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How Shakespeare present supernatural in Macbeth act 4 scene 1

Can anyone help me write 2 paragraphs on this
SECOND WITCH
By the pricking of my thumbs, Something wicked this way comes.
Open, locks,
Whoever knocks.
Enter Macbeth.
МАСВЕТН
How now, you secret, black, and midnight hags?
What is 't you do?
ALL
A deed without a name.
MACBTH
I conjure you by that which you profess (Howe'er you come to know it, answer me.
Though you untie the winds and let them fight Against the churches, though the yeasty waves Confound and swallow navigation up,
Though bladed corn be lodged and trees blown down,
Though castles topple on their warders' heads, Though palaces and pyramids do slope Their heads to their foundations, though the treasure
Of nature's germens? tumble fall together?
Even till destruction sicken, answer me To what I ask you.
FIRST WITCH
Speak.
SECOND WITCH
Demand.
THIRD WITCH
We'll answer.
FIRST WITCH
Say if th' hadst rather hear it from our mouths Or from our masters'.
МАСВЕТН
Call 'em. Let me see 'em.
FIRST WITCH
Pour in sow's blood that hath eaten Her nine farrow; grease that's sweaten

The question is how does Shakespeare present supernatural in this
(edited 8 months ago)
Try these YouTube videos

https://youtu.be/WLoXrK4ZAYY?feature=shared

It’s a Mr Bruff analysis of act 4 scene 1

https://youtu.be/jwp79ko9n7c?feature=shared

Or this video


Also here are some of my analysis of this:

. ‘Though the yesty waves confound and swallow navigation up.’ James I believed that witches had attempted to sink his ship, and wrote a book about the dangers of witches called Daemonology following this.
. ‘Though bladed corn be lodged’. Witches were often blamed for causing bad harvest.
. ‘Let them fight against the churches.’ Witchcraft was heresy, because it went against god and disturbed the divine right of kings. This is also shown in ‘though palaces and pyramids do slope’
. ‘Black and midnight hats’ colour association with death and hell
. Witches dialogue is in Trochaic tetrameter - this causes a sense of unease

Overall Shakespeare does create a dark atmosphere around the witches, and a sense of ease, presenting them as evil forces. When we look closer at the context, it shows that this view and presentation of witches is demonstrative of the Jacobean era at the time.

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