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Oxford medicine with these GCSEs?

How low are my chances of getting into Oxford Medicine with these GSCEs:

567788889999 L2D

Worried about the 5 & 6 in Russian & statistics.

Eligible for the contextual offer.
(edited 2 years ago)

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I’d say your GCSEs look good but Oxford medicine is one of the most competitive courses in the country full stop and it’s exceptionally difficult to get in regardless of your grades
Reply 2
I, technically, achieved the ‘highest grades’ in my year group. The secondary school itself makes me eligible for contextual offers as it’s really poor performing. Does that change anything?
Reply 3
I’m considering Oxford as one of my options because I just love the course with its focus on research.

I’ve just heard they put a lot of weight on their GCSEs and I’m not sure how mine compare.
Original post by Unawaree
How low are my chances of getting into Oxford Medicine with these GSCEs:

567788889999 L2D

Worried about the 5 & 6 in Russian & statistics.

Eligible for the contextual offer.

The average gcse number of 8/9s for a successful Oxford medical student is 10.8
So, no.

If you want Oxbridge medicine, better to apply to Cambridge.
Original post by Flibbler
I’d say your GCSEs look good but Oxford medicine is one of the most competitive courses in the country full stop and it’s exceptionally difficult to get in regardless of your grades

This is true as well. Grades are just the starting point
Original post by Unawaree
How low are my chances of getting into Oxford Medicine with these GSCEs:

567788889999 L2D

Worried about the 5 & 6 in Russian & statistics.

Eligible for the contextual offer.


The offer at Cambridge University for Medicine is A*A*A in Chemistry and two of Biology, Maths and Physics. However, most applicants take 4 A-Levels. :smile: https://www.undergraduate.study.cam.ac.uk/files/publications/medicine_subject_requirements.pdf

Also Cambridge has slightly more places per year for Medicine than Oxford too.

But here is the key selection criteria for Cambridge Medicine Admissions:
https://www.undergraduate.study.cam.ac.uk/files/publications/key_criteria_for_medical_admissions.pdf

What A-Levels are you taking? Because you really need Chemistry, Biology and Maths and perhaps an AS-Level in Physics or Psychology.
Reply 7
Original post by thegeek888
The offer at Cambridge University for Medicine is A*A*A in Chemistry and two of Biology, Maths and Physics. However, most applicants take 4 A-Levels. :smile: https://www.undergraduate.study.cam.ac.uk/files/publications/medicine_subject_requirements.pdf

Also Cambridge has slightly more places per year for Medicine than Oxford too.

But here is the key selection criteria for Cambridge Medicine Admissions:
https://www.undergraduate.study.cam.ac.uk/files/publications/key_criteria_for_medical_admissions.pdf

What A-Levels are you taking? Because you really need Chemistry, Biology and Maths and perhaps an AS-Level in Physics or Psychology.

The problem is that I take chemistry, biology, psychology and history…
Original post by Unawaree
The problem is that I take chemistry, biology, psychology and history…

Then don't study medicine at Oxford or Cambridge. There are plenty of medical schools to choose from and all medical schools will train you to the standard required by the GMC.
Original post by Unawaree
The problem is that I take chemistry, biology, psychology and history…

You will need to look up which medical schools only require chemistry and biology, then.

Hardly any of them ask for 4 a levels. Oxford will accept three but then there are your gcse results
Original post by Unawaree
The problem is that I take chemistry, biology, psychology and history…

Cambridge says:


A Levels in Chemistry and one of Biology, Physics, Mathematics.

Most applicants have at least three science/mathematics A Levels and some Colleges require this and/or particular subjects. See College websites for details.

Please note that in the past three admissions rounds, 95% of applicants for Medicine (A100) offered three or more science/mathematics A Levels and, of these, 23% were successful in obtaining a place. Of the 4% of applicants who offered only two science/mathematics A Levels, just 3% were successful in gaining a place.



But you have 3 other choices, honestly, the uni doesn't matter because the medicine course has to be consistent - you wouldn't want a different level of service in different places around the country. Focus on medicine not Oxbridge medicine
(edited 2 years ago)
Original post by Unawaree
The problem is that I take chemistry, biology, psychology and history…

The best thing to do is to email the colleges you like the look of residing and socialising at Cambridge University. :biggrin:

Then explain to them your subjects and ask them if they would accept Maths or either History. :wink:

https://www.undergraduate.study.cam.ac.uk/colleges

You could always drop History and self-teach Maths on the Pearson Edexcel exam board.

History is not easy to get a an A* or A grade in as a subject at A-Level compared to GCSE but Maths is only 50% half marks for an A and 70% for an A *.

It only takes 3 months or maybe 6 months. Because there are so many YouTube videos online and Googling also has even more resources.

Also the topics in A-Level Maths have not changed much at all since the 1990s. But some have been removed and put into Further Maths.

Topic 1 Proof
Topic 2 Algebra and functions
Topic 3 Coordinate geometry in the (x, y) plane
Topic 4 Sequences and series
Topic 5 Trigonometry
Topic 6 Exponentials and logarithms
Topic 7 Differentiation
Topic 8 Integration
Topic 9 Numerical methods
Topic 10 Vectors

Paper 1 and Paper 2 may contain questions on any topics from the Pure Mathematics content.

Section A: Statistics
Topic 1 Statistical sampling
Topic 2 Data presentation and interpretation
Topic 3 Probability
Topic 4 Statistical distributions
Topic 5 Statistical hypothesis testing

Section B: Mechanics
Topic 6 Quantities and units in mechanics
Topic 7 Kinematics
Topic 8 Forces and Newton’s laws
Topic 9 Moments

It really is not difficult. You can ask me questions and I can email you all the past papers in a zip file from 2001 to 2019 for Edexcel, OCR, OCR MEI, AQA, CCEA, CIE, WJEC and SQA. :wink:

Good luck.
Original post by thegeek888
The best thing to do is to email the colleges you like the look of residing and socialising at Cambridge University. :biggrin:

Then explain to them your subjects and ask them if they would accept Maths or either History. :wink:

https://www.undergraduate.study.cam.ac.uk/colleges

You could always drop History and self-teach Maths on the Pearson Edexcel exam board.

History is not easy to get a an A* or A grade in as a subject at A-Level compared to GCSE but Maths is only 50% half marks for an A and 70% for an A *.

It only takes 3 months or maybe 6 months. Because there are so many YouTube videos online and Googling also has even more resources.

Also the topics in A-Level Maths have not changed much at all since the 1990s. But some have been removed and put into Further Maths.

Topic 1 Proof
Topic 2 Algebra and functions
Topic 3 Coordinate geometry in the (x, y) plane
Topic 4 Sequences and series
Topic 5 Trigonometry
Topic 6 Exponentials and logarithms
Topic 7 Differentiation
Topic 8 Integration
Topic 9 Numerical methods
Topic 10 Vectors

Paper 1 and Paper 2 may contain questions on any topics from the Pure Mathematics content.

Section A: Statistics
Topic 1 Statistical sampling
Topic 2 Data presentation and interpretation
Topic 3 Probability
Topic 4 Statistical distributions
Topic 5 Statistical hypothesis testing

Section B: Mechanics
Topic 6 Quantities and units in mechanics
Topic 7 Kinematics
Topic 8 Forces and Newton’s laws
Topic 9 Moments

It really is not difficult. You can ask me questions and I can email you all the past papers in a zip file from 2001 to 2019 for Edexcel, OCR, OCR MEI, AQA, CCEA, CIE, WJEC and SQA. :wink:

Good luck.

I have to disagree with this, yes A Level maths has low grade boundaries but that's because there are very high mark questions which you have to know what to do before you even attempt it, if you don't know where to start, you lose 10, 12 marks straight away. You can't compare the subjects as one is essay-based and the other is not. Maths definitely is a lot more useful to bio and chem but it is not easy.

Also, you can't share emails.
Original post by chris01928
Cambridge says:


A Levels in Chemistry and one of Biology, Physics, Mathematics.

Most applicants have at least three science/mathematics A Levels and some Colleges require this and/or particular subjects. See College websites for details.

Please note that in the past three admissions rounds, 95% of applicants for Medicine (A100) offered three or more science/mathematics A Levels and, of these, 23% were successful in obtaining a place. Of the 4% of applicants who offered only two science/mathematics A Levels, just 3% were successful in gaining a place.



But you have 3 other choices, honestly, the uni doesn't matter because the medicine course has to be consistent - you wouldn't want a different level of service in different places around the country. Focus on medicine not Oxbridge medicine

Exactly
Original post by chris01928
I have to disagree with this, yes A Level maths has low grade boundaries but that's because there are very high mark questions which you have to know what to do before you even attempt it, if you don't know where to start, you lose 10, 12 marks straight away. You can't compare the subjects as one is essay-based and the other is not. Maths definitely is a lot more useful to bio and chem but it is not easy.

Also, you can't share emails.

Yes, I agree totally Chris, Maths A-Level is not easy, but 50% achieved an A*, A or B grade in November 2021 nationally. This is only possible by practicing questions and understanding the concepts. Where as in History, it is all about the essays and topics you get given in the exam. Some candidates could gain advantage by having a strong awareness of the essay topics but some less knowledgeable and underprepared could lose out and get a E or U grade in History A-Level. I personally found the sample lessons of A-Level History a nightmare as there were less resources for the course in revision guides and revision courses as well as a completely different format of exams and essays.

All in all, the OP should self study Maths, as it will be advantageous for the Cambridge UCAS application. Also considering the workload at Cambridge University is 3 A-Levels or so in a term. :wink:
Original post by thegeek888
Yes, I agree totally Chris, Maths A-Level is not easy, but 50% achieved an A*, A or B grade in November 2021 nationally. This is only possible by practicing questions and understanding the concepts. Where as in History, it is all about the essays and topics you get given in the exam. Some candidates could gain advantage by having a strong awareness of the essay topics but some less knowledgeable and underprepared could lose out and get a E or U grade in History A-Level. I personally found the sample lessons of A-Level History a nightmare as there were less resources for the course in revision guides and revision courses as well as a completely different format of exams and essays.

All in all, the OP should self study Maths, as it will be advantageous for the Cambridge UCAS application. Also considering the workload at Cambridge University is 3 A-Levels or so in a term. :wink:

And my son said that in Oxford medicine they learn the equivalent of an a level in knowledge every 6 weeks
Original post by chris01928
Cambridge says:


A Levels in Chemistry and one of Biology, Physics, Mathematics.

Most applicants have at least three science/mathematics A Levels and some Colleges require this and/or particular subjects. See College websites for details.

Please note that in the past three admissions rounds, 95% of applicants for Medicine (A100) offered three or more science/mathematics A Levels and, of these, 23% were successful in obtaining a place. Of the 4% of applicants who offered only two science/mathematics A Levels, just 3% were successful in gaining a place.



But you have 3 other choices, honestly, the uni doesn't matter because the medicine course has to be consistent - you wouldn't want a different level of service in different places around the country. Focus on medicine not Oxbridge medicine


It has been made clear by Cambridge then:

95% of applicants for Medicine (A100) offered three or more science/mathematics A Levels and, of these, 23% were successful in obtaining a place.

Of the 4% of applicants who offered only two science/mathematics A Levels, just 3% were successful in gaining a place.

So the OP should really self teach Maths A-Level and drop History. Perhaps, her A-Levels are more suited to a Law degree! :biggrin:
Original post by thegeek888
Yes, I agree totally Chris, Maths A-Level is not easy, but 50% achieved an A*, A or B grade in November 2021 nationally. This is only possible by practicing questions and understanding the concepts.

*cough cough* grade inflation - look at the years before
Original post by thegeek888
Where as in History, it is all about the essays and topics you get given in the exam. Some candidates could gain advantage by having a strong awareness of the essay topics but some less knowledgeable and underprepared could lose out and get a E or U grade in History A-Level. I personally found the sample lessons of A-Level History a nightmare as there were less resources for the course in revision guides and revision courses as well as a completely different format of exams and essays.

I'd argue that all A Level subjects would require you to be knowledgable and prepared, as you say A* in maths requires 'practicing questions and understanding the concepts.'

Side note: I like History and find it fascinating but would hate studying it. Hated it at GCSE and we learnt about medicine at GCSE
Original post by thegeek888

All in all, the OP should self study Maths, as it will be advantageous for the Cambridge UCAS application. Also considering the workload at Cambridge University is 3 A-Levels or so in a term. :wink:

Agreed but I think it would be useful for the other subjects too - makes physical chem a breeze and stats in bio simple.

Don't understand what your last point means - 'Also considering the workload at Cambridge University is 3 A-Levels or so in a term. :wink:'
Original post by chris01928
'Also considering the workload at Cambridge University is 3 A-Levels or so in a term. :wink:'

How long is a term again?
Original post by Oxford Mum
And my son said that in Oxford medicine they learn the equivalent of an a level in knowledge every 6 weeks

It's not surprising that Oxford has a A-Level workload for every 6 weeks. But in Sciences at Cambridge it is a fully packed timetable Monday morning to Saturday afternoon. No wonder the Cambridge graduates earn the highest salaries! :wink: lol

But however much I'd like to apply to Oxford Law, I would not get far due to GCSEs and my UMS scores for Maths and Further Maths will make my Cambridge application look better.

Cambridge also has Saturday morning lectures for Science subject but not Arts. But nevertheless Cambridge Law applicants can see they will have 2 lectures of 2 hours a week on 5 papers.

Oxford doesn't do as many papers as Cambridge, as they only have 8 or 9 in Finals and 2 or 3 in first year pre mod lims.