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Online degree in Psychology with BPS

I have found few online Psychology degrees that would qualify me for BPS registration. My goal is to make it to one the Professional doctorate programmes to eventually qualify as Clinical Psychologists. I am nearly 40, I have some volunteering experience, I do lots of online courses. I am used to it.
Is there any meaningful difference in between them, or any qualifying course will do?

I found few via Arden, UEL, Essex Online, and OU.
Original post by SocksInSandals
I have found few online Psychology degrees that would qualify me for BPS registration. My goal is to make it to one the Professional doctorate programmes to eventually qualify as Clinical Psychologists. I am nearly 40, I have some volunteering experience, I do lots of online courses. I am used to it.
Is there any meaningful difference in between them, or any qualifying course will do?

I found few via Arden, UEL, Essex Online, and OU.

As long as it's BPS accredited and confers GBC then it'll be fine.

Note that if you already have a degree in another field, you might like to do a Psychology Conversion course instead (that'd be a Master's). That would be be a quicker way to get your GBC.
Reply 2
Original post by SocksInSandals
I have found few online Psychology degrees that would qualify me for BPS registration. My goal is to make it to one the Professional doctorate programmes to eventually qualify as Clinical Psychologists. I am nearly 40, I have some volunteering experience, I do lots of online courses. I am used to it.
Is there any meaningful difference in between them, or any qualifying course will do?

I found few via Arden, UEL, Essex Online, and OU.

Hi! I did my Psychology degree with the OU and really enjoyed it. As above, as long as it is accredited by the BPS it doesn't matter which you choose, they will all cover very similar things.
Thank you guys.
The above posters are correct about it not mattering where you get your undergrad from as long as it is BPS recognised. However, before you go down the very expensive, uncertain and lengthy process of trying to get onto a DClinPsy, it may be worth considering the success rate for applicants according to the various age ranges and success rates for over 40s is one of the lowest groups:

https://www.clearing-house.org.uk/system/files/2023-05/Equal%20opportunities%20data%20for%202022%20entry_0.pdf

Psychology undergrad courses don't trumpet this part, as their job is to fill their seats, and they don't have a stake in whether you get onto a DClinPsy or not.

There may be many reasons for that, some of which may or may not apply to you. It's a path that requires flexibility, mobility and lots of time to be competitive in the academic, research and clinical domains courses look for. It's not particularly forgiving if you have dependents, or can't drop to a lower level of income to do the entry level jobs that are valued in terms of experience.

That's not to say don't do it, but do be realistic, aware of the numbers and go into it with your eyes open.
Original post by Lord Asriel
The above posters are correct about it not mattering where you get your undergrad from as long as it is BPS recognised. However, before you go down the very expensive, uncertain and lengthy process of trying to get onto a DClinPsy, it may be worth considering the success rate for applicants according to the various age ranges and success rates for over 40s is one of the lowest groups:

https://www.clearing-house.org.uk/system/files/2023-05/Equal%20opportunities%20data%20for%202022%20entry_0.pdf

Psychology undergrad courses don't trumpet this part, as their job is to fill their seats, and they don't have a stake in whether you get onto a DClinPsy or not.

There may be many reasons for that, some of which may or may not apply to you. It's a path that requires flexibility, mobility and lots of time to be competitive in the academic, research and clinical domains courses look for. It's not particularly forgiving if you have dependents, or can't drop to a lower level of income to do the entry level jobs that are valued in terms of experience.

That's not to say don't do it, but do be realistic, aware of the numbers and go into it with your eyes open.



I am aware of those stats, to be honest it does not look that bad. To get my current job I had to send 1300 applications and went to 80 interviews. Most of remote ML jobs tend to have 1-2k of applicants per place.

I am just afraid that I might be automatically discarded for not going to a "real" university for my BSc.
Original post by SocksInSandals
I have found few online Psychology degrees that would qualify me for BPS registration. My goal is to make it to one the Professional doctorate programmes to eventually qualify as Clinical Psychologists. I am nearly 40, I have some volunteering experience, I do lots of online courses. I am used to it.
Is there any meaningful difference in between them, or any qualifying course will do?

I found few via Arden, UEL, Essex Online, and OU.


@SocksinSandals
Hello! I'm delighted to see you have done your research and found a handful of good providers. I didn't do a BSc I did an MSc conversion to Psychology a few years back and I've worked in Higher Education for over 10 years.

There are a few factors to consider-
* Quality of the University and provision, for an unbiased view check out a Universities report with the QAA ( a bit like an Ofsted Report) and their Teaching Excellence Framework Report both readily available online, for an unbiased review

* That the course is fully accredited by the BPS, if it is you'll pretty much study the same unit's wherever you go

* If you need flexibility in your learning such as studying 100% from home, or can only be on site a few days I would go with a provider that specialises in distance learning such as Arden (where I studied and had a great time) or the Open University. There will be other great providers out there, but some Universities in post Covid world have rushed online versions of courses to expand to European markets without having a great 'virtual learning environment' to support them

Remember you are never too old to study, I went back to Uni at 34 and have a great time! best of luck!

Marc
Arden University Student Ambassador

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