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What to do before studying law??

Hi please help!

I have received 4 offers to study law in 2024. But I studied bio, chem and psychology at A level so apart from a few days work experience I haven't much experienced a lot of what it's like to study law.

What would be the best courses (probably online) to do now, in my gap year, to help me prepare for starting uni next September?
Hi!
That is a great question. Before studying law, I also studied something compeletely different - environmental science. I was incredibly nervous when I started and had no idea what I was doing. Luckily, everyone in my class was started on an even footing.

I began prepping for my law program by reading books. I highy reccomend reading "Letters to a Law Student: A guide to studying law at university" - Its a book that details what other law students have experienced giving you a better idea what to expect and provides reccomendations. I also read other books related to areas of law that I was interested in.

Hope this helps and I am happy to answer more questions :smile:

Aleks (Law student - she/her)
(edited 2 months ago)
Reply 2
Original post by NULondon Aleks
Hi!
That is a great question. Before studying law, I also studied something compeletely different - environmental science. I was incredibly nervous when I started and had no idea what I was doing. Luckily, everyone in my class was started on an even footing.

I began prepping for my law program by reading books. I highy reccomend reading "Letters to a Law Student: A guide to studying law at university" - Its a book that details what other law students have experienced giving you a better idea what to expect and provides reccomendations. I also read other books related to areas of law that I was interested in.

Hope this helps and I am happy to answer more questions :smile:

Aleks Spasevski (Law student - she/her)

Amazing! Thank you :smile:

I do actually have a couple more questions if that's okay - I don't know anyone studying law so don't have a complete picture on what to expect - how much free time do you get? I was super stressed during my A levels and genuinely hardly ever went out or had fun with friends (which is one of the reasons I took this gap year). Would I have enough time to go out once a week or something? What about a part time job?

Any advice would be amazing! :smile:)
Reply 3
Original post by milliex_grace
Amazing! Thank you :smile:

I do actually have a couple more questions if that's okay - I don't know anyone studying law so don't have a complete picture on what to expect - how much free time do you get? I was super stressed during my A levels and genuinely hardly ever went out or had fun with friends (which is one of the reasons I took this gap year). Would I have enough time to go out once a week or something? What about a part time job?

Any advice would be amazing! :smile:)

I read Laws and got a 1st. Honestly, it's not the hardest degree in the world - especially compared to engineering and stuff, and you're mad if you don't make time to do other things -especially in 1st year. I wouldn't worry about doing any preparation before the course, there really is no need.

You should easily have time to do a sport, another society, have friends and still do really well. Just don't go over the top - learn the key concepts and then if you really want to devote extra time, spend it reading and understanding cases. It's the sort of course where understanding the core principles of each module and knowing some cases is worth 10x more than a million flashcards and lots of highlighters.
Of course!

I was worried about the course load to but in all honesty it is totally manageable. Depending on your Uni, it will be divided up between lectures and seminars. You will have enough time to go out once a week and even have a part time job. I have a part time job at my university as a student ambassador. Some of my friends have part time jobs in hospitality and retail.

My biggest advice is to set up a schedule for yourself to get work done for your classes. Many students fall behind without one because it is really easy to get into the habit of not doing work. Not every week will look the same but a schedule will make sure you are on top of everything.
My schedule for example, priotizes getting work done during the week so that on the weekends, I can take a break. It is not perfect by any means and I do work on the weekends sometimes if I have a lot of deadlines but it is totally manageable.

Don't be afraid to ask more questions. I am always happy to help. :smile:

Aleks (Law student - she/her)
Original post by milliex_grace
Hi please help!

I have received 4 offers to study law in 2024. But I studied bio, chem and psychology at A level so apart from a few days work experience I haven't much experienced a lot of what it's like to study law.

What would be the best courses (probably online) to do now, in my gap year, to help me prepare for starting uni next September?

Hi there

It is great to hear that you are looking to get some learning done before going to University.
I was actually in a similar situation as you, I took Biology, Chemistry and Maths in A levels, and decided to study Law at University.

I would echo Aleks's advice: Letters to a Law Student is a really good read, and it gives you a good insight into what it is like to study law. Other than that, I would not say I did a lot of preparation work myself.

In terms of the jump between the content from A levels to University, some students in first year did have an advantage, as they studies law during A levels. However, that is not to say the other students are disadvantaged. You do not need the foundational/ prior knowledge before entering a Law degree, as the course is designed to build up your knowledge. I found that keeping on track of my workload allowed me to catch up with other students pretty quickly. So I don't think you have to worry about that. :smile:

In a law degree, you are given a lot of free time. (this term, I only have 8 or 10 contact hours a week). University is really about learning to manage your time effectively, and if you organise your study time properly, you will have a lot of time for rest and socials. I also think a part-time job is a very good to take up during University, and you will have time for this. (Comparing to A levels again, I also did not have much time to social during A levels, but I find University much better in terms of work-life balance, especially in first year. )

Hope this helps.
Chloe
University of Kent Student Rep

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