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Career in psychotherapy

Good day.

I was an international student in London.
I graduated in Bsc ( Economics, Finance and Management ).

I want to change my path, and be a practising psychotherapist in the UK.

1) What further courses for study should I take up in the UK, in order to do so. ( I am aware of conversion courses for psychology existing in some universities also.).

2) I'd like to start study in 2024 or 2025.
Please advice me about the various things I should be doing study and training wise, before being able to be a practising psychotherapist in the UK.

Your suggestions will be highly appreciated.

Thx.

Sanjay
Original post by Sanjay89
Good day.

I was an international student in London.
I graduated in Bsc ( Economics, Finance and Management ).

I want to change my path, and be a practising psychotherapist in the UK.

1) What further courses for study should I take up in the UK, in order to do so. ( I am aware of conversion courses for psychology existing in some universities also.).

2) I'd like to start study in 2024 or 2025.
Please advice me about the various things I should be doing study and training wise, before being able to be a practising psychotherapist in the UK.

Your suggestions will be highly appreciated.

Thx.

Sanjay


There are many types of therapists and for many of them, you don't need a psychology degree (or even a degree at all!). I suggest you check out the NHS website and see all the types of therapists they have here: https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/explore-roles/psychological-therapies/roles-psychological-therapies and then see their entry requirements. It'll say what course you need to take and then you can go research that and see how to apply :smile:
Original post by Sanjay89
Good day.
I was an international student in London.
I graduated in Bsc ( Economics, Finance and Management ).
I want to change my path, and be a practising psychotherapist in the UK.
1) What further courses for study should I take up in the UK, in order to do so. ( I am aware of conversion courses for psychology existing in some universities also.).
2) I'd like to start study in 2024 or 2025.
Please advice me about the various things I should be doing study and training wise, before being able to be a practising psychotherapist in the UK.
Your suggestions will be highly appreciated.
Thx.
Sanjay

Hello! This really depends on what type of therapy you would like to get into. As already stated, there are some types of therapy that don't require a degree if that is what you are into! If you are leaning more towards the clinical (or forensic) side of therapy and would like the become a clinical psychologist, then the path is slightly more complicated. To achieve this, you would first need to complete a BPS accredited psychology conversion MSc as you mentioned before. During and after this, you would want to try and get as much relevant work experience as possible. Then you would aim to get onto a DClinPsy programme, which are quite competitive but not impossible to get into!
So overall, I would recommend doing some in- depth research into different types of therapy and what you think would match your strengths and interests the most.
Good luck with everything in the future!
-Kat (2nd year psychology undergraduate at Lancaster University)
Psychotherapist isnt a protected title.
Are you after doing the observational studies masters then clincial training?
I've long been interested in developing public speaking and found a great public speaking courses london from Alphazenitude. The program is extensive and includes both theory and practice. I particularly liked the trainer's approach to help me overcome my fear of public speaking and improve my public speaking skills. Recommended!
Original post by tilmipilme
I've long been interested in developing public speaking and found a great public speaking courses london from Alphazenitude. The program is extensive and includes both theory and practice. I particularly liked the trainer's approach to help me overcome my fear of public speaking and improve my public speaking skills. Recommended!

Maybe you should have invested your money into a reading course, as your reply is irrelevant to this thread.

Greg
Original post by greg tony
Maybe you should have invested your money into a reading course, as your reply is irrelevant to this thread.
Greg

they're in an MLM
Original post by Scotland Yard
There are many types of therapists and for many of them, you don't need a psychology degree (or even a degree at all!). I suggest you check out the NHS website and see all the types of therapists they have here: https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/explore-roles/psychological-therapies/roles-psychological-therapies and then see their entry requirements. It'll say what course you need to take and then you can go research that and see how to apply :smile:


Registered to practice psychotherapists do need a degree, typically at post grad level and additional training
Original post by Froggo123
Registered to practice psychotherapists do need a degree, typically at post grad level and additional training

yes, but if you read wider, people have advised this. It depends what is meant by therapist, psychotherapist is not a protected title neither is psychologist for that matter.

This isnt a contradiction to the quote you replied to "many types of therapist and for many of them you dont need a psychology degree" is wholly accurate
Original post by wanga_wanga
yes, but if you read wider, people have advised this. It depends what is meant by therapist, psychotherapist is not a protected title neither is psychologist for that matter.
This isnt a contradiction to the quote you replied to "many types of therapist and for many of them you dont need a psychology degree" is wholly accurate


The originally posted specifically specified Psychotherapist, and working for the NHS you need a degree for this
Original post by Froggo123
The originally posted specifically specified Psychotherapist, and working for the NHS you need a degree for this

OK, you're not mistaken are you?. There was several replies about this and this wasn't the one you replied to.

Nevertheless an international student may not understand the psychotherapist distinction, nor did they mention the NHS that was the one you replied to.

As I originally stated you do not need a psychology degree for this anyway, to be registered with the UKCP you need to complete the masters in observational studies before you're even eligible for the four year in place clinical training. Its a almost unbelievable this doesn't constitute a doctorate to be honest.

Not many NHS departments actually use them. Mine did but it was seen more of an anomaly in the network

Psychotherapist is not a protected title.
Original post by wanga_wanga
OK, you're not mistaken are you?. There was several replies about this and this wasn't the one you replied to.
Nevertheless an international student may not understand the psychotherapist distinction, nor did they mention the NHS that was the one you replied to.
As I originally stated you do not need a psychology degree for this anyway, to be registered with the UKCP you need to complete the masters in observational studies before you're even eligible for the four year in place clinical training. Its a almost unbelievable this doesn't constitute a doctorate to be honest.
Not many NHS departments actually use them. Mine did but it was seen more of an anomaly in the network
Psychotherapist is not a protected title.


The post I first replied to talked about "therapist" despite the original poster talking about psychotherapist which is more specific in the UK, despite it not being protected, in the UK to be a REGISTERED psychotherapist (as I stated) you need a degree, I did NOT say psychotherapy degree, just degree. I chose not to assume that just because someone is an international student, they don't know the psychotherapy distinction. It would be rude to assume that especially when they are thinking about it seriously enough to be a future career. i only mentioned NHS bc it's one of the most common places a psychotherapist works aside from private practice.
Original post by Froggo123
The post I first replied to talked about "therapist" despite the original poster talking about psychotherapist which is more specific in the UK, despite it not being protected, in the UK to be a REGISTERED psychotherapist (as I stated) you need a degree, I did NOT say psychotherapy degree, just degree. I chose not to assume that just because someone is an international student, they don't know the psychotherapy distinction. It would be rude to assume that especially when they are thinking about it seriously enough to be a future career. i only mentioned NHS bc it's one of the most common places a psychotherapist works aside from private practice.

dear me

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