The Student Room Group

Is ChatGPT a Friend or foe?

People will always find ways to take shortcuts around hard work
re write The arrival of OpenAI’s ChatGPT ... may signal the end of writing assignments altogether and maybe even the end of writing as a gatekeeper, a metric for intelligence, a teachable skill
The bottom line: Students who use ChatGPT to slack off do so at their own peril but there's educational potential here too
Reply 1
My biggest concern with this is that it will potentially further push standardized tests, which are not for everyone. where a well composed essay gives the student the ability to show critical thinking, a standardized test, just shows who has the best memory.
No idea tbh
Reply 3
The algorithm for ChatGPT is beautifully simplistic. As we speak people are working on algorithms to detect it's use. It won't be long before the likes to Turnitin catch up.
Original post by TheEddie24ful
People will always find ways to take shortcuts around hard work
re write The arrival of OpenAI’s ChatGPT ... may signal the end of writing assignments altogether and maybe even the end of writing as a gatekeeper, a metric for intelligence, a teachable skill
The bottom line: Students who use ChatGPT to slack off do so at their own peril but there's educational potential here too

I was rooting for Ultron in the marvel films... so, to me it's a good thing.

lol
Original post by hotpud
The algorithm for ChatGPT is beautifully simplistic. As we speak people are working on algorithms to detect it's use. It won't be long before the likes to Turnitin catch up.


The enterprising student won't just copy/paste ChatGPT's output though. I was genuinely impressed at how well ChatGPT was able to write essays on semi-obscure molecular biology topics. If I was still at university, I'd be using it to cut out a lot of the initial research.
Reply 6
Original post by Crazed cat lady
The enterprising student won't just copy/paste ChatGPT's output though. I was genuinely impressed at how well ChatGPT was able to write essays on semi-obscure molecular biology topics. If I was still at university, I'd be using it to cut out a lot of the initial research.


As an educator I would ask why? What is the point? If you do that, you are simply wasting your time and the time of the lecturer who has to mark it. You don't do essays and assignments for the lecturer. You do it for you. You do it to learn. And by cheating, the only person who loses out is you. Sure, you get a piece of paper with a degree written on it, but there will be a point at which you get called out and are left wanting.

I would say to students thinking of using ChatGPT for the purposes of cheating to not bother with university and do something else instead.
Reply 7
Original post by hotpud
As an educator I would ask why? What is the point? If you do that, you are simply wasting your time and the time of the lecturer who has to mark it. You don't do essays and assignments for the lecturer. You do it for you. You do it to learn. And by cheating, the only person who loses out is you. Sure, you get a piece of paper with a degree written on it, but there will be a point at which you get called out and are left wanting.

I would say to students thinking of using ChatGPT for the purposes of cheating to not bother with university and do something else instead.

Part of the problem is that a lot of students see their education in solely instrumental terms, which means that they aren't as invested as some others in the nuts and bolts of doing things to improve, education as a gradual, cumulative experience, loving the subject. I think this move towards instrumentality has been a driver towards cheating. I see it a lot in my department.
Reply 8
Original post by gjd800
Part of the problem is that a lot of students see their education in solely instrumental terms, which means that they aren't as invested as some others in the nuts and bolts of doing things to improve, education as a gradual, cumulative experience, loving the subject. I think this move towards instrumentality has been a driver towards cheating. I see it a lot in my department.


But equally, given that students are coming out of a school based education system where they have little or no agency over their learning has anyone at university level ever thought to actually explain to their students that their learning and degree is about them, not the university? I do it with my A-level students and they get it!
Reply 9
Original post by hotpud
But equally, given that students are coming out of a school based education system where they have little or no agency over their learning has anyone at university level ever thought to actually explain to their students that their learning and degree is about them, not the university? I do it with my A-level students and they get it!

Well, yes. routinely. But many don't care - especially if it's finance or econ related. They want a bit of paper to let them make lots of money in a bank. I have around 200 students under my advising purview, I think about 10-20% of them take their discipline seriously in the same way my philosophy cohort did when I was reading for my undergraduate degree.. The vast, vast majority come in to complain about the degree and lament that they're just doing it to get a great gig at a bank. With that attitude, I am not surprised to see so much cheating.

In my experience, much of it is discipline dependent. I don't think you see as much of the instrumentality mindset in the humanities, for what are probably obvious reasons.
Reply 10
Original post by gjd800
Well, yes. routinely. But many don't care - especially if it's finance or econ related. They want a bit of paper to let them make lots of money in a bank. I have around 200 students under my advising purview, I think about 10-20% of them take their discipline seriously in the same way my philosophy cohort did when I was reading for my undergraduate degree.. The vast, vast majority come in to complain about the degree and lament that they're just doing it to get a great gig at a bank. With that attitude, I am not surprised to see so much cheating.

In my experience, much of it is discipline dependent. I don't think you see as much of the instrumentality mindset in the humanities, for what are probably obvious reasons.

In fairness to them its not like they have a choice in getting a degree - few do if you dont want to do manual labour or the like. A degree being as required as your gcse's. With that in mind, its hard to fault them for treating it like high schoolers, especially when they (nominally at least) have to pay for it
Original post by Napp
In fairness to them its not like they have a choice in getting a degree - few do if you dont want to do manual labour or the like. A degree being as required as your gcse's. With that in mind, its hard to fault them for treating it like high schoolers, especially when they (nominally at least) have to pay for it

Well, I didn't say that I did. And my posts elsewhere on this site routinely bemoan that other options are not as 'available' to young people. But it does nevertheless feed into a couldn't-care-less-attitude that many keep until they are caught cheating (and some keep it even after :lol: ).

I'm not sure the 'I'll do econ or finance to get a cushy bank gig' crowd would choose another option even if it were available, to be frank. So, yes, part of the problem. But not all of it.
See the AI of chatGPT critical. If ChatGPT is able to write an essay about any subjects with a clear sturcture, and clear thoughts that students don't need to waste a thought for themselves about a subject, I see a big issue for people to use their brain in the future, becsuse it loses the importance more and more.
(edited 11 months ago)
According to me, ChatGPT is good If we are just taking help so it is right but if we are copy-pasting then it is wrong.
Reply 14
Original post by TheEddie24ful
People will always find ways to take shortcuts around hard work
re write The arrival of OpenAI’s ChatGPT ... may signal the end of writing assignments altogether and maybe even the end of writing as a gatekeeper, a metric for intelligence, a teachable skill
The bottom line: Students who use ChatGPT to slack off do so at their own peril but there's educational potential here too


This presents a rather pessimistic and narrow perspective on the impact of ChatGPT. While it acknowledges the potential for students to use it as a tool to avoid hard work, it fails to consider the broader implications and possibilities that this technology brings.

To dismiss writing assignments and writing itself as gatekeepers of intelligence and teachable skills is shortsighted. Writing is a fundamental means of communication, critical thinking, and self-expression. It allows individuals to articulate their thoughts, analyze complex ideas, and develop coherent arguments. Removing the emphasis on writing assignments would undermine the development of these essential skills.

Furthermore, blaming ChatGPT for the supposed end of writing assignments overlooks the role of educators in adapting their teaching methodologies. Instead of perceiving ChatGPT as a threat, it should be seen as a valuable tool that can augment the learning experience. Educators can guide students in leveraging ChatGPT to enhance their writing skills, encouraging critical thinking and creativity while also fostering digital literacy.

Moreover, by focusing solely on the potential negative consequences, the comment neglects the educational opportunities presented by ChatGPT. This technology can be utilized to assist students in overcoming language barriers, providing personalized feedback, and expanding access to educational resources. It has the potential to enhance the learning experience, foster innovation, and empower students to explore new avenues of expression.

This post fails to recognize the multifaceted impact of OpenAI's ChatGPT. Rather than solely highlighting the risks, it is essential to embrace a balanced perspective that acknowledges both the challenges and the educational potential this technology brings.

[You guessed it... written by ChatGPT. So boring.]

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