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    What types of intermolecular force is (are) common to a) Xe and methanol (CH3OH), b) CH3OH and acetonitrile (CH3CN), c) NH3 and HF?

    XE-CH3OH

    London-molecule isn't non polar so can't be
    Dipole-Dipole-moleclue is polar so dipole-dipole
    Hydrogen-no N, O, F or C on the left so can't be
    Ionic- Can't be because this isnt between a metal and nonmetal


    CH3OH-CH3CN

    London-the EN is very close i want to say this is a london
    Dipole-Dipole-EN come close , the math would say its a close polar molecule so i'd say Dipole-Dipole
    Hydrogen-I see H bonded to O and C but not sure if i'm making a mistake here to label this a hydrogen bond
    Ionic- Can't be because this isn't between a metal and nonmetal



    NH3-HF

    London-isn't polar so can't be
    Dipole-Dipole-is polar so does have this but hydrogen since of very high polarity
    Hydrogen- H is bonded to an N and F so i'd assume this is a hydrogen bond
    Ionic- Can't be because this isn't between a metal and nonmetal



    not exactly sure if the question was asking which do they all have in common jointly, if it was I would say Dipole-Dipole from what i wrote above. Please correct any flaws with my reasoning!
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    the next question is

    Which member of the following pairs has the stronger intermolecular dispersion forces

    a) Br2 or O2


    b) CH3CH2SH or CH3CH2CH2CH2SH


    c) CH3CH2CH2CL or (CH3)2 CHCL


    I'm a bit confused on the wording of the question. Is it asking Molecule A vs Molecule B which has the stronger forces for each letter?
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    (Original post by chstudent)
    What types of intermolecular force is (are) common to a) Xe and methanol (CH3OH), b) CH3OH and acetonitrile (CH3CN), c) NH3 and HF?

    XE-CH3OH

    London-molecule isn't non polar so can't be - wrong
    Dipole-Dipole-moleclue is polar so dipole-dipole
    Hydrogen-no N, O, F or C on the left so can't be
    Ionic- Can't be because this isnt between a metal and nonmetal


    CH3OH-CH3CN

    London-the EN is very close i want to say this is a london
    Dipole-Dipole-EN come close , the math would say its a close polar molecule so i'd say Dipole-Dipole
    Hydrogen-I see H bonded to O and C but not sure if i'm making a mistake here to label this a hydrogen bond
    Ionic- Can't be because this isn't between a metal and nonmetal



    NH3-HF

    London-isn't polar so can't be
    Dipole-Dipole-is polar so does have this but hydrogen since of very high polarity
    Hydrogen- H is bonded to an N and F so i'd assume this is a hydrogen bond
    Ionic- Can't be because this isn't between a metal and nonmetal



    not exactly sure if the question was asking which do they all have in common jointly, if it was I would say Dipole-Dipole from what i wrote above. Please correct any flaws with my reasoning!

    Van der Waals forces are induced dipole-dipole interactions and exist between ALL particles.
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    (Original post by chstudent)
    the next question is

    Which member of the following pairs has the stronger intermolecular dispersion forces

    a) Br2 or O2


    b) CH3CH2SH or CH3CH2CH2CH2SH


    c) CH3CH2CH2CL or (CH3)2 CHCL


    I'm a bit confused on the wording of the question. Is it asking Molecule A vs Molecule B which has the stronger forces for each letter?
    The question is asking you to compare oxygen and bromine and say which has the greater dispersion forces.

    THEN compare the next pair...

    'Dispersion' is another way of describing Van der Waals forces. These are primarily related to the relative masses of the particles involved. If the masses are the same they are fine-tuned by the shape - more branching = weaker forces.
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    (Original post by charco)
    Van der Waals forces are induced dipole-dipole interactions and exist between ALL particles.
    So that means all of the examples would contain london dispersion forces?
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    (Original post by chstudent)
    So that means all of the examples would contain london dispersion forces?
    yes
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    XE-CH3OH

    London-molecule isn't non polar so can't be - wrong (I'm confused on why this is wrong)
    Dipole-Dipole-moleclue is polar so dipole-dipole
    Hydrogen-no N, O, F or C on the left so can't be
    Ionic- Can't be because this isnt between a metal and nonmetal
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    (Original post by chstudent)
    XE-CH3OH

    London-molecule isn't non polar so can't be - wrong (I'm confused on why this is wrong)
    Dipole-Dipole-moleclue is polar so dipole-dipole
    Hydrogen-no N, O, F or C on the left so can't be
    Ionic- Can't be because this isnt between a metal and nonmetal
    London forces don't require any dipole - just electrons
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    (Original post by chstudent)
    the next question is

    Which member of the following pairs has the stronger intermolecular dispersion forces

    a) Br2 159.8gmol or O2 32gmol

    therefore Br2 has stronger intermolecular dispersion forces



    b) CH3CH2SH 62.15gmol or CH3CH2CH2CH2SH 90.21gmol

    therefore CH3CH2CH2CH2SH has stronger intermolecular dispersion forces



    c) CH3CH2CH2CL 78.55 or (CH3)2 CHCL 78.55

    both have the same weight but i think CH3CH2CH2CL is stronger because it has less branches in the structure?
    hey please double check my answers
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    Yeah - they're all good :yy:
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    (Original post by chstudent)
    What types of intermolecular force is (are) common to a) Xe and methanol (CH3OH), b) CH3OH and acetonitrile (CH3CN), c) NH3 and HF?

    XE-CH3OH

    London-seems like it can be this as well?
    Dipole-Dipole-moleclue is polar so dipole-dipole
    Hydrogen-no N, O, F or C on the left so can't be
    Ionic- Can't be because this isnt between a metal and nonmetal


    CH3OH-CH3CN

    London-the EN is very close i want to say this is a london
    Dipole-Dipole-EN come close , the math would say its a close polar molecule so i'd say Dipole-Dipole
    Hydrogen-I see H bonded to O and C but not sure if i'm making a mistake here to label this a hydrogen bond
    Ionic- Can't be because this isn't between a metal and nonmetal



    NH3-HF

    London-isn't polar so can't be
    Dipole-Dipole-is polar so does have this but hydrogen since of very high polarity
    Hydrogen- H is bonded to an N and F so i'd assume this is a hydrogen bond
    Ionic- Can't be because this isn't between a metal and nonmetal



    not exactly sure if the question was asking which do they all have in common jointly, if it was I would say Dipole-Dipole from what i wrote above. Please correct any flaws with my reasoning!
    i want to check over this question again as well. I reread the question and it seems to hint that there could be more than one force for each question. When i first went to solve i was just looking for one so i'm checking to see if i missed any?
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    Xe-CH3OH = London only
    CH3OH-CH3CN = London + Dipole/Dipole
    NH3-HF = London + Hydrogen bonding

 
 
 
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