you really think it might be an option for you.

    I think everybody goes through periods of depressed feelings every now and again, it's just finding ways to cope and get through it or seeking help if it's something that really starts to take over your life.
    How easy was it for you to get on medication?
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    (Original post by crimniam)
    How easy was it for you to get on medication?
    Honestly? Not that easy.

    The first time I was prescribed anything (around ten years ago) my at-the-time GP really didn't understand, so prescribed me something, then if a month later it wasn't 'working' would put me on something else etc etc.

    I'd been after some form of medicated help for around two years this time, and didn't get my initial prescription til September last year after both changing doctors and already finding myself private counselling/talk therapy to go alongside it.

    The unfortunate thing is that the 'postcode lottery' the media talk about when it comes to healthcare really does factor into the quality of mental health support you can access. Where I currently live is awful for mental health and until I found it myself I was basically unable to get any form of counselling or therapy on the NHS. I do really think that did factor in the GP's decision to give me a prescription, though.
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    I'll be honest. My first port of call was online.
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    (Original post by SpangleMagnet)
    Honestly? Not that easy.

    The first time I was prescribed anything (around ten years ago) my at-the-time GP really didn't understand, so prescribed me something, then if a month later it wasn't 'working' would put me on something else etc etc.

    I'd been after some form of medicated help for around two years this time, and didn't get my initial prescription til September last year after both changing doctors and already finding myself private counselling/talk therapy to go alongside it.

    The unfortunate thing is that the 'postcode lottery' the media talk about when it comes to healthcare really does factor into the quality of mental health support you can access. Where I currently live is awful for mental health and until I found it myself I was basically unable to get any form of counselling or therapy on the NHS. I do really think that did factor in the GP's decision to give me a prescription, though.
    Lmao, are you serious? You can get a prescription for that crap (antidepressants) in 10 seconds, from any doctor.

    (Original post by crimniam)
    How easy was it for you to get on medication?
    See above. It's too easy. All you have to do is list a couple of symptoms of depression and they prescribe them to you, no questions asked.
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    (Original post by Clockrice)
    Depression isn't a thing, it doesn't exist. All it is is a built up of sadness which you have been unable to process and evaporate away. You don't need any medication for it. You have two operations you can start going to Church and believe in God, this will help you actively evaporate you sadness or you can go to cognitive therapy which will enable to passively evaporate your sadness. I would say first step should be to become a Christian and start believing in God and Jesus, reading the bible and getting emotional nourishment from it. This is the quickest way to process your sadness.
    depression is very much “a thing”, and millions of people struggle with it. please don’t dismiss something (scientifically proven) as untrue in order to push religious propaganda. congratulations if the word of god worked for you, though
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    (Original post by Clockrice)
    Depression isn't a thing, it doesn't exist. All it is is a built up of sadness which you have been unable to process and evaporate away. You don't need any medication for it. You have two operations you can start going to Church and believe in God, this will help you actively evaporate you sadness or you can go to cognitive therapy which will enable to passively evaporate your sadness. I would say first step should be to become a Christian and start believing in God and Jesus, reading the bible and getting emotional nourishment from it. This is the quickest way to process your sadness.
    I understand many religious people consider it their mission in life to be as zealous as possible in their attempts to convert the masses.
    But you are making assertions like "you don't need any medication", just "start believing in God ... reading the bible".
    This risks misleading vulnerable people and could put their lives at risk.
    Are you a mental health doctor?
    Or even an ordained minister of a mainstream church?
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    (Original post by SpangleMagnet)
    Honestly? Not that easy.

    The first time I was prescribed anything (around ten years ago) my at-the-time GP really didn't understand, so prescribed me something, then if a month later it wasn't 'working' would put me on something else etc etc.

    I'd been after some form of medicated help for around two years this time, and didn't get my initial prescription til September last year after both changing doctors and already finding myself private counselling/talk therapy to go alongside it.

    The unfortunate thing is that the 'postcode lottery' the media talk about when it comes to healthcare really does factor into the quality of mental health support you can access. Where I currently live is awful for mental health and until I found it myself I was basically unable to get any form of counselling or therapy on the NHS. I do really think that did factor in the GP's decision to give me a prescription, though.
    How old were you?
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    Off and on medication since 1963 when I was diagnosed at 15.
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    (Original post by Clockrice)
    Depression isn't a thing, it doesn't exist. All it is is a built up of sadness which you have been unable to process and evaporate away. You don't need any medication for it. You have two operations you can start going to Church and believe in God, this will help you actively evaporate you sadness or you can go to cognitive therapy which will enable to passively evaporate your sadness. I would say first step should be to become a Christian and start believing in God and Jesus, reading the bible and getting emotional nourishment from it. This is the quickest way to process your sadness.
    B.itch, get out.
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    Depression exists and it is a really serious mental problem. A person needs support and advice from family, friends and health professionals.
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    (Original post by Ciel.)
    Lmao, are you serious? You can get a prescription for that crap (antidepressants) in 10 seconds, from any doctor.


    See above. It's too easy. All you have to do is list a couple of symptoms of depression and they prescribe them to you, no questions asked.
    This is not true, at all. Like I said; it took me a long time, and it very much depends on your doctor, your NHS trust and all sorts of things.

    (Original post by crimniam)
    How old were you?
    First time, around 18-19. I was 27 this time around, been on them for just over a year, gradually increasing my dosage. Will probably have one more dosage increase in the next couple of months.
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    (Original post by SpangleMagnet)
    This is not true, at all. Like I said; it took me a long time, and it very much depends on your doctor, your NHS trust and all sorts of things.



    First time, around 18-19. I was 27 this time around, been on them for just over a year, gradually increasing my dosage. Will probably have one more dosage increase in the next couple of months.
    It is. 10 years is a long time. Things must have changed a lot. Book an appointment and see for yourself. Or maybe you just aren't very convincing...
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    (Original post by Ciel.)
    It is. 10 years is a long time. Things must have changed a lot. Book an appointment and see for yourself. Or maybe you just aren't very convincing...
    ... I'm on medication now. If you had read what I posted, I was prescribed them last year after 2 years of asking. It's nothing to do with how 'convincing' you are (and I'm not going to be bated to go into details of my personal battle with mental health) and all to do with the doctor you have and how well trained/experienced they are with mental health issues.

    I'm glad it seems to be so easy where you are. That doesn't change the fact that it is not like that in other places around the UK. Mental health is something that is seen differently from NHS Trust to NHS Trust; some of them value it highly and so will take patients seriously and are more likely to offer or even be able to offer treatment, some of them are completely the opposite.
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    (Original post by Ciel.)
    It is. 10 years is a long time. Things must have changed a lot. Book an appointment and see for yourself. Or maybe you just aren't very convincing...
    Most GP’s would rather shove a prescription in your hand than make the effort to do anything else. It was only after I gave my evidence to the Government Historical Institutional Abuse Inquiry that I was able to access counselling.
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    (Original post by SpangleMagnet)
    ... I'm on medication now. If you had read what I posted, I was prescribed them last year after 2 years of asking. It's nothing to do with how 'convincing' you are (and I'm not going to be bated to go into details of my personal battle with mental health) and all to do with the doctor you have and how well trained/experienced they are with mental health issues.

    I'm glad it seems to be so easy where you are. That doesn't change the fact that it is not like that in other places around the UK. Mental health is something that is seen differently from NHS Trust to NHS Trust; some of them value it highly and so will take patients seriously and are more likely to offer or even be able to offer treatment, some of them are completely the opposite.
    No, no, no. It's not a good thing at all. They are being prescribed even to people that simply suffer from low mood, too. It's a disaster. The history is repeating itself.
 
 
 
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