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Does cambridge and oxford still allow BA students major in relevant subjects e.g. phy

In actual practice, does uni cambridge and uni oxford still allow BA students major in relevant subjects (e.g. physiology) transfer into MBBCh? I remember that years ago when I was doing a google search I found that both cambridge and oxford allows BA students to transfer into MBBCh or BTheology (because they are "higher" qualifications than BA), but I'm not sure if this regulation is no longer in practice.
Original post by ksj1526
In actual practice, does uni cambridge and uni oxford still allow BA students major in relevant subjects (e.g. physiology) transfer into MBBCh? I remember that years ago when I was doing a google search I found that both cambridge and oxford allows BA students to transfer into MBBCh or BTheology (because they are "higher" qualifications than BA), but I'm not sure if this regulation is no longer in practice.

I've never heard of that. Are you sure you're not thinking of their intercalated degree process - as all medical degree students also have to earn a BA at Oxford and Cambridge by intercalating (at Cambridge this can be done by undertaking Part II in principle in almost any subject but usually one of the natural sciences Part II subjects - at Oxford it's a much more structured programme with fewer options I gather).

You can certainly apply to the medical degree at either after having done an undergraduate degree at one or the other, either applying to standard entry medicine as a graduate (in which case as well as a good degree result, you'll need to meet the standard entry criteria for the standard entry course) or for their accelerated graduate entry medicine courses (which have separate requirements - notably Oxford requires a science degree although their interpretation of that is relatively broad).

This is still a (very) competitive process - considerably more competitive than applying to standard entry medicine as an undergraduate, and if you would meet the requirements for a bioscience or similar degree at either you'll meet the requirements for the vast majority of medical schools already. So you are inevitably better off just applying to medicine in the first instance (+/- gap year(s)).
(edited 4 months ago)
Reply 2
Original post by artful_lounger
I've never heard of that. Are you sure you're not thinking of their intercalated degree process - as all medical degree students also have to earn a BA at Oxford and Cambridge by intercalating (at Cambridge this can be done by undertaking Part II in principle in almost any subject but usually one of the natural sciences Part II subjects - at Oxford it's a much more structured programme with fewer options I gather).


I think medical courses in general used to have a bit more flexibility with transfers etc. Not sure about Oxford, but many years ago, you could for example transfer from NatSci into Medicine at Cambridge (although I'm not sure how common/difficult it was). This certainly is not allowed any more at Cambridge.

This happened at other universities too, and maybe it still does happen at other universities? Eg there'd be occasional spaces for people to transfer from biomedical sciences etc into medicine, although you'd probably have to start at year 1 again. I'm not sure if this still happens or not.
Original post by AF2Dr
I think medical courses in general used to have a bit more flexibility with transfers etc. Not sure about Oxford, but many years ago, you could for example transfer from NatSci into Medicine at Cambridge (although I'm not sure how common/difficult it was). This certainly is not allowed any more at Cambridge.

This happened at other universities too, and maybe it still does happen at other universities? Eg there'd be occasional spaces for people to transfer from biomedical sciences etc into medicine, although you'd probably have to start at year 1 again. I'm not sure if this still happens or not.

I'm not aware of this having been the case for at least the last 10 years. If by "a long time a go" you mean in the 70s and 80s then perhaps but also at the time medicine was a completely different field, and that has no real bearing on the situation today.

There are handful of biomedical sciences to medicine transfer schemes at unis, these are clearly advertised and with very detailed information about the requirements to do so successfully included. They are universally not recommended as a route into medicine as every single one requires you to meet all the standard requirements of the medical course you are transferring into anyway, there are normally only a couple (e.g. one to five at most) places available for said transfers, and basically everyone on those courses will be applying to it. So you go from a competition ratio of maybe 1/5 to 1/150, and on top of that they consider your performance in the course and thus to be successful you realistically need to be in the top 10 (not 10%, as in 10 as a number) in the entire cohort of 200-300 BMS students.

This is really a rabbit hole to nowhere. I'm not sure what you or the OP are hoping to do with this information but there is no situation in which the best option is ever not just applying to standard entry medicine as a school leaver. Unless you are a mature student with a degree already, no other route is worth consideration.
(edited 4 months ago)
Reply 4
Original post by artful_lounger
I'm not aware of this having been the case for at least the last 10 years. If by "a long time a go" you mean in the 70s and 80s then perhaps but also at the time medicine was a completely different field, and that has no real bearing on the situation today.

There are handful of biomedical sciences to medicine transfer schemes at unis, these are clearly advertised and with very detailed information about the requirements to do so successfully included. They are universally not recommended as a route into medicine as every single one requires you to meet all the standard requirements of the medical course you are transferring into anyway, there are normally only a couple (e.g. one to five at most) places available for said transfers, and basically everyone on those courses will be applying to it. So you go from a competition ratio of maybe 1/5 to 1/150, and on top of that they consider your performance in the course and thus to be successful you realistically need to be in the top 10 (not 10%, as in 10 as a number) in the entire cohort of 200-300 BMS students.

This is really a rabbit hole to nowhere. I'm not sure what you or the OP are hoping to do with this information but there is no situation in which the best option is ever not just applying to standard entry medicine as a school leaver. Unless you are a mature student with a degree already, no other route is worth consideration.


Yes, transfers from NatSci to medicine at Cambridge wouldn't have been occurring in the last 10 years. I'm not sure exactly when they stopped being technically allowed, although I don't think it was ever common. I think it was still technically possible up until perhaps roughly 2008 or so? Not sure exactly though. But yes, even if it was technically possible, I don't think it happened very much.

Eg see this old thread, at which point it was possible: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=136795

I'm not hoping to do anything with this information personally. I just saw nobody had answered OP's question, so added my comment.
Original post by AF2Dr
Yes, transfers from NatSci to medicine at Cambridge wouldn't have been occurring in the last 10 years. I'm not sure exactly when they stopped being technically allowed, although I don't think it was ever common. I think it was still technically possible up until perhaps roughly 2008 or so? Not sure exactly though. But yes, even if it was technically possible, I don't think it happened very much.

Eg see this old thread, at which point it was possible: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=136795

I'm not hoping to do anything with this information personally. I just saw nobody had answered OP's question, so added my comment.

The thread you linked is 18 years old. There are people who were born after that thread was created starting a medical degree this year. I don't think that's a really useful source of information at this rate.
Reply 6
Original post by artful_lounger
The thread you linked is 18 years old. There are people who were born after that thread was created starting a medical degree this year. I don't think that's a really useful source of information at this rate.


? I'm just saying it used to be technically possible, and it no longer is.
Reply 7
Original post by artful_lounger
The thread you linked is 18 years old. There are people who were born after that thread was created starting a medical degree this year. I don't think that's a really useful source of information at this rate.

And yet I'm still here... :lol:

It was a very, very occasional possibility back then, but I am not actually aware of anyone in our year who successfully did it (though there were a few who failed bits of the medical course and transferred the other way into NatSci). And that was a whole lifetime ago for today's Freshers!
Reply 8
Hi guys: Thank your information and advice - it is eye opening (esp one of you even managed to dig out an old post 18 years ago). No, I wasn't confusing with the intercalated degree. I think I read the regulations in late 2009-early 2011 so yeah, it is likely that the regulations back then still allows science students to transfer into medicine.

I have a Bachelor of Engineering in materials engineering and MSc 1st Hon in biological sciences, with an overseas registration and work experience as a medical laboratory technician and UK work experience as a genetic technologist. I'm passion about biomaterials but this is not a field that you can find a stable job (because all jobs are basically soly research and development), and I feel that I need a medical degree to be able to fully fledge in regenerative medicine (which again, is a passion, but not a field of solid jobs). Considering my age, I have thought about to become a clinical scientist either in biochemistry or toxicology, but the competition ratio of the admission is even more worse than the medical school, and the pay is significantly less than consultants or even registrars. So I think may be getting into medicine it is a better (although longer) option for me - the admission is less competitive than clinical scientist, the training is more comprehensive and systemetic, and the pay scales upon graduation is better. I'm thinking about ether chemical pathology or occupational medicine as my future specialty, so I can still have a reasonable OK lifestyle. I'm not going to compete for dermatology, and I think I will be too old to get into demanding specialties such as transfusion medicine or transplant surgery (which barely has any personal life due to its emergency nature).

Any advice?
(edited 4 months ago)

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