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macbet practice answer

My teachers aren't marking practice questions atm because we just finished our mocks so theyre busy with that. would anyone be able to briefly mark this answer out of 34? i didnt finish it yet, i usually aim for 4 and a mini 5th one (not including my intro and conclusion). im beginning to start aiming to including 4 quotes in each paragraph, but im bad at memorising quotes so this is my raw knowledge. i usually memorise quotes like 1 day before the exam, my long term memory sucks.

"Explore how Shakespeare presents the relationship between Macbeth and Lady Macbeth.



At the beginning of the play, Macbeth’s relationship between Lady Macbeth is portrayed to be equal and fair. The audience is exposed to Macbeth’s letter to his wife, whom he claims “my dearest partner in greatness,” which highlights how he views Lady Macbeth as his equal. Macbeth’s use of the key noun “partner” clearly suggests that his perspective on his wife is that he believes she is someone of his own league. Audiences may think that Shakespeare wrote this line at the start of the play to give them the impression that their relationship is equal. Alternatively, jacobean audiences may interpret this as immoral. This is because a woman and a man in a relationship should not be equal, in fact the man should have a higher status. Jacobean audiences may link this to how Lady Macbeth may have sought power in order to be referred to as the same league as her own husband. Therefore, Shakespeare has portrayed their relationship as abnormal, regarding the fact that Lady Macbeth appears to have gained power in a relationship where she shouldn’t have. This use of collective language and equality is seen as Macbeth also regards her of his status when he says that “we shall proceed no further in this business,” using collective pronouns. The collective pronoun “we” furthermore suggests that Macbeth truly believes that his wife is equal to himself, as she is referred to as the same kind of person as him. Moreover, Jacobean audiences may feel shocked that their relationship is equal and shares power, as they may think that Lady Macbeth is not supposed to have this kind of power.

Throughout the play, Macbeth’s relationship between Lady Macbeth appears to be unfair and imbalanced regarding power. Lady Macbeth’s assertive character clearly dominates against Macbeth’s vulnerable, emotional one. Lady Macbeth’s conniving messages to Macbeth, telling him to “look the innocent flower but be the serpent under’t” clearly illustrate how Lady Macbeth easily tries to torment Macbeth into obeying her commands. The idea of being an “innocent flower” links to positive connotations of purity and honesty. This is significant as it heavily juxtaposes against the following statement regarding the command of being “the serpent under’t”. The key imperative verb “under’t” highlights how Lady Macbeth commands Macbeth to be sly and sneakily be a “serpent”, an evil and deceiving character, whilst portraying himself as a pure and “innocent flower”. This clearly demonstrates how Lady Macbeth confidently embraces her power and superior character against her inferior husband. A Jacobean audience may feel appalled at Lady Macbeth’s behaviour, as a woman of this time should not be commanding a husband. She should be the one under his command. Shakespeare intentionally wrote his characters in this way so that the audience would automatically understand the power indifference between the two characters and their relationship, rather than offering the generic doting wife and the commanding husband.

Moreover, Lady Macbeth’s vociferous character continues to command her husband as she uses very assertive words that enforce her dominating allure. Lady Macbeth demands Macbeth to “give” her the daggers, rather than asking for it politely as expected during the Jacobean era. The imperative verb “give” significantly portrays the power indifference within Lady Macbeth and Macbeth’s relationship, as it furthermore emphasises on how Lady Macbeth feels as though she is the one who holds the power in their relationship. Lady Macbeth continues to use this type of imperative language throughout the play, commanding him to “go get” water. Shakespeare’s use of imperative language through Lady Macbeth’s character carefully portrays Lady Macbeth’s character, and how she easily dominates him without feeling a hint of fear. Jacobean audiences would be able to link her character to their relationship, as it clearly alludes the idea that Macbeth does not hold as much power in a relationship compared to the typical relationship during the Jacobean era.

Throughout the play, Macbeth begins to gain power in the relationship again as he
"
Reply 1
Hi there, I did my English Lit GCSE last year. I didn't do Macbeth, so I don't think I'd be able to mark this accurately, but give some advice that may be of use :smile:

It seems to me that 4-5 paragraphs is too much - I'd aim for 3 (or even 2) larger ones, as this will help you to explore your points in greater detail - you have plenty of technical analysis, but add more exploration of ideas - Why is Shakespeare presenting the relationship between Lady Macbeth and Macbeth in this way? What wider ideas about women/society/people etc is Shakespeare exploring/arguing through them? (not just ideas about the play). Technical analysis is just the tool that helps you to back up your claim about what Shakespeare is saying.

With regards to structure, I would suggests writing paragraphs by theme. E.g, think of three different aspects of the relationship between Macbeth and Lady Macbeth, and explore one in each paragraph. Always remember to start your paragraphs with a topic sentence (like you did in your first paragraph) such as 'Shakespeare presents the relationship between Macbeth and Lady Macbeth as....'

I don't think you actually need as many as 4 quotes per paragraph (helps with your revision problem!) - I was told to use max 3, as otherwise you can't go into enough detail with your analysis and your linking exploration of ideas/themes. In my actual exam, I got 30/30 in the essay I only used about 6 quotes total in, as I had gone into the most detail about the ideas of the play. Remember, you can also use elements of the plot in place of quotes if it is more relevant.

So in general, I'd say restructure your paragraphs in future essays, exploring fewer points in more detail - focus on the wider ideas that Shakespeare is exploring, not just ideas his is exploring about their relationship.
Start off with a topic sentence that makes a declarative statement about their relationship, use your quotes and in-depth analysis to prove your declarative statement is true, and then link this to the wider ideas that Shakespeare is exploring - he'll be presenting them as equal and fair for an important reason.

Sorry for the massive-ass reply, but hope it's useful/makes sense!
(edited 2 months ago)
Reply 2
Original post by imhomo2017
My teachers aren't marking practice questions atm because we just finished our mocks so theyre busy with that. would anyone be able to briefly mark this answer out of 34? i didnt finish it yet, i usually aim for 4 and a mini 5th one (not including my intro and conclusion). im beginning to start aiming to including 4 quotes in each paragraph, but im bad at memorising quotes so this is my raw knowledge. i usually memorise quotes like 1 day before the exam, my long term memory sucks.
"Explore how Shakespeare presents the relationship between Macbeth and Lady Macbeth.
At the beginning of the play, Macbeth’s relationship between Lady Macbeth is portrayed to be equal and fair. The audience is exposed to Macbeth’s letter to his wife, whom he claims “my dearest partner in greatness,” which highlights how he views Lady Macbeth as his equal. Macbeth’s use of the key noun “partner” clearly suggests that his perspective on his wife is that he believes she is someone of his own league. Audiences may think that Shakespeare wrote this line at the start of the play to give them the impression that their relationship is equal. Alternatively, jacobean audiences may interpret this as immoral. This is because a woman and a man in a relationship should not be equal, in fact the man should have a higher status. Jacobean audiences may link this to how Lady Macbeth may have sought power in order to be referred to as the same league as her own husband. Therefore, Shakespeare has portrayed their relationship as abnormal, regarding the fact that Lady Macbeth appears to have gained power in a relationship where she shouldn’t have. This use of collective language and equality is seen as Macbeth also regards her of his status when he says that “we shall proceed no further in this business,” using collective pronouns. The collective pronoun “we” furthermore suggests that Macbeth truly believes that his wife is equal to himself, as she is referred to as the same kind of person as him. Moreover, Jacobean audiences may feel shocked that their relationship is equal and shares power, as they may think that Lady Macbeth is not supposed to have this kind of power.
Throughout the play, Macbeth’s relationship between Lady Macbeth appears to be unfair and imbalanced regarding power. Lady Macbeth’s assertive character clearly dominates against Macbeth’s vulnerable, emotional one. Lady Macbeth’s conniving messages to Macbeth, telling him to “look the innocent flower but be the serpent under’t” clearly illustrate how Lady Macbeth easily tries to torment Macbeth into obeying her commands. The idea of being an “innocent flower” links to positive connotations of purity and honesty. This is significant as it heavily juxtaposes against the following statement regarding the command of being “the serpent under’t”. The key imperative verb “under’t” highlights how Lady Macbeth commands Macbeth to be sly and sneakily be a “serpent”, an evil and deceiving character, whilst portraying himself as a pure and “innocent flower”. This clearly demonstrates how Lady Macbeth confidently embraces her power and superior character against her inferior husband. A Jacobean audience may feel appalled at Lady Macbeth’s behaviour, as a woman of this time should not be commanding a husband. She should be the one under his command. Shakespeare intentionally wrote his characters in this way so that the audience would automatically understand the power indifference between the two characters and their relationship, rather than offering the generic doting wife and the commanding husband.
Moreover, Lady Macbeth’s vociferous character continues to command her husband as she uses very assertive words that enforce her dominating allure. Lady Macbeth demands Macbeth to “give” her the daggers, rather than asking for it politely as expected during the Jacobean era. The imperative verb “give” significantly portrays the power indifference within Lady Macbeth and Macbeth’s relationship, as it furthermore emphasises on how Lady Macbeth feels as though she is the one who holds the power in their relationship. Lady Macbeth continues to use this type of imperative language throughout the play, commanding him to “go get” water. Shakespeare’s use of imperative language through Lady Macbeth’s character carefully portrays Lady Macbeth’s character, and how she easily dominates him without feeling a hint of fear. Jacobean audiences would be able to link her character to their relationship, as it clearly alludes the idea that Macbeth does not hold as much power in a relationship compared to the typical relationship during the Jacobean era.
Throughout the play, Macbeth begins to gain power in the relationship again as he
"
I think the essay is great! I love how you are exploring the whole text, and the ideas are definitely thoughtful, so i think you would get into high level 5. I would suggest maybe cutting some parts out of your first paragraph to save time because it seems a bit repetitive. If you are able to write this much in an exam plus the final paragraph and an intro and conclusion thats amazing. But personally i might combine the second and third paragraph because the ideas are very similar and it will save time and means you will have to write less. I think three body paragraphs is more than enough, i was only taught to write 2 large ones (one about the extract and the other about the rest of the text). You embedded the context really nicely, but try to include more of the writer's wider message.

Perhaps Shakespeare gave Lady Macbeth power at the start of the play, but made it diminish over time to show how women who subvert their expectations in Jacobean society will eventually experience their peripeteia. This could be a warning against women achieving any kind of power by revealing the chaos caused by Lady Macbeth's interference with Macbeth's ambition. Perhaps Lady Macbeth is her husband's "spur" - the driving force of his hamartia, ambition. You might also want to argue that Lady Macbeth is a supernatural character as she calls upon the spirits to "unsex" her and "take my milk for gall". This demonstrates how the only way for women in society to gain power is through the supernatural. You can then link this to how Lady Macbeth uses her supernatural power to manipulate and coerce her husband into the regicide; therefore having a dominating relationship with her husband driven by her supernatural power. Shakespeare does this to highlight the dangers of the supernatural as Lady Macbeth's manipulative acts lead to her husband's death as well as hers. This would deter any association with the supernatural and generate fear from the audience towards witches as Lady Macbeth sold herself to the devil in order to gain power in her relationship with Macbeth. This may also discourage the mistreatment of women out of fear of their possible supernatural abilities.

I would also recommend layers of analysis and alternative interpretations to get into level 6.
I was taught that you can't really get into the higher levels without saying something crazy or really unusual. I guess the examiners read so many similar essays that when they see a crazy idea they really like it.

Hope this helps!
(edited 2 months ago)
Reply 3
Original post by User_09
I think the essay is great! I love how you are exploring the whole text, and the ideas are definitely thoughtful, so i think you would get into high level 5. I would suggest maybe cutting some parts out of your first paragraph to save time because it seems a bit repetitive. If you are able to write this much in an exam plus the final paragraph and an intro and conclusion thats amazing. But personally i might combine the second and third paragraph because the ideas are very similar and it will save time and means you will have to write less. I think three body paragraphs is more than enough, i was only taught to write 2 large ones (one about the extract and the other about the rest of the text). You embedded the context really nicely, but try to include more of the writer's wider message.
Perhaps Shakespeare gave Lady Macbeth power at the start of the play, but made it diminish over time to show how women who subvert their expectations in Jacobean society will eventually experience their peripeteia. This could be a warning against women achieving any kind of power by revealing the chaos caused by Lady Macbeth's interference with Macbeth's ambition. Perhaps Lady Macbeth is her husband's "spur" - the driving force of his hamartia, ambition. You might also want to argue that Lady Macbeth is a supernatural character as she calls upon the spirits to "unsex" her and "take my milk for gall". This demonstrates how the only way for women in society to gain power is through the supernatural. You can then link this to how Lady Macbeth uses her supernatural power to manipulate and coerce her husband into the regicide; therefore having a dominating relationship with her husband driven by her supernatural power. Shakespeare does this to highlight the dangers of the supernatural as Lady Macbeth's manipulative acts lead to her husband's death as well as hers. This would deter any association with the supernatural and generate fear from the audience towards witches as Lady Macbeth sold herself to the devil in order to gain power in her relationship with Macbeth. This may also discourage the mistreatment of women out of fear of their possible supernatural abilities.
I would also recommend layers of analysis and alternative interpretations to get into level 6.
I was taught that you can't really get into the higher levels without saying something crazy or really unusual. I guess the examiners read so many similar essays that when they see a crazy idea they really like it.
Hope this helps!
thank you for this feedback!! i hope this isnt a bother, but i tried using this advice and wrote a para on aic, if its not too much to ask would you be able to take a look at this?

With the arrival of the inspector, the divide between the social classes and their take on society becomes more apparent, since the Birlings adopt a close minded mindset and display their ignorance regarding the chaotic society. The Birlings show signs of ignorance, as they are trapping themselves with "pink and intimate" lighting, which is then put an end to as the Inspector's reveal morphs the light into "brighter and harder" lighting. The metaphor "pink" symbolises joy and bliss, perhaps linking to how the Birlings live in bliss through a bubble of ignorance. This "pink" and blissful atmosphere is juxtaposed by the "harder" lighting, insinuating that their ignorance had been deconstructed once the Inspector told them the truth about society. The "harder" lighting that refers to the hardships and suffering in the reality of society bursts the intimate atmosphere that the capitalists hide behind. Priestley is suggesting that the ruling class is ttrying to hide away from the suffering society in order to keep their satisfactory life going without interruption. Through the proxy of the Inspector, Priestley demonstrates how the rich must face the consequences of their capitalist lifestyle in order to demolish capitalism. The audience is immediately faced with this change in lighting so that they are able to link how the capitalists are the ones who must change throughout the play and through society; to destroy inequality and unfairness. Alternatively, the sudden change in lighting after the Inspector's introduction illustrates how he is a very powerful individual. The audience will link how the character who believes unfairness in society must be removed, also has the power to change the atmosphere of the story. The audience would feel compelled to be influenced by the powerful one in the play, therefore adopt the socialist ideology that unfairness in society is prominent and must be removed to proscribe further chaos.
Reply 4
This is amazing. I think it would definitely be level 6 since you went into depth about the writer's wider message and spoke about alternative interpretations as well as characterization. If you write a whole essay as good as this, it would definitely be a grade 9 essay.
Original post by imhomo2017
My teachers aren't marking practice questions atm because we just finished our mocks so theyre busy with that. would anyone be able to briefly mark this answer out of 34? i didnt finish it yet, i usually aim for 4 and a mini 5th one (not including my intro and conclusion). im beginning to start aiming to including 4 quotes in each paragraph, but im bad at memorising quotes so this is my raw knowledge. i usually memorise quotes like 1 day before the exam, my long term memory sucks.
"Explore how Shakespeare presents the relationship between Macbeth and Lady Macbeth.
At the beginning of the play, Macbeth’s relationship between Lady Macbeth is portrayed to be equal and fair. The audience is exposed to Macbeth’s letter to his wife, whom he claims “my dearest partner in greatness,” which highlights how he views Lady Macbeth as his equal. Macbeth’s use of the key noun “partner” clearly suggests that his perspective on his wife is that he believes she is someone of his own league. Audiences may think that Shakespeare wrote this line at the start of the play to give them the impression that their relationship is equal. Alternatively, jacobean audiences may interpret this as immoral. This is because a woman and a man in a relationship should not be equal, in fact the man should have a higher status. Jacobean audiences may link this to how Lady Macbeth may have sought power in order to be referred to as the same league as her own husband. Therefore, Shakespeare has portrayed their relationship as abnormal, regarding the fact that Lady Macbeth appears to have gained power in a relationship where she shouldn’t have. This use of collective language and equality is seen as Macbeth also regards her of his status when he says that “we shall proceed no further in this business,” using collective pronouns. The collective pronoun “we” furthermore suggests that Macbeth truly believes that his wife is equal to himself, as she is referred to as the same kind of person as him. Moreover, Jacobean audiences may feel shocked that their relationship is equal and shares power, as they may think that Lady Macbeth is not supposed to have this kind of power.
Throughout the play, Macbeth’s relationship between Lady Macbeth appears to be unfair and imbalanced regarding power. Lady Macbeth’s assertive character clearly dominates against Macbeth’s vulnerable, emotional one. Lady Macbeth’s conniving messages to Macbeth, telling him to “look the innocent flower but be the serpent under’t” clearly illustrate how Lady Macbeth easily tries to torment Macbeth into obeying her commands. The idea of being an “innocent flower” links to positive connotations of purity and honesty. This is significant as it heavily juxtaposes against the following statement regarding the command of being “the serpent under’t”. The key imperative verb “under’t” highlights how Lady Macbeth commands Macbeth to be sly and sneakily be a “serpent”, an evil and deceiving character, whilst portraying himself as a pure and “innocent flower”. This clearly demonstrates how Lady Macbeth confidently embraces her power and superior character against her inferior husband. A Jacobean audience may feel appalled at Lady Macbeth’s behaviour, as a woman of this time should not be commanding a husband. She should be the one under his command. Shakespeare intentionally wrote his characters in this way so that the audience would automatically understand the power indifference between the two characters and their relationship, rather than offering the generic doting wife and the commanding husband.
Moreover, Lady Macbeth’s vociferous character continues to command her husband as she uses very assertive words that enforce her dominating allure. Lady Macbeth demands Macbeth to “give” her the daggers, rather than asking for it politely as expected during the Jacobean era. The imperative verb “give” significantly portrays the power indifference within Lady Macbeth and Macbeth’s relationship, as it furthermore emphasises on how Lady Macbeth feels as though she is the one who holds the power in their relationship. Lady Macbeth continues to use this type of imperative language throughout the play, commanding him to “go get” water. Shakespeare’s use of imperative language through Lady Macbeth’s character carefully portrays Lady Macbeth’s character, and how she easily dominates him without feeling a hint of fear. Jacobean audiences would be able to link her character to their relationship, as it clearly alludes the idea that Macbeth does not hold as much power in a relationship compared to the typical relationship during the Jacobean era.
Throughout the play, Macbeth begins to gain power in the relationship again as he
"
are u in yr 10 or yr 11?
Reply 6
Original post by studyfor9s
are u in yr 10 or yr 11?
11 lol i have my gcses in 2 months 😅

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