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Becoming a Solicitor, non-law degree and BBD

Hello all,
I'm currently in the 2nd year of a music degree but I've realised I want to become a solicitor. I got BBD at A Level (law, drama and music respectively) but I'm willing to take a year to resit and change the D to an A. What would be the quickest and most realistic route for me to become a practicing solicitor?
Hello all,
I'm currently in the 2nd year of a music degree but I've realised I want to become a solicitor. I got BBD at A Level (law, drama and music respectively) but I'm willing to take a year to resit and change the D to an A. What would be the quickest and most realistic route for me to become a practicing solicitor?

Hi @egna

I would recommend finishing your music degree and then doing a law conversion. A Law conversion is a one year course that gets you to the equivalent of having done a 3 year law undergrad degree (of course, it does not cover everything but it covers what is deemed to be necessary to begin training in the profession). Once you have done this course then you would do your Solicitors training course or SQE course which prepares you for the SQE exams. Once these exams have been passed you need to do 2 years qualifying work experience in a firm and then you will be fully qualified!

I don't think your A level grades will necessarily hold you back but equally if it is not too much work to change the 'D' grade it would be safer moving forward. Having said this, there is often not much focus on A Levels and more focus on undergrad qualification (for example, to do the conversion you just need a 2:2 in your degree). Basically, some firms will mind and some firms won't but it will not stop you qualifying in the long run and once you have qualified you are good to go!

I hope this helps and good luck 🙂

Sophie
Reply 2
Original post by UniofLaw Student
Hi @egna

I would recommend finishing your music degree and then doing a law conversion. A Law conversion is a one year course that gets you to the equivalent of having done a 3 year law undergrad degree (of course, it does not cover everything but it covers what is deemed to be necessary to begin training in the profession). Once you have done this course then you would do your Solicitors training course or SQE course which prepares you for the SQE exams. Once these exams have been passed you need to do 2 years qualifying work experience in a firm and then you will be fully qualified!

I don't think your A level grades will necessarily hold you back but equally if it is not too much work to change the 'D' grade it would be safer moving forward. Having said this, there is often not much focus on A Levels and more focus on undergrad qualification (for example, to do the conversion you just need a 2:2 in your degree). Basically, some firms will mind and some firms won't but it will not stop you qualifying in the long run and once you have qualified you are good to go!

I hope this helps and good luck 🙂

Sophie

Thanks for the response Sophie. Do you know how I would go about finding a firm to pay for the conversion and qualifying exams? And how competitive it is to apply for the qualifying work experience? Or how likely this is with my grades?
Thanks for the response Sophie. Do you know how I would go about finding a firm to pay for the conversion and qualifying exams? And how competitive it is to apply for the qualifying work experience? Or how likely this is with my grades?

Hi @egna,

Sorry for my delay in response! I would recommend researching areas of law that you think you will be interested in and then researching firms that conduct that work in an area you wish to live geographically. Once you have done this, then you will be able to follow their process for training contracts (if they offer them) through their independent websites and begin the process from there. Qualifying work experience is a big umbrella term for lots of different work, so can involve being employed as a paralegal etc. alongside other things. Therefore, there is no real answer has to how competitive it is but you will have to ascertain what the best method of going about completing this aspect of qualification is for you. 🙂

Sophie

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