Spirometer -Unit 6 investigation

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Leah.J
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#1
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#1
I understand how a spirometer works but I don't understand how increasing the temperature reduces the breathing rate in part bii.
I understand that this is the environmental temperature we're considering but I still don't understand how a higher environmental temp=lower breathing rate
https://qualifications.pearson.com/c...e_20130514.pdf

https://qualifications.pearson.com/c...c_20130815.pdf
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slightly_edited
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As far as I understand the heat speeds up rate of reaction and therefore kinetic energy. Cellular respiration increases along with this. If cellular respiration increases so does breathing rate. Hope that made sense.
(Original post by Leah.J)
I understand how a spirometer works but I don't understand how increasing the temperature reduces the breathing rate in part bii.
I understand that this is the environmental temperature we're considering but I still don't understand how a higher environmental temp=lower breathing rate
https://qualifications.pearson.com/c...e_20130514.pdf

https://qualifications.pearson.com/c...c_20130815.pdf
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Leah.J
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#3
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(Original post by slightly_edited)
As far as I understand the heat speeds up rate of reaction and therefore kinetic energy. Cellular respiration increases along with this. If cellular respiration increases so does breathing rate. Hope that made sense.
That's what I thought too, but the mark scheme says that the higher temperature decreases the breathing rate which is why I'm confused
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slightly_edited
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#4
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I thought I replied to this but I've missed it. Lets hope they aren't referring to temperatures high enough to denature enzymes and thus reducing breathing rate. Do let me know if you find out the correct answer. Good luck for tomorrow and the rest of the exams.(tomorrow for me).
(Original post by Leah.J)
That's what I thought too, but the mark scheme says that the higher temperature decreases the breathing rate which is why I'm confused
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Leah.J
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#5
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#5
(Original post by slightly_edited)
I thought I replied to this but I've missed it. Lets hope they aren't referring to temperatures high enough to denature enzymes and thus reducing breathing rate. Do let me know if you find out the correct answer. Good luck for tomorrow and the rest of the exams.(tomorrow for me).
Someone told me this : When the environmental temperature increases, thermorecpetors in the skin detect that increase in the temperature and send an impulse to the thermoregulatory centre in the hypothalamus so the hypothalamus acts to decrease the body temperature (for you to cool off) and sends impulses via the parasympathetic nervous system to your your diaphram and external intercostal muscles causing them to relax, thus reducing the breathing rate.

But I'm not sure. Good luck to you too! When we carry out investigations for seedlings, do you know if we should carry them out in solutions or in soil ?
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#6
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#6
OH YES YOURE RIGHT. I completely forgot the whole thermoregulatory system from U5.
To answer your question...yes always unless they specifically mention something like "carry out in solution" which I haven't come across so far. Its advantageous to do in soil. If the experiment is about soil mineral content you can write it as one of the limitations or control variables (the mineral content already present in the soil). Tell me how well you do on the test .
(Original post by Leah.J)
Someone told me this : When the environmental temperature increases, thermorecpetors in the skin detect that increase in the temperature and send an impulse to the thermoregulatory centre in the hypothalamus so the hypothalamus acts to decrease the body temperature (for you to cool off) and sends impulses via the parasympathetic nervous system to your your diaphram and external intercostal muscles causing them to relax, thus reducing the breathing rate.

But I'm not sure. Good luck to you too! When we carry out investigations for seedlings, do you know if we should carry them out in solutions or in soil ?
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