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ADHD- How has it affected your education?

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    (Original post by Kindred)
    You ca choose who knows though. I don't tell many people. Anybody I have told though has been fine with it. I've had no negative experiences from telling people. I wouldn't let stigma be the reason you don't get answers.
    yeah true I didn't necessarily mean stigma from my friends or people I know in general I meant if I were to mention it in a situation in order to gain extra help or whatever at work or uni or whatever just the thought they'd be like errr not a real condition but you're right it doesn't matter in the grand scheme of things and it's more important to gain access to any help available than to worry about stigma.
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    (Original post by stefano865)
    Yup uni was impossible for me too.

    I left because it became clear that things just weren't right. I seemed to struggle so much with day to day life for no logical reason.

    In the end the problems built up to such an extent that i started looking for answers.

    Christ was I relieved to have that diagnosis.
    For me it was partiall mh issues and other medical conditions, but ADD and Dyslexia just added to the ammount of effort I needed to put in. I think that on the job and practical types of learning could be better. I was always much better in placement after all.

    Anybody here who thinks they're dumb or lazy or whatever and are just doomed to fail- look outside of clasic academia. There are ways to be successful without needing to read book or write papers.
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    (Original post by Kindred)
    For me it was partiall mh issues and other medical conditions, but ADD and Dyslexia just added to the ammount of effort I needed to put in. I think that on the job and practical types of learning could be better. I was always much better in placement after all.

    Anybody here who thinks they're dumb or lazy or whatever and are just doomed to fail- look outside of clasic academia. There are ways to be successful without needing to read book or write papers.

    Agree.

    The problem for me is regulating my interest. I like reading and writing. But in the past have only done well on topics I'm enthusiastic about. I struggle to muster any motivation for things that don't interest me. By this I mean I'd pretty much have to be forced at gunpoint to write that boring essay to a good standard. I can't help it.
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    (Original post by Little Popcorns)
    yeah true I didn't necessarily mean stigma from my friends or people I know in general I meant if I were to mention it in a situation in order to gain extra help or whatever at work or uni or whatever just the thought they'd be like errr not a real condition but you're right it doesn't matter in the grand scheme of things and it's more important to gain access to any help available than to worry about stigma.
    The way you would get extra help is basically the same as how disabled people get them to put ramps in etc. I don't know what it's called but there is a system for it. They are required to help you within reason and if they treat you negatively because of it you can report them to HR because it's discrimination. Yeah people may see you differently because of it, but tbh they will already be judging you anyway. If anything ADD/ ADHD gives a reason for things they have already noticed.

    At uni it is DSA and student support you talk to and if anybody gives you a hard time you report it. I found at uni that when I had a negative experience with somebody I had far more support from my classmates than I would have thought. They even reported the person.
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    (Original post by Kindred)
    The way you would get extra help is basically the same as how disabled people get them to put ramps in etc. I don't know what it's called but there is a system for it. They are required to help you within reason and if they treat you negatively because of it you can report them to HR because it's discrimination. Yeah people may see you differently because of it, but tbh they will already be judging you anyway. If anything ADD/ ADHD gives a reason for things they have already noticed.

    At uni it is DSA and student support you talk to and if anybody gives you a hard time you report it. I found at uni that when I had a negative experience with somebody I had far more support from my classmates than I would have thought. They even reported the person.
    Yeah I get you

    You're right it is important to get the most out of these things sounds kind of like oh stop milking it but I've learnt that honestly playing these problems down will only come back and bite you in the bum when you don't manage to achieve your potential because you were acting too 'I'm fine' to admit you needed extra support (me)...
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    I was diagnosed with ADHD (inattentive type) at 14/15.

    How has it affected my education? I didn't do too great in GCSEs compared to how I should have done because of concentration issues. However, at A-level even though still unmedicated up to this point (was going through heart tests for something else and they thought Ritalin etc. might interfere) I was able to self teach myself all the subjects, go to which lessons I found interesting and found my own way of coping with concentration issues such as listening to music while studying, tapping my fingers while reading and taking 2 min breaks every 5 mins. Got A*A*A*a*a.

    I am now on Ritalin at masters level (wasn't at undergrad) and the effect on my studying has been great! Linking it with what I learnt when unmedicated means I feel like I can cope with the high intensity of a masters degree and the high level of concentration required.

    I would really advise those who think they have the disorder in adulthood to get it checked out (if it's been prevalent since childhood and mention that at assessment).
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    I was diagnosed ADD aged 16. (never had hyperactivity)

    Before I was diagnosed, I had always been a bright student who would struggle, but because I was clever I was able to coast through primary school and the first 3 years of grammar school.
    Towards the end of 3rd year, I was having problems but they seemed minor, and more like a mental health issue such as depression.

    I really started to struggle, I was trying and trying and seemed to be getting nowhere. I was incredibly artistic and creative, but struggled with remembering things like books, deadlines, when tests were, what homework I had. I always was very middle of the road, I didn't act out and misbehave and teachers said I wasn't trying hard enough, needed to do more work at home etc. when the reality was that I was doing the work, and getting nowhere. Art and English were the only two subjects I seemed to do well in, and my English teacher was brilliant and very accommodating. My attendance at school dropped drastically in 4th and 5th year, my GCSE years. This was because mentally, I felt defeated and awful. I had no self esteem, couldn't understand why I couldn't do things and many teachers called me lazy and didn't understand why I couldn't just do things. Friends seemed to treat me as a joke as I was clumsy and impulsive, which made me 'funny'. I just didn't see the point in going to school, as no matter how hard I tried, I didn't seem to do well and it felt pointless.

    I was in a very low, bad place mentally. The Education Welfare Officer was involved, as was the pastoral support teams, and none of them ever considered ADD or anything other than I was lazy and couldn't be bothered even when I tried to describe that I was struggling. I essentially didn't attend school for months. It took me nearly a year to be referred to CAHMS, and it was only after about 6 weeks of weekly session, my keyworker suggested to my mum about a possible ADD diagnosis after she had spoken to me. At this point, I had incredibly low mood and self esteem, social anxiety as a result of a fear of asking questions or for help because teachers accused me of not paying attention or not concentrating or being distracted - looking back, you can understand why. I was diagnosed, even though the forms sent to the school on my behaviour came back and apparently didn't indicate any sign of any ADD traits, it is actually noted in my diagnosis report that the results from school should pretty much be disregarded as I wasn't in enough for teachers to accurately give a report for me.

    I'm angry at the school, who called me lazy and tried to punish and scare me into attending, instead of realising there was a problem with inattention and a special education need. Because I wasn't hyperactive, and even when I wasn't attending, I was still getting around 60-70% in most mock exams and class tests, they didn't see that as enough of a concern (even though between year 1-3 my marks had all generally been between 75-95%, the drop to 16% in my physics mock was because I wasn't working or bothering to learn the work).

    I went to private school for a year in the end as I sat only one GCSE, my art GCSE. My art teacher was wonderful, and did everything she could to make sure I got my art in and was always very positive and praising of all her students. I went to a tiny private school to redo my GCSE's (my parents are divorced, and dad paid) and by this time I had started medication which made a huge difference, and whilst I didn't have an IEP the school was so small (16 in my whole year group) any problems were quickly picked up. I came out with A*s, As and Bs (and a C in maths).

    It has had a huge impact on my school life, caused me multiple issues and now I'm 20, if I'm off my meds it makes a huge difference and I struggle with concentration, staying on task and doing anything really productive. Diagnosis has made a huge difference as I now know what I struggle with, how I can try and manage it and mentally I am much more confident and happier because if I am struggling, I can ask for help. If I had been diagnosed and not slipped through the net and considered a lazy student who needs to try harder, I wouldn't have had to redo a year. The school I went to for 6th form were brilliant and really on the ball pastorally and for SEN as well.

    I'm currently seeing adult services, and the ones where I am are not good. My consultant has seen me twice in 2 years, even though my meds need to be monitored/checked every 3-6 months, and my consultant also doesn't believe in ADD in adults! so he would rather have me discharged, take me off meds and tell me I'm just lazy and not trying hard enough from my interactions with him anyway. He also doesn't seem to have a great grasp on English (I have nothing against foreign doctors, but I can vividly recall trying to explain to him that my meds seemed to not be working as well and I was struggling with concentration and to focus more than usual, which he seemed to struggle to understand) which doesn't help. I last saw him in October 2015, when all he did was up my meds and tell me to speak to my keyworker, after he left me waiting around for 45 minutes. My first appointment with him, I waited in the waiting room for nearly 2 hours, and I was never called and then was told that he had already left before I'd even arrived. Whilst there was nowhere to sign in/no reception, several other staff had asked me my name and who I was there to see and told me to wait and they'd find out what was happening, only to tell me it wouldn't be much longer. I was then recorded as not attending/not turning up, even though I had the texts from my mum to say I was there when they tried to discharge me and when I finally did see him, he accused me of not showing up. The only way I've been able to get to finally see him as well is because my GP has had to send 2/3 letters asking for a referral as he needs it confirmed that my meds aren't the cause of other health issues, and my GP is concerned as my meds are meant to be checked every 3 months (although he has said that every 6 months is normal given what the mental health services are like) and I haven't seen him in a year.

    It's a shame, as in CAHMS my keyworker and consultant were so great and on the ball, and I did see my consultant at least every 6 months. I can't fault the CAHMS team at all, but adult services are something else. If you are wanting to be investigated, or to see them, just push and push and push at them.

    As it is, I'm probably going to be putting in a complaint and asking to see the other consultant who's a woman, and doesn't think adult's can't have ADD.
 
 
 
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Updated: October 6, 2016
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