The Student Room Group

Edexcel A-level Further Mathematics Paper 2 (9FM0 02) - 5th June 2023 [Exam Chat]

Poll

How did your Edexcel Further Maths Paper 2 exam go today?



Edexcel A Level Further Mathematics Paper 2 (9FM0 02) - 5th June 2023 [Exam Chat]

Welcome to the exam discussion thread for this exam. Introduce yourself! Let others know what you're aiming for in your exams, what you are struggling with in your revision or anything else.

Wishing you all the best of luck.

General Information
Date/Time: Mon 5 Jun 2023/ PM
Length: 1h 30m

Congratulations on finishing your exam!
(edited 8 months ago)

Scroll to see replies

Reply 1
Welcome to the exam discussion thread for this exam. Introduce yourself! Let others know what you're aiming for in your exams, what you are struggling with in your revision or anything else.

Wishing you all the best of luck.

General Information
Date/Time: Monday 5th June 2023/ PM
Length: 1h 30m
Sorry you've not had any responses about this. :frown: Are you sure you've posted in the right place? :smile: Here's a link to our subject forum which should help get you more responses if you post there. :redface:
Since core 1 can die, what are we doing for core 2?
Reply 4
So the major topics which didn’t come up in this paper were; second order differential equations, polar coordinates, series (method of differences), volumes of revolution and liner transformations which tend to appear in most papers.

Wouldn’t be surprised if some harder complex numbers and hyperbolics came up in paper 2 so this is where I’ll be focusing my revision. I’m not here to make predictions though!!
Reply 5
Original post by Jac0515
So the major topics which didn’t come up in this paper were; second order differential equations, polar coordinates, series (method of differences), volumes of revolution and liner transformations which tend to appear in most papers.

Wouldn’t be surprised if some harder complex numbers and hyperbolics came up in paper 2 so this is where I’ll be focusing my revision. I’m not here to make predictions though!!

I reckon hyperbolic's will come up, they love to add them in, there also wasn't any inverse trig really on paper one.
hoping that second order comes up, it could be a coupled first order though which goes onto a second
(edited 9 months ago)
Reply 6
Original post by Zo3.
I reckon hyperbolic's will come up, they love to add them in, there also wasn't any inverse trig really on paper one.
hoping that second order comes up, it could be a coupled first order though which goes onto a second


yes good points!!
Reply 7
Original post by Zo3.
I reckon hyperbolic's will come up, they love to add them in, there also wasn't any inverse trig really on paper one.
hoping that second order comes up, it could be a coupled first order though which goes onto a second

There was finding the derivative of arctan in the DE question in paper 1, but I do feel like there'll be more inverse trig in CP2. I also feel like there'll be some De Moivre's Theorem, hopefully not sums of series tho.
Original post by jimmelton
There was finding the derivative of arctan in the DE question in paper 1, but I do feel like there'll be more inverse trig in CP2. I also feel like there'll be some De Moivre's Theorem, hopefully not sums of series tho.

The sums of series questions are annoying.

I expect polar coordinates to come up - areas involving tangents kinda like on last year’s CP2 will probably show up. I also really hope we don’t have to sketch any of those goddamn polar curves.
Topics not included on CP1 (Likely to be on CP2):
Volumes of Revolution, Linear Transformations, Yr2 Complex Numbers (i.e. Trig Identites, Sums of Series, Geometric Problems), Methods in Calculus (Improper Integrals and Inverse Trig), Polar Coordinates, Differential Equations (Second Order, Coupled, Harmonic Motion).

Might also be more vectors (angles and perpendicular distances weren't tested), another more difficult proof by induction, hyperbolics worth more marks than in Paper 1. There could be Maclaurin or Method of Differences, but these will be worth fewer marks as the series question on Paper 1 was already very difficult.

I would prioritise the polar coordinates, complex numbers and second order differential equations. I think they have the potential to be awful questions given the state of the first paper, and I'm not sure they'll be able to test everything here as it's only 75 marks. Good luck everyone!
(edited 9 months ago)
Topics not included on CP1 (Likely to be on CP2):
Volumes of Revolution, Linear Transformations, Yr2 Complex Numbers (i.e. Trig Identites, Sums of Series, Geometric Problems), Methods in Calculus (Improper Integrals and Inverse Trig), Polar Coordinates, Differential Equations (Second Order, Coupled, Harmonic Motion).

Might also be more vectors (angles and perpendicular distances weren't tested), another more difficult proof by induction, hyperbolics worth more marks than in Paper 1.

I would prioritise the polar coordinates, complex numbers and second order differential equations. I think they have the potential to be awful questions having done Paper 1, and I'm not sure they'll be able to test everything here as it's only 75 marks. Good luck everyone!
I think 3rd order differential equations will come up
Reply 12
Na, nth order differential equations
Original post by ASCC2014
Na, nth order differential equations


At this point I would not be surprised. They could genuinely give us a 3rd order one and expect us to use our knowledge of 2nd order ones to figure it out. (The method is actually pretty similar too)
Reply 14
Original post by The tesseract
At this point I would not be surprised. They could genuinely give us a 3rd order one and expect us to use our knowledge of 2nd order ones to figure it out. (The method is actually pretty similar too)

I really hope they don't, but it might be worth a quick look at 3rd orders. Isn't there some funky thing you can do to make an equation like f''(x) = af'(x) + bf(x) which scales so would allow you to solve nth order homogenous differential equations? Not sure about non-homogenous ones though.
Original post by ASCC2014
I really hope they don't, but it might be worth a quick look at 3rd orders. Isn't there some funky thing you can do to make an equation like f''(x) = af'(x) + bf(x) which scales so would allow you to solve nth order homogenous differential equations? Not sure about non-homogenous ones though.

No chance in hell. But 3rd order ODE also have auxiliary equations. E.g. if you have f'''(x)+6f''(x)-20f'(x)+30x=0 the general solution would be f(x)=Ae^(-8.7x)+e^(1.35x)(Bsin(1.28x)+Ccos(1.28x)). I have rounded the roots and don't count on this being right, but I think it is
Original post by ASCC2014
I really hope they don't, but it might be worth a quick look at 3rd orders. Isn't there some funky thing you can do to make an equation like f''(x) = af'(x) + bf(x) which scales so would allow you to solve nth order homogenous differential equations? Not sure about non-homogenous ones though.

If sufficient boundary conditions were given for a non-homogeneous third order DE, I’d probably just find an approximate Taylor series solution as far as the third or fourth non zero term tbh.

And if given a homogeneous third order DE, I’d probably attempt to do it from first principles with a substitution like y = e^ax
Reply 17
Original post by The tesseract
No chance in hell. But 3rd order ODE also have auxiliary equations. E.g. if you have f'''(x)+6f''(x)-20f'(x)+30x=0 the general solution would be f(x)=Ae^(-8.7x)+e^(1.35x)(Bsin(1.28x)+Ccos(1.28x)). I have rounded the roots and don't count on this being right, but I think it is

Thanks :smile:
Original post by TypicalNerd
If sufficient boundary conditions were given for a non-homogeneous third order DE, I’d probably just find an approximate Taylor series solution as far as the third or fourth non zero term tbh.

And if given a homogeneous third order DE, I’d probably attempt to do it from first principles with a substitution like y = e^ax


That's a very sensible way of going about it that I hadn't thought of. Might be the sort of thing they'd be expecting if they asked us to do 3rd orders although The tesseract's method is very close to second order so could be what they want.

Any ideas on where to get challenge questions, most of the past paper questions seem easier than the paper 1 we did?
Reply 18
Year 12 student here, why was core 1 really hard?
Reply 19
Original post by mskr710
Year 12 student here, why was core 1 really hard?


The questions were somewhat abnormal for exam papers, teetering on the edge of the syllabus, while the marks seemed to be awarded less generously than normal leading to issues with timings (I usually complete a past paper in 1h 30m but was still writing at the end of my 25% extra time) especially with the sheer amount of algebraic manipulation which seemingly will score 0 marks.
Have a look at the thread for that paper: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=7348958&page=3

Quick Reply

Latest