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"Traditional" subjects for acceptance to uni??? watch

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    Ok, so I'm about to apply to various sixth form colleges but I'm not sure what I want to study for 'A' level. I would like to study about 7 different subjects, but obviously that's not gonna happen! Anyway, does anyone know whether most universities are against more "not traditional" subjects (I'm thinking law and psychology) as opposed to "traditional" ones (I'm thinking: English Literature, French, History, Biology, Chemistry). I think I'll probably apply to do law, psychology, french and english literature because I'm thinking about maybe doing either law or psychology at uni, but I also want to leave my options open in case I change my mind. I'm just worried that some universities would prefer me to not do law and psychology, but one or the other (or neither!) Anyway, any advice on what type of subjects universities tend to prefer would be greatly appreciate. Thanks in advance!
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    All I can advise you to do is to choose the subjects you thinkk you'd enjoy the most and do the best in. Universities don't discriminate against what some have criticised as "soft options" such as psychology (which I do and it's definately more complicated than it appears lol) which will eventually lead you to choosing a favourite degree subject. When I was choosing my A levels I didn't really know what I was going to do at university, until it actually came to chossing a degree subject this year - you could change your mind too. So I say just go with what you think you'd be happiest with for now
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    (Original post by SugarPlum)
    Ok, so I'm about to apply to various sixth form colleges but I'm not sure what I want to study for 'A' level. I would like to study about 7 different subjects, but obviously that's not gonna happen! Anyway, does anyone know whether most universities are against more "not traditional" subjects (I'm thinking law and psychology) as opposed to "traditional" ones (I'm thinking: English Literature, French, History, Biology, Chemistry). I think I'll probably apply to do law, psychology, french and english literature because I'm thinking about maybe doing either law or psychology at uni, but I also want to leave my options open in case I change my mind. I'm just worried that some universities would prefer me to not do law and psychology, but one or the other (or neither!) Anyway, any advice on what type of subjects universities tend to prefer would be greatly appreciate. Thanks in advance!
    Well i was in your predicament, and i kind of chose the safer option. I am applying Post Alevel to uni. I did Alevels in History,Economics,French,Philoso phy,English Lit and an AS in Psychology.i looked over the specifications for most of the subjects, i suggest you do that, and then see what you find appealing. I only did Psychoology to A/S because out of the three modules; only one was interesting (social influence unit)....Good Luck x
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    oh btw---when i was your age i thought that i wanted to do Law. But in the end, my love of History won. I have applied to do History. Try not to think to far into the future, just think about what you enjoy! x
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    (Original post by aliel)
    Well i was in your predicament, and i kind of chose the safer option. I am applying Post Alevel to uni. I did Alevels in History,Economics,French,Philoso phy,English Lit and an AS in Psychology.i looked over the specifications for most of the subjects, i suggest you do that, and then see what you find appealing. I only did Psychoology to A/S because out of the three modules; only one was interesting (social influence unit)....Good Luck x
    Aliel- you did five A levels and ANOTHER AS level?! How did you find it? Was it really hard work? Or did you take longer than the usual 2 year course? It would be helpful if I could do an AS in either law or psychology, as well as other A levels because the main reason I'm doing law and psych. (because I could still do a degree in them without the A level in them) is to check they entail what I anticipate they will. If I could do 4/5 traditional A levels and then either law or psychology as an AS it would be better. I dunno, I didn't know it was an option...?
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    Does no-one have any more advice? :confused:
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    (Original post by SugarPlum)
    Does no-one have any more advice? :confused:
    Yes. Don't study Law. Full stop. And you'll need more than just psychology A Level if you want to read it at Univeristy - you'd need 2 more sciences.
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    (Original post by Tek)
    Yes. Don't study Law. Full stop. And you'll need more than just psychology A Level if you want to read it at Univeristy - you'd need 2 more sciences.
    Thank you. Do you know whether psychology is considered as a Science or not? The only reason I considered studying law was to see what it entails- I don't even need it if I decided to study it at uni. Trouble is, if I don't know what it's like now then how will I know in 2 years time if I haven't studied it? Same with psychology. I was under the impression I only needed a minimum of one Science for entry to a psych. degree- but would that only get me into a crappy course? Thank you for your help- I do appreciate it.
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    (Original post by SugarPlum)
    Thank you. Do you know whether psychology is considered as a Science or not? The only reason I considered studying law was to see what it entails- I don't even need it if I decided to study it at uni. Trouble is, if I don't know what it's like now then how will I know in 2 years time if I haven't studied it? Same with psychology. I was under the impression I only needed a minimum of one Science for entry to a psych. degree- but would that only get me into a crappy course? Thank you for your help- I do appreciate it.
    Most Unis would prefer 2 or 3 sciences (biology and chemistry) for a psychology degree.
    If you studied Law at A Level then that would severely limit your choices of institutions later on: all the top Unis discourage studying Law at school.
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    Psychology = social science, though unis differ on whether to class social sciences as sciences or arts.

    And why do unis discourage doing Law A-Level before a Law degree? What's so bad about it, I would have thought it would make the first year a relative breeze?
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    (Original post by ZJuwelH)
    Psychology = social science, though unis differ on whether to class social sciences as sciences or arts.

    And why do unis discourage doing Law A-Level before a Law degree? What's so bad about it, I would have thought it would make the first year a relative breeze?
    They prefer you to study it from scratch under their supervision. Trust me, studying Law A Level with a view to doing it at Uni is the biggest mistake you could ever make (short of bothering to apply to Oxbridge with, say, Accounting, Theatre Studies and Film Studies to read Law).
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    (Original post by Tek)
    They prefer you to study it from scratch under their supervision. Trust me, studying Law A Level with a view to doing it at Uni is the biggest mistake you could ever make (short of bothering to apply to Oxbridge with, say, Accounting, Theatre Studies and Film Studies to read Law).
    I agree. Very few people who study law at university come from having a law a level - in fact, it is probably to your disadvantage as universities prefer english, history, etc as better foundations for law.
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    (Original post by Tek)
    Most Unis would prefer 2 or 3 sciences (biology and chemistry) for a psychology degree.
    If you studied Law at A Level then that would severely limit your choices of institutions later on: all the top Unis discourage studying Law at school.
    Yes, I've heard this too actually. I just didn't know how much it applied to reality. I guess studying law is off the list then. That's good- my choices are being narrowed down. If unis prefer two or three sciences, then I might be better off not aiming for psychology and doing eng lit and history for law. I'm better at and enjoy more english-y subjects than science-y ones. Psychology interests me, but no other science-y things, so I may be better off concentrating on the english-side of things rather than the science side. It seems as though if I were to mix the two, I would have broadened my choices too much. Ok, thanks for your help.
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    (Original post by Adhsur)
    I agree. Very few people who study law at university come from having a law a level - in fact, it is probably to your disadvantage as universities prefer english, history, etc as better foundations for law.
    Adhsur your rep continues to astound me!! 6 Gems!!?!
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    (Original post by Tek)
    They prefer you to study it from scratch under their supervision. Trust me, studying Law A Level with a view to doing it at Uni is the biggest mistake you could ever make (short of bothering to apply to Oxbridge with, say, Accounting, Theatre Studies and Film Studies to read Law).
    Doesn't bode well for my mate oops. Doh one of my A-Levels is Accounting, and I'm a Cambridge applicant! Lucky my other three are decent ones...
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    (Original post by Tek)
    Adhsur your rep continues to astound me!! 6 Gems!!?!
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    Ok, so, here's what I'm thinking of applying for: English literature, History, French and possibly psychology- not to aim for doing this at a degree level, but because the subject still interests me, and could prove to be a useful 'A' level to have nonetheless. This does close my options for studying psychology at uni, but I definitely don't want to do even two sciences which would be necessary for this. It leaves me able to do law, but also leaves my options open for quite a few other "English-y" subjects if I decide I dislike law. One question though- I don't think I'd want to study law at university having never studied it before. However, if I wanted to study it at university, most would prefer me starting from scratch. How, then, do I find out exactly what it's like to study law, without ever having actually studied it??? Arrrgggg!!!!! :confused: How realistic is it to do four 'A' levels and one AS? Would it be stupid to do those four A levels and an additional AS in law? Is it just majorly gifted people that do this, or is it an achievable possibility?
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    (Original post by SugarPlum)
    Ok, so, here's what I'm thinking of applying for: English literature, History, French and possibly psychology- not to aim for doing this at a degree level, but because the subject still interests me, and could prove to be a useful 'A' level to have nonetheless. This does close my options for studying psychology at uni, but I definitely don't want to do even two sciences which would be necessary for this. It leaves me able to do law, but also leaves my options open for quite a few other "English-y" subjects if I decide I dislike law. One question though- I don't think I'd want to study law at university having never studied it before. However, if I wanted to study it at university, most would prefer me starting from scratc. How, then, do I find out exactly what it's like to study law, without ever having actually studies it??? Arrrgggg!!!!! :confused: How realistic is it to do four 'A' levels and one AS? Would it be stupid to do those four A levels and an additional AS in law? Is it just majorly gifted people that do this, or is it an achievable possibility?
    I am currently doing 4 A2s and 1 extra AS. It is not impossible and you'll find it's quite common It really depends if you think you are good enough to do it...your GCSE results will be a good judge of that.

    As for doing psychology at uni, I was pretty sure you didn't need a science at A level to study it. But I guess that depends on teh university.

    I think your subject choices are great!!! Psychology will make it a bit more relaxing for you, as I presume the other subjects will be more taxing. Good luck!

    P.S If you want to do law with a bit of background knowledge, I suggest you do what I did and buy a book on it (I bought an AS book). It will also give you some idea as to whether you want to do the subject - it certainly put me off as it looked so dull! If you decide it really is the subject for you later on, you'll go in with a good foundation for doing teh course.
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    Four and a half A-Levels are definitely doable, I'm doing it so many people should be able to! I'm sure many open days will give you a better idea of Law at university. Though AS Law wouldn't be bad either.
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    (Original post by SugarPlum)
    Ok, so, here's what I'm thinking of applying for: English literature, History, French and possibly psychology- not to aim for doing this at a degree level, but because the subject still interests me, and could prove to be a useful 'A' level to have nonetheless. This does close my options for studying psychology at uni, but I definitely don't want to do even two sciences which would be necessary for this. It leaves me able to do law, but also leaves my options open for quite a few other "English-y" subjects if I decide I dislike law. One question though- I don't think I'd want to study law at university having never studied it before. However, if I wanted to study it at university, most would prefer me starting from scratch. How, then, do I find out exactly what it's like to study law, without ever having actually studied it??? Arrrgggg!!!!! :confused: How realistic is it to do four 'A' levels and one AS? Would it be stupid to do those four A levels and an additional AS in law? Is it just majorly gifted people that do this, or is it an achievable possibility?
    I'm doing 5 full A Levels and it's not that bad.
 
 
 
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