This discussion is closed.
Laiticia
Badges: 0
#1
Report Thread starter 16 years ago
#1
Hi guys!
Hope you are all well and happy
I am really stuck on this one question sos anyone good at cHemistry is really needed here.
The question goes like this:
Predict the products at the negative and positive electrode whrn solutions of these salts are electrolysed: Sodium iodid, copper Nitrate and Pottasium.
Oh God will one of you just answer this question then it will be no more bothering you I just need this question answered pleez help me .
I am in desperate need of this question being answered.
Thanks
Laiticia
0
gemgems89
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#2
Report 16 years ago
#2
(Original post by Laiticia)
Hi guys!
Hope you are all well and happy
I am really stuck on this one question sos anyone good at cHemistry is really needed here.
The question goes like this:
Predict the products at the negative and positive electrode whrn solutions of these salts are electrolysed: Sodium iodid, copper Nitrate and Pottasium.
Oh God will one of you just answer this question then it will be no more bothering you I just need this question answered pleez help me .
I am in desperate need of this question being answered.
Thanks
Laiticia
Is this GCSE, because I think I can help. It seems similar to my metals module.
Ok, well I think, but I'm not entirely sure, so check before answering :

Potassium - on the negative electrode because Potassium is a metal and has a positive charge and therefore ends up on the negative electrode.

Copper Nitrate - ummmm on the positive electrode because it has a negative charge...I think.

Sodium iodid - not sure on this one, I'd think it's the positive electrode but not 100%.
0
crana
Badges:
#3
Report 16 years ago
#3
(Original post by Laiticia)
Hi guys!
Hope you are all well and happy
I am really stuck on this one question sos anyone good at cHemistry is really needed here.
The question goes like this:
Predict the products at the negative and positive electrode whrn solutions of these salts are electrolysed: Sodium iodid, copper Nitrate and Pottasium.
Oh God will one of you just answer this question then it will be no more bothering you I just need this question answered pleez help me .
I am in desperate need of this question being answered.
Thanks
Laiticia
Erm, potassium isn't a salt..
Sodium iodide and copper nitrate will ionise in solution ( I think this is right ) to form

na+
I-
Cu+
NO3-

Na + and Cu+ will go to the cathode (negative terminal) - copper will be deposited as a metal.. Na would be deposited as a metal except it would react with the water and go back into Na+ ions

I- and NO3 - would go to the anode (postive terminal) and you would probably get I2 formed in solution.. and I'm not sure abuot the NO3

Rosie
0
MadNatSci
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#4
Report 16 years ago
#4
(Original post by crana)
Erm, potassium isn't a salt..
Sodium iodide and copper nitrate will ionise in solution ( I think this is right ) to form

na+
I-
Cu+
NO3-

Na + and Cu+ will go to the cathode (negative terminal) - copper will be deposited as a metal.. Na would be deposited as a metal except it would react with the water and go back into Na+ ions

I- and NO3 - would go to the anode (postive terminal) and you would probably get I2 formed in solution.. and I'm not sure abuot the NO3

Rosie

NO3 should stay in solution - you'd get oxygen produced I *think*... Yes, oxygen at the anode, right? In the case of sodium at the cathode, the sodium would indeed go back to Na+ ions, meaning that hydrogen gas would be produced at the cathode.

So in the case of sodium iodide you'd get hydrogen gas produced at the cathode and iodine at the anode, leaving you with sodium hydroxide as the solution remaining (someone tell me if this is right because, as with most things, it's been a long time). With copper nitrate you'd get a deposit of copper metal at the cathode and oxygen released at the anode and I actually can't think what the solution remaining would be...

(I must stop drinking alcohol and maybe then I'll get my memory back)
0
Laiticia
Badges: 0
#5
Report Thread starter 16 years ago
#5
What about Pottasium Sulphate?
0
MadNatSci
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#6
Report 16 years ago
#6
(Original post by Laiticia)
What about Pottasium Sulphate?

Potassium is highly reactive so the potassium ions won't be released - they'll react and remain in solution. So at the cathode, hydrogen will be released because it's less reactive than potassium. I can't remember exactly what the rule is for the anode but I'm fairly certain you'll get oxygen gas - look it up though, just in case. It should be in the textbooks.
0
X
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Sheffield Hallam University
    Get into Teaching in South Yorkshire Undergraduate
    Wed, 26 Feb '20
  • The University of Law
    Solicitor Series: Assessing Trainee Skills – LPC, GDL and MA Law - London Moorgate campus Postgraduate
    Wed, 26 Feb '20
  • University of East Anglia
    PGCE Open day Postgraduate
    Sat, 29 Feb '20

Do you get study leave?

Yes- I like it (1)
50%
Yes- I don't like it (0)
0%
No- I want it (1)
50%
No- I don't want it (0)
0%

Watched Threads

View All