The Student Room Group

Being a year behind

I'm a year behind in academics as I joined school late. I feel very insecure as all my classmates are 1 year younger and they also kinda like to brag about it whenever the topic of age comes up and it makes me feel less successful event hough I try my best at studies, I'm just getting anxious about it.

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(edited 9 months ago)
Original post by Bleeep-
I'm a year behind in academics as I joined school late. I feel very insecure as all my classmates are 1 year younger and they also kinda like to brag about it whenever the topic of age comes up and it makes me feel less successful event hough I try my best at studies, I'm just getting anxious about it.

I'm the UK, a child born on 1st September and a child born on 31st August of the next year will be in the same school year - despite them being almost a full year apart in terms of their age.

Similarly, two children born on 31st August and one born on the next day will be a year apart in terms of school years.

So the sort of disparity you're describing is already built into the system. Do these students feel the same sort of insecurity as you, just down to the random nature of their birthday? No, then nor should you.

What month is your birthday? You may be closer in age to your classmates than you think.
You really shouldn't let it get to you.

My eldest son (August born) should be going to college this September but he's decided to hold off for a year and start a year "late".

Really there's no late or early for anything. Everyone's path through life is their own. Who cares if your classmates are younger - chances are some of them will only be a few months younger anyway. Look at universities - some people go at 18, and some people go at 90!

It's honestly not a big deal.
Reply 3
Original post by PinkMobilePhone
You really shouldn't let it get to you.

My eldest son (August born) should be going to college this September but he's decided to hold off for a year and start a year "late".

Really there's no late or early for anything. Everyone's path through life is their own. Who cares if your classmates are younger - chances are some of them will only be a few months younger anyway. Look at universities - some people go at 18, and some people go at 90!

It's honestly not a big deal.

Thanks alot for your advice, I know I should not let such things get to me, but sometimes they do, and it feels the worst but I will try my best and keep on focusing on my journey
Reply 4
Original post by DataVenia
I'm the UK, a child born on 1st September and a child born on 31st August of the next year will be in the same school year - despite them being almost a full year apart in terms of their age.

Similarly, two children born on 31st August and one born on the next day will be a year apart in terms of school years.

So the sort of disparity you're describing is already built into the system. Do these students feel the same sort of insecurity as you, just down to the random nature of their birthday? No, then nor should you.

What month is your birthday? You may be closer in age to your classmates than you think.


It's in July
Original post by Bleeep-
Thanks alot for your advice, I know I should not let such things get to me, but sometimes they do, and it feels the worst but I will try my best and keep on focusing on my journey

You'd still be a year behind, in terms of career, and your peers would have a head start on you. If you're OK with that then you're fine. If not, what would you do about it?

Skipping a year is difficult, although not impossible if you have good planning and support. My support was awful and my planning before I tried it was honestly pretty bad, along with slacking off and playing video games for hours and hours when I tried. Despite that, and other life setbacks, I'm still here and would probably manage it.

If you really wanted to do something about it, you might make it, although I have to warn you, it's tougher than you think.
(edited 10 months ago)
Original post by Bleeep-
It's in July

OK. So you're one of the youngest in your year. The difference between your age and that of the next oldest in the year will be less than the difference between that student's age and the youngest. Does that make sense?

Let's suppose you were born in July 2008 (I'm just guessing - using an actual year helps illustrate the below). Ordinarily, you'd be in Year 10 right now, but you're actually in Year 9. Excluding you, the oldest child in Year 9 was born in September 2008, and the youngest in August 2009 - so those children have birthdays which are 11 months apart. But they're in the same school year, so nobody takes any notice. You were born in July 2008, so you're just 2 months older than the child born in September 2008, who's in the same year as you. So, as I said, this is just a weird artifact of the school year system working against you.

Let me repeat the key point: The difference between your age and the next oldest child in your year is 2 months - and that bothers you. The difference between that child and the youngest child in your year is 11 months - and nobody pays that any attention.
Original post by DataVenia
OK. So you're one of the youngest in your year. The difference between your age and that of the next oldest in the year will be less than the difference between that student's age and the youngest. Does that make sense?

Let's suppose you were born in July 2008 (I'm just guessing - using an actual year helps illustrate the below). Ordinarily, you'd be in Year 10 right now, but you're actually in Year 9. Excluding you, the oldest child in Year 9 was born in September 2008, and the youngest in August 2009 - so those children have birthdays which are 11 months apart. But they're in the same school year, so nobody takes any notice. You were born in July 2008, so you're just 2 months older than the child born in September 2008, who's in the same year as you. So, as I said, this is just a weird artifact of the school year system working against you.

Let me repeat the key point: The difference between your age and the next oldest child in your year is 2 months - and that bothers you. The difference between that child and the youngest child in your year is 11 months - and nobody pays that any attention.


Exactly that

When I was in high school, there was a boy in my tutor group whose birthday was 1st September 1983, and a girl (my mate) whose birthday was 31st August 1984.
The boy was obviously much closer in age to kids born in August 1983 than he was to my mate, but they were in the year above.
Similarly my mate was much closer in age to kids born in September 1984 than she was to the aforementioned boy, but they were in the year below.

The OP is definitely worrying about nothing.
It's like my kids. Of the first three:

One was born September 2005
One was born August 2007
One was born September 2009

So roughly 2 years apart in age, right?

Yet one is in Year 12, one is in Year 11, and one is in Year 8

Ridiculous, but that's just the way the academic years work.
It won't matter in the long run. It might even turn out as an advantage, as you will be more mature, when you enter university or do an apprenticeship or similar. You will have additional life experience and that will most likely benefit you, instead of keeping you back.
There is nothing wrong with this and you just should focus yourself.

A lot of people and those same people may consider a gap/foundation/sandwich year in the future for university which will set them behind in studies compared to other people. The more you get older, you will realise it and not see it as an issue at all.

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