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    (Original post by belis)
    That is true. However what proportion of nurses will go into those specialist roles? Not that many. And even if you are going to become a nurse practitioner/consultant/specialist etc you look at fair few years in the staff nurse role first.

    community nurses, pratice nurses aswell can do prescribing courses, a district nurse at my weight loss group, has just finished a prescribers course, and is a band 6
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    this should get interesting....chocolate biscuits anyone?

    *waits for nazi med student*
    I know. I bet I just cursed my whole future career with that one post
    "cup of teeeeea"
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    (Original post by Perfect_Gent)
    I'm a student nurse. I've just had an educational assesment and they said I could have been a doctor, the trouble is I haven't got the qualifications just the ability. Never mind though, it's a very rewarding career just nowhere near as much money.
    You could do a post-graduate degrre after you finish nursing? Only a suggestion- if you have an ability and desire to become a medic maybe its worth trying?
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    (Original post by sprite_fright)
    I know. I bet I just cursed my whole future career with that one post
    "cup of teeeeea"

    nah you just cursed your time on tsr with that post..lol

    cup of tea would be nice but don't forget the biscuits nurse! oh and only 3 sugars..got to watch my sugar levels and all :tongue:

    Lol i love the saying the only thing a nurse can prescribe is a hot water bottle, cup of tea and a smile, 3 lifesavers!
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    (Original post by bottfly7)
    Yes they can. Look up Nurse Practitioner. Sort of like a GP, except they get paid 4 times less.

    This is one of the slip ups to the question "Why do you want to be a doctor and not a nurse?". Other comon misconceptions are:

    1. Nurses CAN prescribe.
    2. Nurses DO lead teams- just look at Walk-in centres

    Plus many more.
    Ah bit this required the nurses to do specialist training to do these whereas you just need to so your degree in medicine. There is also restrictions to them as well
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    hmm, i would say..and this is the reverse of the response i gave in my nursing interview (when asked why i wasn't going into medicine, with my a-levels and experience)

    nursing = responsibility
    nursing = problem solving
    nursing = understanding of the body, pharmacology, clinical issues (although you're right the average staff nurse would not know as much as a nurse prac)...but its the areas in which these nurses have responsibility, HOW they problem solve and what they problem solve, maybe try and get some experience for a few hours or a day or so with a nursing team, and compare this to your medical WE, and this may help you give a better answer?
    Please don't take offense from this post.

    I have done nursing WE and medical WE

    nursing - primarily giving out medication, talking to patients about how they feel, reporting back to drs
    medical - taking on board nursing reports and actually solving the problems, rather than being told them

    Not sure how I would translate this into a valid arguement as to why I would rather be a dr though
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    (Original post by lekky)
    Please don't take offense from this post.

    I have done nursing WE and medical WE

    nursing - primarily giving out medication, talking to patients about how they feel, reporting back to drs
    medical - taking on board nursing reports and actually solving the problems, rather than being told them

    Not sure how I would translate this into a valid arguement as to why I would rather be a dr though
    what area of nursing did you get experience in? a lot of it is reporting back observations, a lot..lots and lots...lol but also care planning, the problem solving is here, ie what would you do with a dehydrated patient, one who has a developing pressure sore, constipated...when would you decide to do a fluid balance chart, increase observations, know what to report and why, WHY are you giving out this medication, how can we get this patient to eat, be mobile..obviously this is input from the MDT too, but..just a few examples of problem solving nurses do, we don't do problem based/evidence based degrees for no reason!
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    what area of nursing did you get experience in? a lot of it is reporting back observations, a lot..lots and lots...lol but also care planning, the problem solving is here, ie what would you do with a dehydrated patient, one who has a developing pressure sore, constipated...when would you decide to do a fluid balance chart, increase observations, know what to report and why, WHY are you giving out this medication, how can we get this patient to eat, be mobile..obviously this is input from the MDT too, but..just a few examples of problem solving nurses do, we don't do problem based/evidence based degrees for no reason!
    surgical ward. I shall go and have a ponder :yes:
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    what area of nursing did you get experience in? a lot of it is reporting back observations, a lot..lots and lots...lol but also care planning, the problem solving is here, ie what would you do with a dehydrated patient, one who has a developing pressure sore, constipated...when would you decide to do a fluid balance chart, increase observations, know what to report and why, WHY are you giving out this medication, how can we get this patient to eat, be mobile..obviously this is input from the MDT too, but..just a few examples of problem solving nurses do, we don't do problem based/evidence based degrees for no reason!
    I think you have to be pretty skillful to be a nurse- my grandmother, who was a doctor often said that nurse's work is neither easier nor less important than doctor's. But I would prefer to be a doctor, because I'm interested in diseases and the way they affect people, plus there is the matter of pay :p:
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    (Original post by lekky)
    surgical ward. I shall go and have a ponder :yes:

    hehe im not asking you to answer the questions, more contemplate what nurses face, seems trivial i know..and its the basic care doctors don't always think about, a doctor has never asked myself or my mentor whether a patient is developing a pressure sore, and what the care plan is- unless we have a concern and tell him/her. Surgical wards are a lottttt of giving out medication, and basic care like personal hygiene, reassurance, health promotion..prepping etc, not my cup of tea nursing wise, personally i want to be out there with the wound/community care, i'd love to be a tissue viability nurse or maybe something in critical care (but need to wait till 2nd year/3rd year for that) thing is there are so many areas nurses work in and all of their roles differ and change...for example all a nurse in an outpatients oncology centre, would be different to an ITU nurse
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    (Original post by AutVinceriAutMori)
    I think you have to be pretty skillful to be a nurse- my grandmother, who was a doctor often said that nurse's work is neither easier nor less important than doctor's. But I would prefer to be a doctor, because I'm interested in diseases and the way they affect people, plus there is the matter of pay :p:

    lol the pay is a bonus, its not something ive ever considered, i guess nursing is more flexible too, for raising a family, seems premature to consider i know, but..it is a lot more flexible than in medicine, plus when i did my medicine work experience, i valued the patient contact a lot more in nursing, nothing is more satisfying than walking your bay with your sister, and all the patients you've cared for with your mentor, or a HCA are satisfied, well..etc..and you know why they're there, what they're here for, what their plan of action is..and they're all happy and satisfied as you'd spent 2-3 days caring for them, nothing beats it, I'd miss it if i was a doctor..i'd miss sitting at the end of my bay chatting to a patient whilst doing paperwork etc Im interested in diseases too, and how they affect the body- but enjoy the nursing interventions into these illnesses much more!
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    lol the pay is a bonus, its not something ive ever considered, i guess nursing is more flexible too, for raising a family, seems premature to consider i know, but..it is a lot more flexible than in medicine, plus when i did my medicine work experience, i valued the patient contact a lot more in nursing, nothing is more satisfying than walking your bay with your sister, and all the patients you've cared for with your mentor, or a HCA are satisfied, well..etc..and you know why they're there, what they're here for, what their plan of action is..and they're all happy and satisfied as you'd spent 2-3 days caring for them, nothing beats it, I'd miss it if i was a doctor..i'd miss sitting at the end of my bay chatting to a patient whilst doing paperwork etc Im interested in diseases too, and how they affect the body- but enjoy the nursing interventions into these illnesses much more!
    I guess its a good thing that you love your job, its an important factor . Quite a few of my friends are going to be nurses
    I have a look at a plaster casting operation, where the nurse has effectively plastered man's hand, and she turned out to be my mum's old friend and collegue :awesome: She and the doctor in charge made a good team, and I think its also important for a doctor to have a good relationship with nurse. If it was up to me, nurses would have been paid more money :p: But if you are a specialist nurse you get paid more, no?
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    Medicine pays better and doesn't have the feminine connotations.
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    (Original post by AutVinceriAutMori)
    I guess its a good thing that you love your job, its an important factor . Quite a few of my friends are going to be nurses
    I have a look at a plaster casting operation, where the nurse has effectively plastered man's hand, and she turned out to be my mum's old friend and collegue :awesome: She and the doctor in charge made a good team, and I think its also important for a doctor to have a good relationship with nurse. If it was up to me, nurses would have been paid more money :p: But if you are a specialist nurse you get paid more, no?

    oh gosh yes, specialists..managment, matrons..practitioners, pratice nurses, all earn a good good wage, it'd be fab if nurses could get paid more, but c'est la vie, i'd do the job whatever the wage as long as i could live on it :dontknow:

    It is important for a good relationship...with anyone, even the cleaners! you do find many doctors don't always get the nurses role and what we do, but i guess at the same time, with the new agendas coming in, many nurses are feeling that way too now, but im hoping when i qualify, and the review is implemented, it'd be clearer and easier in the working enviroment..doubt it tho lol

    and thanks for reminding me why i'm doing it, its hard to remember when you're bogged down with assignments
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    (Original post by hoonosewot)
    I got this question at Newcastle. I just said i wanted a job that incorporated more science and that i wanted the added responsibility and decision making of being the doctor.
    I got that question too! My answer was pretty similar, I warbled on about how I'd like to be on the diagnosis side of things etc etc.
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    ...nothing is more satisfying than walking your bay with your sister, and all the patients you've cared for with your mentor, or a HCA are satisfied, well..etc..and you know why they're there, what they're here for, what their plan of action is..and they're all happy and satisfied as you'd spent 2-3 days caring for them, nothing beats it, I'd miss it if i was a doctor...
    Is it just me or does it sound an awful lot like an usual ward round?
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    oh gosh yes, specialists..managment, matrons..practitioners, pratice nurses, all earn a good good wage, it'd be fab if nurses could get paid more, but c'est la vie, i'd do the job whatever the wage as long as i could live on it :dontknow:

    It is important for a good relationship...with anyone, even the cleaners! you do find many doctors don't always get the nurses role and what we do, but i guess at the same time, with the new agendas coming in, many nurses are feeling that way too now, but im hoping when i qualify, and the review is implemented, it'd be clearer and easier in the working enviroment..doubt it tho lol

    and thanks for reminding me why i'm doing it, its hard to remember when you're bogged down with assignments
    No problem I hope when you finish uni it will be a lot better :yes:
    And I hope that I get a chance to become a doctor :moon:
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    (Original post by belis)
    Is it just me or does it sound an awful lot like an usual ward round?

    nahhh, i stay away from ward rounds, its more that time of day, usually straight after lunch, personal hygiene has been done, drugs round done..and its that mid period, where you sit back, and evaluate what needs to be done that afternoon, and retake control, on placements ive been on the sister will come in, review the bay with the nurse, its a bit like ward round, but more the nursing interventions...but usually that time where you can sit back during a shift and think 'ok jobs have actually been done!', and the action plans are care plan based, its that personal and caring relationship which nurses get the opportunity to build with their patients in much more depth that i'd miss, ofcourse medicine gets that oppiortunity too, but...well..nothing just beats that walk, knowing your patients inside out holistically, and that relationship you have, i missed that on my medical work experience it was just...far too clinical I guess for who I am
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    (Original post by AAAirz)
    Medicine pays better and doesn't have the feminine connotations.
    Ha watch and wait. Watch and wait.
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    (Original post by Sarky)
    Ha watch and wait. Watch and wait.
    Nurses earning more than doctors? I'd eat my own liver. :o:






















    N.B. You can't throw that "Senior ead nurses get 50k vs 30k a junior doctor that just graduated med school." You know that's not fair. Got in there before anyone else. Don't even know why I'm in this thread. Didn't even apply to medicine.
 
 
 
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