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Had Constantinople survived the 1453 Ottoman offensive, could Byzantium have survived

for another 100 years or longer? Would the Renaissance have started in modern-day Greece rather than the Italian Peninsula instead?
Original post by ABBAForever2015
for another 100 years or longer? Would the Renaissance have started in modern-day Greece rather than the Italian Peninsula instead?

no
Original post by ABBAForever2015
for another 100 years or longer? Would the Renaissance have started in modern-day Greece rather than the Italian Peninsula instead?

the eastern roman empire could have continued if the fourth crusade hadn't mess things up ie sacking the city.
(edited 2 months ago)
Original post by jacksmith23
the eastern roman empire could have continued if the fourth crusade hadn't mess things up ie sacking the city.

I agree.
Original post by ABBAForever2015
I agree.

if you want a slightly in depth reply, i can give one.
Original post by jacksmith23
if you want a slightly in depth reply, i can give one.

Not sure...haha...afraid of costing you time
Original post by ABBAForever2015
Not sure...haha...afraid of costing you time
I mean it is a hypothetical scenario.
but hey if you ever need one explaining why then sure I could give one.

edit: spelling
(edited 1 month ago)
Reply 7
Original post by ABBAForever2015
for another 100 years or longer? Would the Renaissance have started in modern-day Greece rather than the Italian Peninsula instead?

No.

1) There was no Byzantine Empire, we should call it by its true name. Imperitus Romana (Roman Empire).

2) The Empire was basically on its knees even after reunification, it had outsourced it's navy to Venice and could not retake Anatolia. The betrayal in 1204 savaged the empire.

3) Finally, the Ottomans crossed the sea into the Balkans in 1354, at that point they had to be slaughtered or as history would show, slowly take over.

In short, the empire got lucky that it reunified but the critical mark was the Ottoman Army crossings.
No, I don't think so. For two reasons: firstly, the Ottoman Empire had the modern and battle-tested career soldiers Janissaris, plus a numerical advantage. And secondly, the gunpowder and canons on their side to tear the wall around Byzantinum down. It was just a matter of time. Furthermore it is said that the Emperor Mehmed II was a good strategist with creative plans to conquer the city.
(edited 1 month ago)

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