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Is a duel honours degree too broad?

I'm considering a dual hons at Uni of Sheffield for econ+math, but I've heard that employers usually prefer those with a single hons as it's more specific and specialised but I'm not sure how true this statement is, any advice?
Original post by Manobal
I'm considering a dual hons at Uni of Sheffield for econ+math, but I've heard that employers usually prefer those with a single hons as it's more specific and specialised but I'm not sure how true this statement is, any advice?


It's not true. A dual honours is as equally valid as a single honous degree. For most employers the degree is a tick in a box and the subject often doesn't matter. Employers are looking for what you will bring to the job.
Original post by Manobal
I'm considering a dual hons at Uni of Sheffield for econ+math, but I've heard that employers usually prefer those with a single hons as it's more specific and specialised but I'm not sure how true this statement is, any advice?


The above poster is correct in so far as most employers don't want a specific degree, they want evidence of degree level educational ability and skills.

However, if you are thinking of going into a career where the employer is degree specific, or on to a more specialist Masters then you need to be careful with joint degrees. If you do two parts that are complementary in the employers eyes, and they can use both parts, like Maths and Economics, then that's fine. The problem can arise when you do two parts that are not complimentary in the eyes of the employer, like Maths and History. If an employer is hiring on the basis of mathematical ability, you've almost certainly only got about half the evidence of a full Maths degree holder.

Maths and Economics is a sound joint degree though.
Original post by Manobal
I'm considering a dual hons at Uni of Sheffield for econ+math, but I've heard that employers usually prefer those with a single hons as it's more specific and specialised but I'm not sure how true this statement is, any advice?
As the above poster outlines well, maths and economics are very complimentary. I can't really think of a single role that would prefer a straight economics graduate over a maths and economics graduate (all else equal) - even economics graduate jobs and positions on economics master's courses students to have a maths with economics.

And how complimentary they are is generally bi-directional, which is again very helpful. The economics bit can be very helpful for quantitative students looking to go into finance/business roles. And having strong quantitative skills is very very important for most economics/finance roles, if you wish to go down that path.
(edited 1 month ago)

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