Forensic Investigation Watch

ralva_29
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Hi, I am planning on doing the Forensic Investigation course after my A-Levels. Can anybody who is doing or has done this course offer me an insight into what happens during this course and their experiences from doing this course. Thanks.
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LuigiMario
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Not quite sure which course you meant by "forensic investigation", a quick search led me to Canterbury Christ Church University https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-h...ion-19-20.aspx

there are other universities offering similar courses, however this course has interesting facilities
The forensic facilities include a range of crime scenes, including cars, crime scene rooms, fire scenes and outside scenes and a forensic workshop and range of science laboratories. A wide range of forensic equipment is housed within these areas and the facilities and equipment used depends on whether you study Forensic Investigation as a single or combined honours degree.

lets have a bit of a look in more detail (from the link above)

it covers

A) police investigation
B) cybercrime
C) forensic intelligence and research
D) the criminal justice system.

translating that to traditional degrees, you'll see why soon

A) is basically sociology/criminology
B) is basically applied computer science
C) is a bit undefined in my opinion, probably mostly chemistry
d) is again sociology/criminology

from my point of view in a research environment, this course would certainly be very interesting, but is unlikely to give much future employment directly in forensic research...this is because most post degree candidates for Forensic Science would have studied a more original, in depth, traditional course, such as BSc chemistry, this is where forensic recruitment will look first, ideally also with criminology and other specific knowledge

It is similar to how recruitment to , say , a BBC Radio Station tends not to be from Media Studies students, but BA English students.

Due to the "hit TV show" CSI/Las Vegas/Miami/New York and the UK's Silent Witness, Forensic Science has never had a higher profile, whilst sadly not actually existing in England & Wales due to the abolition of the Forensic Science Service in 2012

quoting headlines from very recent news articles,

Financial Times 30 April 2019 - The forensic science system in England and Wales is in a crisis ... Funding cuts including the abolition of the government's Forensic Science Service... forensic work ... suffering as a result of austerity-related spending cuts
Police forensic science at 'breaking point', warn peers...UK was once a world leader in forensic science...

ITV news website 1st May 2019 Forensic science 'inadequate' in England and Wales as House of Lords report warns it has reached breaking point
Services that are pivotal to the criminal justice system are “in trouble”, according to the House of Lords Science and Technology Committee.
Peers suggested a number of factors had contributed to the problems, including an absence of high-level leadership and a lack of funding.

The “quality and delivery” of forensic science in England and Wales is “inadequate”, the report said.
It argued that unless failings are recognised and changes made, public trust will continue to be lost, adding: “Crimes may go unsolved and the number of miscarriages of justice may increase.

“Forensic science in England and Wales is in trouble. "To ensure the delivery of justice, the time for action is now.”
The [House of Lords] committee’s chairman, Lord Patel, warned that the current situation “cannot continue”.
He said: “Our forensic science provision has now reached breaking point and a complete overhaul is needed.



That's just background, it is currently messy, and there IS a need for trained Forensic experts, but the best route would be, in my opinion, take a classic degree in Chemistry (if you like science) , or take a degree in Computer Cybersecurity (if you like computers) or take a degree in Sociology/Criminology if you'd like to eventually be the BOSS of whatever future Forensic Science Service the UK finally adopts. In any of these degrees there will be specific "forensic" = "analytical" modules that you can take, to push your degree course in the direction that you yourself prefer.

Sorry for such a long answer, but you asked a great question - it IS possible, but there might be different ways to do it better than a "Forensic" degree,
such as these Criminology or Chemistry with Forensic courses

Durham Criminology BA
Liverpool Criminology BA
Dundee Forensic Anthropology BSc
Hull Chemistry & Forensic BSc (Hull also do Criminology & Forensic BA)
check-out also UCLAN, Keele, Surrey, Lincoln, Strathclyde, not forgetting Oxford & Cambridge


(Oh, and in Scotland, they thankfully still have their SPA http://www.spa.police.uk/forensic-services/)
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PhoenixFortune
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Moved to Biological and Life Sciences forum, as there isn't a specific forum for this particular subject.
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LTEcactus
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(Original post by LuigiMario)
Not quite sure which course you meant by "forensic investigation", a quick search led me to Canterbury Christ Church University https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-h...ion-19-20.aspx

there are other universities offering similar courses, however this course has interesting facilities
The forensic facilities include a range of crime scenes, including cars, crime scene rooms, fire scenes and outside scenes and a forensic workshop and range of science laboratories. A wide range of forensic equipment is housed within these areas and the facilities and equipment used depends on whether you study Forensic Investigation as a single or combined honours degree.

lets have a bit of a look in more detail (from the link above)

it covers

A) police investigation
B) cybercrime
C) forensic intelligence and research
D) the criminal justice system.

translating that to traditional degrees, you'll see why soon

A) is basically sociology/criminology
B) is basically applied computer science
C) is a bit undefined in my opinion, probably mostly chemistry
d) is again sociology/criminology

from my point of view in a research environment, this course would certainly be very interesting, but is unlikely to give much future employment directly in forensic research...this is because most post degree candidates for Forensic Science would have studied a more original, in depth, traditional course, such as BSc chemistry, this is where forensic recruitment will look first, ideally also with criminology and other specific knowledge

It is similar to how recruitment to , say , a BBC Radio Station tends not to be from Media Studies students, but BA English students.

Due to the "hit TV show" CSI/Las Vegas/Miami/New York and the UK's Silent Witness, Forensic Science has never had a higher profile, whilst sadly not actually existing in England & Wales due to the abolition of the Forensic Science Service in 2012

quoting headlines from very recent news articles,

Financial Times 30 April 2019 - The forensic science system in England and Wales is in a crisis ... Funding cuts including the abolition of the government's Forensic Science Service... forensic work ... suffering as a result of austerity-related spending cuts
Police forensic science at 'breaking point', warn peers...UK was once a world leader in forensic science...

ITV news website 1st May 2019 Forensic science 'inadequate' in England and Wales as House of Lords report warns it has reached breaking point
Services that are pivotal to the criminal justice system are “in trouble”, according to the House of Lords Science and Technology Committee.
Peers suggested a number of factors had contributed to the problems, including an absence of high-level leadership and a lack of funding.

The “quality and delivery” of forensic science in England and Wales is “inadequate”, the report said.
It argued that unless failings are recognised and changes made, public trust will continue to be lost, adding: “Crimes may go unsolved and the number of miscarriages of justice may increase.

“Forensic science in England and Wales is in trouble. "To ensure the delivery of justice, the time for action is now.”
The [House of Lords] committee’s chairman, Lord Patel, warned that the current situation “cannot continue”.
He said: “Our forensic science provision has now reached breaking point and a complete overhaul is needed.



That's just background, it is currently messy, and there IS a need for trained Forensic experts, but the best route would be, in my opinion, take a classic degree in Chemistry (if you like science) , or take a degree in Computer Cybersecurity (if you like computers) or take a degree in Sociology/Criminology if you'd like to eventually be the BOSS of whatever future Forensic Science Service the UK finally adopts. In any of these degrees there will be specific "forensic" = "analytical" modules that you can take, to push your degree course in the direction that you yourself prefer.

Sorry for such a long answer, but you asked a great question - it IS possible, but there might be different ways to do it better than a "Forensic" degree,
such as these Criminology or Chemistry with Forensic courses

Durham Criminology BA
Liverpool Criminology BA
Dundee Forensic Anthropology BSc
Hull Chemistry & Forensic BSc (Hull also do Criminology & Forensic BA)
check-out also UCLAN, Keele, Surrey, Lincoln, Strathclyde, not forgetting Oxford & Cambridge


(Oh, and in Scotland, they thankfully still have their SPA http://www.spa.police.uk/forensic-services/)
That's not quite right, I study Forensic Science BSc, and the course is chartered by the Royal Society of Forensic Science.
I do know that when people have graduated, some people have gone to work for Forensic Science providers.
But I'd go with a course, that's more focused on the science side of things rather than the criminology side of things.
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ralva_29
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I actually am planning on doing the Forensic Investigation Course at Bournemouth University. It is recognised by the Royal Society of Forensic Science.
(Original post by LuigiMario)
Not quite sure which course you meant by "forensic investigation", a quick search led me to Canterbury Christ Church University https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-h...ion-19-20.aspx

there are other universities offering similar courses, however this course has interesting facilities
The forensic facilities include a range of crime scenes, including cars, crime scene rooms, fire scenes and outside scenes and a forensic workshop and range of science laboratories. A wide range of forensic equipment is housed within these areas and the facilities and equipment used depends on whether you study Forensic Investigation as a single or combined honours degree.

lets have a bit of a look in more detail (from the link above)

it covers

A) police investigation
B) cybercrime
C) forensic intelligence and research
D) the criminal justice system.

translating that to traditional degrees, you'll see why soon

A) is basically sociology/criminology
B) is basically applied computer science
C) is a bit undefined in my opinion, probably mostly chemistry
d) is again sociology/criminology

from my point of view in a research environment, this course would certainly be very interesting, but is unlikely to give much future employment directly in forensic research...this is because most post degree candidates for Forensic Science would have studied a more original, in depth, traditional course, such as BSc chemistry, this is where forensic recruitment will look first, ideally also with criminology and other specific knowledge

It is similar to how recruitment to , say , a BBC Radio Station tends not to be from Media Studies students, but BA English students.

Due to the "hit TV show" CSI/Las Vegas/Miami/New York and the UK's Silent Witness, Forensic Science has never had a higher profile, whilst sadly not actually existing in England & Wales due to the abolition of the Forensic Science Service in 2012

quoting headlines from very recent news articles,

Financial Times 30 April 2019 - The forensic science system in England and Wales is in a crisis ... Funding cuts including the abolition of the government's Forensic Science Service... forensic work ... suffering as a result of austerity-related spending cuts
Police forensic science at 'breaking point', warn peers...UK was once a world leader in forensic science...

ITV news website 1st May 2019 Forensic science 'inadequate' in England and Wales as House of Lords report warns it has reached breaking point
Services that are pivotal to the criminal justice system are “in trouble”, according to the House of Lords Science and Technology Committee.
Peers suggested a number of factors had contributed to the problems, including an absence of high-level leadership and a lack of funding.

The “quality and delivery” of forensic science in England and Wales is “inadequate”, the report said.
It argued that unless failings are recognised and changes made, public trust will continue to be lost, adding: “Crimes may go unsolved and the number of miscarriages of justice may increase.

“Forensic science in England and Wales is in trouble. "To ensure the delivery of justice, the time for action is now.”
The [House of Lords] committee’s chairman, Lord Patel, warned that the current situation “cannot continue”.
He said: “Our forensic science provision has now reached breaking point and a complete overhaul is needed.



That's just background, it is currently messy, and there IS a need for trained Forensic experts, but the best route would be, in my opinion, take a classic degree in Chemistry (if you like science) , or take a degree in Computer Cybersecurity (if you like computers) or take a degree in Sociology/Criminology if you'd like to eventually be the BOSS of whatever future Forensic Science Service the UK finally adopts. In any of these degrees there will be specific "forensic" = "analytical" modules that you can take, to push your degree course in the direction that you yourself prefer.

Sorry for such a long answer, but you asked a great question - it IS possible, but there might be different ways to do it better than a "Forensic" degree,
such as these Criminology or Chemistry with Forensic courses

Durham Criminology BA
Liverpool Criminology BA
Dundee Forensic Anthropology BSc
Hull Chemistry & Forensic BSc (Hull also do Criminology & Forensic BA)
check-out also UCLAN, Keele, Surrey, Lincoln, Strathclyde, not forgetting Oxford & Cambridge


(Oh, and in Scotland, they thankfully still have their SPA http://www.spa.police.uk/forensic-services/)
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ralva_29
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Hi since you said u do forensic science I wanted to ask how its like and what they usually teach you on. Also what do u plan on doing after u graduate, and like what job opportunities are there after doing this course?
(Original post by LTEcactus)
That's not quite right, I study Forensic Science BSc, and the course is chartered by the Royal Society of Forensic Science.
I do know that when people have graduated, some people have gone to work for Forensic Science providers.
But I'd go with a course, that's more focused on the science side of things rather than the criminology side of things.
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LuigiMario
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great to hear about the Royal Society of Forensic Science, now if only there was the UK Forensic Service still running!

It looks like the House of Lords (and the potential enormity of damaging legal cases where 'cowboy' paid-for-forensics can overturn convictions) might lead to the return of our national lab, and return credibility to the system..

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/...manchester-lab
https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-42067094. (>10,000 cases to be re-evaluated)


I looked at Bournemouth, https://www.bournemouth.ac.uk/study/...-investigation, does look an interesting course and it's great that the first year is combined Forensic Science & Forensic Investigation - such that you can follow whichever stream you prefer for the course.

I would strongly suggest the optional industrial placement in UK or abroad

I also checked the Chartered Soc. of Forensic Science and their list of accredited colleges here international accredited universities
(they were previously known as http://www.forensic-science-society.org.uk/ )
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LTEcactus
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But what place is it on the league table?
There are better courses out there.
(Original post by ralva_29)
I actually am planning on doing the Forensic Investigation Course at Bournemouth University. It is recognised by the Royal Society of Forensic Science.
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LTEcactus
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It's interesting, but probably not what you expect, there's a lot of Chemistry and Biology, but because if that there's job opportunities in other fields, such as food testing etc
(Original post by ralva_29)
Hi since you said u do forensic science I wanted to ask how its like and what they usually teach you on. Also what do u plan on doing after u graduate, and like what job opportunities are there after doing this course?
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ralva_29
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Thanks for the info.
(Original post by LuigiMario)
great to hear about the Royal Society of Forensic Science, now if only there was the UK Forensic Service still running!

It looks like the House of Lords (and the potential enormity of damaging legal cases where 'cowboy' paid-for-forensics can overturn convictions) might lead to the return of our national lab, and return credibility to the system..

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/...manchester-lab
https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-42067094. (>10,000 cases to be re-evaluated)


I looked at Bournemouth, https://www.bournemouth.ac.uk/study/...-investigation, does look an interesting course and it's great that the first year is combined Forensic Science & Forensic Investigation - such that you can follow whichever stream you prefer for the course.

I would strongly suggest the optional industrial placement in UK or abroad

I also checked the Chartered Soc. of Forensic Science and their list of accredited colleges here international accredited universities
(they were previously known as http://www.forensic-science-society.org.uk/ )
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BU Students
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Hi, it's great to hear you're interesting in studying this course with us here at BU :-)

Do you have any questions about the course, the uni or the town?

In terms of what you can expect from the course, have you looked at the individual units? These can be found on the course page.

I have found a vlog from one of our lovely first years, Jess. You can hear all about her experience on the course, as well as take a peek at some of the activities the students take part in!

I hope this helps.

Many Thanks

Vicki
(Original post by ralva_29)
I actually am planning on doing the Forensic Investigation Course at Bournemouth University. It is recognised by the Royal Society of Forensic Science.
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ralva_29
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Thank you
(Original post by BU Students)
Hi, it's great to hear you're interesting in studying this course with us here at BU :-)

Do you have any questions about the course, the uni or the town?

In terms of what you can expect from the course, have you looked at the individual units? These can be found on the course page.

I have found a vlog from one of our lovely first years, Jess. You can hear all about her experience on the course, as well as take a peek at some of the activities the students take part in!

I hope this helps.

Many Thanks

Vicki
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