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A level options for econ.

I want to do economics as a degree in a pretty good uni in the future, and i was wondering what options would be better/ recommended. My main options for my a levels are econ, maths and business, and econ, maths and physics. I like maths and physics and im pretty good at them, but my family are pessimistic as physics is hard and dont want me flunking it and not even being an applicant - so they want me to do the first option. However, physics is one of my fav subjects and its really interesting to me, i also can see it makes me a more favourable candidate for the better unis as it shows more analytical thinking rather than business ( which ive been told is disliked by unis). So, do i play it safe and go for what i think is a worse choice but nearly guarantee a good grade, or should i risk it. Thanks for the time.
Original post by salami.
I want to do economics as a degree in a pretty good uni in the future, and i was wondering what options would be better/ recommended. My main options for my a levels are econ, maths and business, and econ, maths and physics. I like maths and physics and im pretty good at them, but my family are pessimistic as physics is hard and dont want me flunking it and not even being an applicant - so they want me to do the first option. However, physics is one of my fav subjects and its really interesting to me, i also can see it makes me a more favourable candidate for the better unis as it shows more analytical thinking rather than business ( which ive been told is disliked by unis). So, do i play it safe and go for what i think is a worse choice but nearly guarantee a good grade, or should i risk it. Thanks for the time.

Hi there,

I'm a 4th year student on an integrated masters in Mathematics & Statistics. I would recommend looking at some different Economics degrees on university websites. At Lancaster to do an economics degree currently the requirements are AAB with at least a B in A-Level mathematics.

Personally, I would choose subjects you enjoy because you will be more motivated to revise them and there is a possibility you could change your mind from wanting do an economics degree. While I can't speak for other universities, I know Lancaster would not discriminate against you doing a business A-Level.

Please feel free to ask me any questions.

Amy (Lancaster University Ambassador) 🙂
Reply 2
Original post by Lancaster Student Ambassador
Hi there,

I'm a 4th year student on an integrated masters in Mathematics & Statistics. I would recommend looking at some different Economics degrees on university websites. At Lancaster to do an economics degree currently the requirements are AAB with at least a B in A-Level mathematics.

Personally, I would choose subjects you enjoy because you will be more motivated to revise them and there is a possibility you could change your mind from wanting do an economics degree. While I can't speak for other universities, I know Lancaster would not discriminate against you doing a business A-Level.

Please feel free to ask me any questions.

Amy (Lancaster University Ambassador) 🙂

Thank you for the response,
Would you think that physics, being the harder subject to my knowledge, is worth the risk in terms of it being a more competitive applicant, but that's assuming that physics would make you a more favourable applicant.
As I just feel that the transferrable skills are better for physics in terms of analytical thinking and helping with the quantitative side of economics. However, I cant really seem to shake the doubts my family gives me of it being unnecessarily hard, especially for a subject that isn't mandated by universities.
Please let me know your thoughts.
Original post by salami.
I want to do economics as a degree in a pretty good uni in the future, and i was wondering what options would be better/ recommended. My main options for my a levels are econ, maths and business, and econ, maths and physics. I like maths and physics and im pretty good at them, but my family are pessimistic as physics is hard and dont want me flunking it and not even being an applicant - so they want me to do the first option. However, physics is one of my fav subjects and its really interesting to me, i also can see it makes me a more favourable candidate for the better unis as it shows more analytical thinking rather than business ( which ive been told is disliked by unis). So, do i play it safe and go for what i think is a worse choice but nearly guarantee a good grade, or should i risk it. Thanks for the time.

I think all a-levels are difficult in their own way - so if you're opting for an a level that you are more likely to want to study for, then that's better. Even though physics can be a demanding subject, since it's one of your favourite subjects then you're likely to work harder for it and in the end do well.
Original post by salami.
Thank you for the response,
Would you think that physics, being the harder subject to my knowledge, is worth the risk in terms of it being a more competitive applicant, but that's assuming that physics would make you a more favourable applicant.
As I just feel that the transferrable skills are better for physics in terms of analytical thinking and helping with the quantitative side of economics. However, I cant really seem to shake the doubts my family gives me of it being unnecessarily hard, especially for a subject that isn't mandated by universities.
Please let me know your thoughts.

Hi again,

I think it is hard to say it would be a harder subject as personally I would have struggled with business more than physics probably as I was never great at written answers whereas working with equations was a lot easier. I don't think it would make you a more competitive applicant for most universities as they are more concerned with you meeting the grade requirements rather than what subjects you have achieved them in. I do agree the skills may be more comparable but you will learn them at university regardless so it shouldn't be too much of a worry.

Overall, it is your choice and not your family's. You may end up loving one of your A-Levels so much you decide to do a different degree entirely. I know I haven't gave you a very definitive answer but I would advise to do whatever you can see yourself enjoying more.

Amy (Lancaster Student Ambassador) 🙂
Reply 5
Original post by Lancaster Student Ambassador
Hi again,

I think it is hard to say it would be a harder subject as personally I would have struggled with business more than physics probably as I was never great at written answers whereas working with equations was a lot easier. I don't think it would make you a more competitive applicant for most universities as they are more concerned with you meeting the grade requirements rather than what subjects you have achieved them in. I do agree the skills may be more comparable but you will learn them at university regardless so it shouldn't be too much of a worry.

Overall, it is your choice and not your family's. You may end up loving one of your A-Levels so much you decide to do a different degree entirely. I know I haven't gave you a very definitive answer but I would advise to do whatever you can see yourself enjoying more.

Amy (Lancaster Student Ambassador) 🙂

Okay thank you for the advice. :smile:
Original post by salami.
I want to do economics as a degree in a pretty good uni in the future, and i was wondering what options would be better/ recommended. My main options for my a levels are econ, maths and business, and econ, maths and physics. I like maths and physics and im pretty good at them, but my family are pessimistic as physics is hard and dont want me flunking it and not even being an applicant - so they want me to do the first option. However, physics is one of my fav subjects and its really interesting to me, i also can see it makes me a more favourable candidate for the better unis as it shows more analytical thinking rather than business ( which ive been told is disliked by unis). So, do i play it safe and go for what i think is a worse choice but nearly guarantee a good grade, or should i risk it. Thanks for the time.
have a look at the questions, if you don't find 100% passion, don't do it. if you do, revise and revise. you will do GREAT!
Reply 7
Original post by salami.
I want to do economics as a degree in a pretty good uni in the future, and i was wondering what options would be better/ recommended. My main options for my a levels are econ, maths and business, and econ, maths and physics. I like maths and physics and im pretty good at them, but my family are pessimistic as physics is hard and dont want me flunking it and not even being an aptplicant - so they want me to do the first option. However, physics is one of my fav subjects and its really interesting to me, i also can see it makes me a more favourable candidate for the better unis as it shows more analytical thinking rather than business ( which ive been told is disliked by unis). So, do i play it safe and go for what i think is a worse choice but nearly guarantee a good grade, or should i risk it. Thanks for the time.
Hi,
I'm currently in Y12 and am taking: Maths, Further Maths, Physics and Economics, and would like to study Economics at degree.

The first thing I'd look out for is that most very competitive universities that offer economics much prefer you to have taken further maths (especially Cambridge, if you are thinking of applying to oxbridge). Some schools don't offer the course, but in this case there are things you can do to learn some of it yourself!
Here is some information, if you think you'd be interested in doing As/A level further:
https://amsp.org.uk

As for your other subjects - personally, I wouldn't take business. This is because it isn't that respected of an A-Level, and I feel you will pick up enough important concepts from economics. Physics, so far, I have not found too hard (apparently it gets worse in A2...) but I think if you are doing okay at GCSE it will be fine! Especially if you really enjoy the subject, I think it would be worth it. Although I do wonder sometimes if I'd have preferred to be taking history, or an essay based subject instead of doing so much maths!

As a side not: Economics at A-level really does not involve much maths, so it's only really physics that would be maths!

A positive to choosing physics would be that if you do change your mind about economics, you could always go down the physics/science route (this is what I considered when picking), whereas with business I think your options would be limited.

Hope this helps and I'm happy to answer any questions!
(edited 2 months ago)

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