How is the theme of supernatural presented in Macbeth? ESSAY FEEDBACK

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tobynorth_
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Could anyone give any feedback on this AQA GCSE essay I wrote, 'How is the theme of supernatural presented in Macbeth?'.

The supernatural is important throughout Macbeth, as it was in Jacobean society, and is especially prevalent through the Witches and Lady Macbeth.

Shakespeare first presents supernatural through the witches chant that ‘fair is foul, and foul is fair’. The fact they talk in rhyme makes them seem strange, and links to theme of supernatural. A Jacobean audience would fear this supernatural behaviour, putting them on edge from the start of the play. The witches omniscience is mysterious and links to to the supernatural. For example, the deception in ‘fair is foul’ foreshadows the whole plot in that Macbeth deceives Duncan in order to be king. Furthermore the noun ‘foul’ may foreshadow Macbeth’s descent into tyranny and the guilt suffered by both him and Lady Macbeth. This ability to predict future events, would certainly lead audiences believe the witches were speaking to the supernatural. Therefore the theme of supernatural is presented through the witches tone and omniscience.

The supernatural is also presented through Lady Macbeth talking to the evil spirits, where she demands ‘take my milk for gall’. The fact Lady Macbeth is talking to spirits is a clear link to the supernatural. The fact she believes they can take her feminine characteristics (‘milk’) shows how powerful the supernatural were seen in Jacobean society. Furthermore the noun ‘gall’ may represent how evil and harmful the supernatural was seen. The imperative ‘take’ may also be Shakespeare referencing the hash treatment of those suspected to be involved with the supernatural, for example witches were often burned alive. Therefore the supernatural is presented as powerful and feared through Lady Macbeth’s soliloquy, in which she interacts with evil spirits.

The writer later presents the supernatural through Macbeth’s visions, in which he questions ‘Is this a dagger which I see before me’. The fact Macbeth is seeing a floating dagger is a clear form of the supernatural. The fact the supernatural is essentially pressing Macbeth to murder Duncan, is Shakespeare purposefully highlighting how evil the supernatural is as it is not only telling him to kill - but kill a king. This would of been especially shocking in Jacobean society, as Kings would have been seen as untouchable and protected by the divine right of kings. Furthermore the fact Macbeth has, here, been driven to insanity by a supernatural prophecy, further emphases the power of the supernatural. Therefore the supernatural is again presented as powerful through its control over Macbeth.

Shakespeare finally presents the supernatural through Lady Macbeth’s madness where she cries ‘Out, damned spot! Out, I say!’. The adjective ‘damned’ suggests Lady Macbeth will be subjected to eternal punishment in hell for her actions. This is especially ironic, as she called on the supernatural yet is now being punished by it. Jacobean audiences would most likely see this as punishment from god. The repetition of the verb ‘out’ reflects Jacobean views of supernatural, as it was something feared and therefore many wanted it gone. The phrase ‘I say’, also makes her seem desperate compared to the omnipotent supernatural. Therefore the supernatural is presented as vindictive and unwanted - but of course powerful.

Overall, Shakespeare presents the supernatural as omnipotent throughout Macbeth. Through its control over Macbeth’s future, ability to take Lady Macbeth’s ‘milk’ and by the end ability to drive Lady Macbeth to madness. However Shakespeare does also try to represent the Jacobean view of supernatural, in that it was unwanted - most likely to appease audiences at the time.
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P.S.
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(Original post by tobynorth_)
Could anyone give any feedback on this AQA GCSE essay I wrote, 'How is the theme of supernatural presented in Macbeth?'.

The supernatural is important throughout Macbeth, as it was in Jacobean society, and is especially prevalent through the Witches and Lady Macbeth.

Shakespeare first presents supernatural through the witches chant that ‘fair is foul, and foul is fair’. The fact they talk in rhyme makes them seem strange, and links to theme of supernatural. A Jacobean audience would fear this supernatural behaviour, putting them on edge from the start of the play. The witches omniscience is mysterious and links to to the supernatural. For example, the deception in ‘fair is foul’ foreshadows the whole plot in that Macbeth deceives Duncan in order to be king. Furthermore the noun ‘foul’ may foreshadow Macbeth’s descent into tyranny and the guilt suffered by both him and Lady Macbeth. This ability to predict future events, would certainly lead audiences believe the witches were speaking to the supernatural. Therefore the theme of supernatural is presented through the witches tone and omniscience.

The supernatural is also presented through Lady Macbeth talking to the evil spirits, where she demands ‘take my milk for gal’. The fact Lady Macbeth is talking to spirits is a clear link to the supernatural. The fact she believes they can take her feminine characteristics (‘milk’) shows how powerful the supernatural were seen in Jacobean society. Furthermore the noun ‘gal’ may represent how evil and harmful the supernatural was seen. The imperative ‘take’ may also be Shakespeare referencing the hash treatment of those suspected to be involved with the supernatural, for example witches were often burned alive. Therefore the supernatural is presented as powerful and feared through Lady Macbeth’s soliloquy, in which she interacts with evil spirits.

The writer later presents the supernatural through Macbeth’s visions, in which he questions ‘Is this a dagger which I see before me’. The fact Macbeth is seeing a floating dagger is a clear form of the supernatural. The fact the supernatural is essentially pressing Macbeth to murder Duncan, is Shakespeare purposefully highlighting how evil the supernatural is as it is not only telling him to kill - but kill a king. This would of been especially shocking in Jacobean society, as Kings would have been seen as untouchable and protected by the divine right of kings. Furthermore the fact Macbeth has, here, been driven to insanity by a supernatural prophecy, further emphases the power of the supernatural. Therefore the supernatural is again presented as powerful through its control over Macbeth.

Shakespeare finally presents the supernatural through Lady Macbeth’s madness where she cries ‘Out, damned spot! Out, I say!’. The adjective ‘damned’ suggests Lady Macbeth will be subjected to eternal punishment in hell for her actions. This is especially ironic, as she called on the supernatural yet is now being punished by it. Jacobean audiences would most likely see this as punishment from god. The repetition of the verb ‘out’ reflects Jacobean views of supernatural, as it was something feared and therefore many wanted it gone. The phrase ‘I say’, also makes her seem desperate compared to the omnipotent supernatural. Therefore the supernatural is presented as vindictive and unwanted - but of course powerful.

Overall, Shakespeare presents the supernatural as omnipotent throughout Macbeth. Through its control over Macbeth’s future, ability to take Lady Macbeth’s ‘milk’ and by the end ability to drive Lady Macbeth to madness. However Shakespeare does also try to represent the Jacobean view of supernatural, in that it was unwanted - most likely to appease audiences at the time.
Your essay is really good - whats your predicted grade? I'm assuming its at least an 8
I can't really comment when I myself am quite iffy with English but normally I wouldn't have my first sentence to be a quote - I'd usually start with a topic sentence. However, that's just the structure I like to follow and your points are quite clear without the topic sentence anyway.
good luck in your exams
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bloodygoth
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I won't be able to say how good it is in accordance to GCSE level as I'm not sure what the AOs being targeted for this question are.

However this is a very good answer and even in A-level would be considered to be a clear and concise answer that effectively links back to the question. The only difference with A-level is that there is more detail.

Overall good answer. Little tip - stop repeating 'the fact'
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tobynorth_
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(Original post by P.S.)
Your essay is really good - whats your predicted grade? I'm assuming its at least an 8
I can't really comment when I myself am quite iffy with English but normally I wouldn't have my first sentence to be a quote - I'd usually start with a topic sentence. However, that's just the structure I like to follow and your points are quite clear without the topic sentence anyway.
good luck in your exams
No! Only a 6, but my teacher is a bitt... Yeah, I see what you mean. But that structure is litereally taught everyone at GCSE (PEEDL)

I suppose I could change it to be more original, but atm not too worried about that!

Thanks for the feedback though!
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tobynorth_
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(Original post by bloodygoth)
I won't be able to say how good it is in accordance to GCSE level as I'm not sure what the AOs being targeted for this question are.

However this is a very good answer and even in A-level would be considered to be a clear and concise answer that effectively links back to the question. The only difference with A-level is that there is more detail.

Overall good answer. Little tip - stop repeating 'the fact'
Oh thanks, yh I will! Here's the mark scheme used to grade the AQA Lit papers, http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resource...-87021-SMS.PDF. Obviously a diff question, but same AOs apply.
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bloodygoth
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(Original post by tobynorth_)
Oh thanks, yh I will! Here's the mark scheme used to grade the AQA Lit papers, http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resource...-87021-SMS.PDF. Obviously a diff question, but same AOs apply.
I think this would definitely be a top level answer. I look at the specimen exemplar answer and compared it to the answer you wrote. You answer covers all AO's effectively and seems to be what is expected to achieve high marks. Well done!
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mkmittens
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[QUOTE=tobynorth_;77557562]Could anyone give any feedback on this AQA GCSE essay I wrote, 'How is the theme of supernatural presented in Macbeth?'.

Hi I am a English Lit A level student. I just read your essay and it seems really good f but couldn't help but make a modifies version of the paragraph. I really like choice of language which is very good for a GCSE student.
My advice is that if you want to secure a grade A/A* which is 8/9 I believe, approach the question with sensitively. What I mean by this is be more specific about what supernatural means, pick out specific examples from Macbeth and quotes (you only picked one quote in one paragraph) to back your points. This will hopefully sharpen your paragraph structure and help you get the higher grades.

Also make more structural and language analysis, explicitly mentioning authorial methods used to shape meaning.

I tried to modify the first paragraph to demonstrate what I mean by being more specific because the examiners want to know the youn know your texts very well (I don't know Macbeth in detail so sorry for any mistakes if made ).

Hope this helps. Very best of luck for your exams.


Shakespeare conveys the supernatural through the chorus of witches chanting, ‘fair is foul and foul is fair.’ The rhyme scheme creates a mysterious and gothic atmosphere which seems to foreshadow the disturbing events of ‘foul’ play of murder and bloodshed that awaits form the hands of Macbeth. This instantly puts the audience at edge, creating an unnerving experience. A Jacobean audience recognise witches as a symbol of bad omen so this introduction to the play would have instantly gave them the sign that the events of the play will later unfold more dark, disturbing, eerie and supernatural events. Also, the witches’ omniscience adds to the mysterious and ethereal nature of the play. For example, the deception in ‘fair is foul’ foreshadows the whole plot in Macbeth deceives Duncan in order to become by plotting and carrying out his murder. Furthermore, the noun ‘foul’ may foreshadow Macbeth’s descent into tyranny and the guilt suffered by both him and Lady Macbeth. This ability to predict future events would certainly lead members of the audience to believe the witches were speaking to the supernatural and conveying Macbeths misfortune fate of overwhelming feeling of guilt which inevitably leads to his own death.
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tobynorth_
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[QUOTE=mkmittens;77558278]
(Original post by tobynorth_)
Could anyone give any feedback on this AQA GCSE essay I wrote, 'How is the theme of supernatural presented in Macbeth?'.

Hi I am a English Lit A level student. I just read your essay and it seems really good f but couldn't help but make a modifies version of the paragraph. I really like choice of language which is very good for a GCSE student.
My advice is that if you want to secure a grade A/A* which is 8/9 I believe, approach the question with sensitively. What I mean by this is be more specific about what supernatural means, pick out specific examples from Macbeth and quotes (you only picked one quote in one paragraph) to back your points. This will hopefully sharpen your paragraph structure and help you get the higher grades.

Also make more structural and language analysis, explicitly mentioning authorial methods used to shape meaning.

I tried to modify the first paragraph to demonstrate what I mean by being more specific because the examiners want to know the youn know your texts very well (I don't know Macbeth in detail so sorry for any mistakes if made ).

Hope this helps. Very best of luck for your exams.


Shakespeare conveys the supernatural through the chorus of witches chanting, ‘fair is foul and foul is fair.’ The rhyme scheme creates a mysterious and gothic atmosphere which seems to foreshadow the disturbing events of ‘foul’ play of murder and bloodshed that awaits form the hands of Macbeth. This instantly puts the audience at edge, creating an unnerving experience. A Jacobean audience recognise witches as a symbol of bad omen so this introduction to the play would have instantly gave them the sign that the events of the play will later unfold more dark, disturbing, eerie and supernatural events. Also, the witches’ omniscience adds to the mysterious and ethereal nature of the play. For example, the deception in ‘fair is foul’ foreshadows the whole plot in Macbeth deceives Duncan in order to become by plotting and carrying out his murder. Furthermore, the noun ‘foul’ may foreshadow Macbeth’s descent into tyranny and the guilt suffered by both him and Lady Macbeth. This ability to predict future events would certainly lead members of the audience to believe the witches were speaking to the supernatural and conveying Macbeths misfortune fate of overwhelming feeling of guilt which inevitably leads to his own death.
ok yh thanks! So try to use more writer methods, vocabulary and try to embed extra quotes in analysis yh!
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_Muhammed_
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can someone please write a good standard (grade 8) of essay:'How does shakespeare present supernatural throughout the play of macbeth.'Also can you add in lots of relevant subject terminology
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flimsy987
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(Original post by tobynorth_)
Could anyone give any feedback on this AQA GCSE essay I wrote, 'How is the theme of supernatural presented in Macbeth?'.

The supernatural is important throughout Macbeth, as it was in Jacobean society, and is especially prevalent through the Witches and Lady Macbeth.

Shakespeare first presents supernatural through the witches chant that ‘fair is foul, and foul is fair’. The fact they talk in rhyme makes them seem strange, and links to theme of supernatural. A Jacobean audience would fear this supernatural behaviour, putting them on edge from the start of the play. The witches omniscience is mysterious and links to to the supernatural. For example, the deception in ‘fair is foul’ foreshadows the whole plot in that Macbeth deceives Duncan in order to be king. Furthermore the noun ‘foul’ may foreshadow Macbeth’s descent into tyranny and the guilt suffered by both him and Lady Macbeth. This ability to predict future events, would certainly lead audiences believe the witches were speaking to the supernatural. Therefore the theme of supernatural is presented through the witches tone and omniscience.

The supernatural is also presented through Lady Macbeth talking to the evil spirits, where she demands ‘take my milk for gall’. The fact Lady Macbeth is talking to spirits is a clear link to the supernatural. The fact she believes they can take her feminine characteristics (‘milk’) shows how powerful the supernatural were seen in Jacobean society. Furthermore the noun ‘gall’ may represent how evil and harmful the supernatural was seen. The imperative ‘take’ may also be Shakespeare referencing the hash treatment of those suspected to be involved with the supernatural, for example witches were often burned alive. Therefore the supernatural is presented as powerful and feared through Lady Macbeth’s soliloquy, in which she interacts with evil spirits.

The writer later presents the supernatural through Macbeth’s visions, in which he questions ‘Is this a dagger which I see before me’. The fact Macbeth is seeing a floating dagger is a clear form of the supernatural. The fact the supernatural is essentially pressing Macbeth to murder Duncan, is Shakespeare purposefully highlighting how evil the supernatural is as it is not only telling him to kill - but kill a king. This would of been especially shocking in Jacobean society, as Kings would have been seen as untouchable and protected by the divine right of kings. Furthermore the fact Macbeth has, here, been driven to insanity by a supernatural prophecy, further emphases the power of the supernatural. Therefore the supernatural is again presented as powerful through its control over Macbeth.

Shakespeare finally presents the supernatural through Lady Macbeth’s madness where she cries ‘Out, damned spot! Out, I say!’. The adjective ‘damned’ suggests Lady Macbeth will be subjected to eternal punishment in hell for her actions. This is especially ironic, as she called on the supernatural yet is now being punished by it. Jacobean audiences would most likely see this as punishment from god. The repetition of the verb ‘out’ reflects Jacobean views of supernatural, as it was something feared and therefore many wanted it gone. The phrase ‘I say’, also makes her seem desperate compared to the omnipotent supernatural. Therefore the supernatural is presented as vindictive and unwanted - but of course powerful.

Overall, Shakespeare presents the supernatural as omnipotent throughout Macbeth. Through its control over Macbeth’s future, ability to take Lady Macbeth’s ‘milk’ and by the end ability to drive Lady Macbeth to madness. However Shakespeare does also try to represent the Jacobean view of supernatural, in that it was unwanted - most likely to appease audiences at the time.
erm i would say its a bit too repetitive the structre that is but while it is fine, you should really try to scrap petal lol it makes your answer more conceptual and less robot like. in other words id give this about a 22 out of 30
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