Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Doctors are known to be very respected after their hard work and commitment into helping a patient. However, we all know that despite this, doctors are famous for being depressed. If you were a doctor do you think you would also be someone suffering from depression or would you be suitable to deal with it? please express your ideas and thoughts that are relevant.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I think everyone would. It's only human to feel depressed when your surrounded by suffering...

    I know a lot of them have to disassociate themselves to try and stop themselves getting like that. I've a doctor friend of mine say some really quite cruel jokes that I've been 'like wow' and they've found it hilarious and you would have thought they would be the ones sensative to stuff like that. I think a lot of it is mid over matter and you have to make fun of it to deal with it. But ultimatly I think everyone would feel affected by it in some way or another.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ruto)
    Doctors are known to be very respected after their hard work and commitment into helping a patient. However, we all know that despite this, doctors are famous for being depressed. If you were a doctor do you think you would also be someone suffering from depression or would you be suitable to deal with it? please express your ideas and thoughts that are relevant.
    Preparing for an interview?
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Citalopram baby!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Beska)
    Citalopram baby!
    If I remember correctly, Citalopram isn't really used anymore due suicide risks. I'll check with the psych registrar tomorrow.

    To the OP: The GMC and occupational health are very understanding of mental health issues, and helping you cope with it and your workload. Be advised though what they really really don't like is you hiding the condition and then having a breakdown. If you do have mental health issues that are current then let any uni you go to know, they're really helpful and compassionate
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by winter_mute)
    If I remember correctly, Citalopram isn't really used anymore due suicide risks. I'll check with the psych registrar tomorrow.
    I've seen it prescribed quite a bit. :dontknow:

    e: Unless you are talking about it not being prescribed relatively recently.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by winter_mute)
    If I remember correctly, Citalopram isn't really used anymore due suicide risks. I'll check with the psych registrar tomorrow.
    Citalopram is used widely for depression & anxiety/OCD/eating disorders etc.
    The latest NICE guidance notes for depression in adults SSRIs including Citalopram are less toxic in overdose so may be better in people with suicidal intent.


    The 'suicide risks' idea (or increased frequency of suicidal thoughts!) might come from something about use in children/adolescents or manic switching in bipolar depression management without mood stabilization..?

    (Original post by Ruto)
    If you were a doctor do you think you would also be someone suffering from depression or would you be suitable to deal with it? please express your ideas and thoughts that are relevant.
    I don't think I suffer from depression, no.

    Coping strategies probably include:
    - Black humour (!)
    - Emotional detachment / ability to intellectualize it as a job at times
    - Outside interests - I also quite like not being at work ;-)
    - Support network of both medics & non medics to rant to

    In the job when I was arguably the most susceptible to depression (from transferrence & rubbish things happening like the completed suicide of one of my firm's inpatients whilst on leave) I probably felt the most emotional supported with good 'housekeeping' on the firm such as having a weekly 1:1 'supervision' with my consultant psychiatrist where we talked through things that bothered me.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Elles)
    Citalopram is used widely for depression & anxiety/OCD/eating disorders etc.
    The latest NICE guidance notes for depression in adults SSRIs including Citalopram are less toxic in overdose so may be better in people with suicidal intent.


    The 'suicide risks' idea (or increased frequency of suicidal thoughts!) might come from something about use in children/adolescents or manic switching in bipolar depression management without mood stabilization..?
    The suicide risk I was mentioning was more compulsion than overdose toxicity. And you're right it's children and adolescent use IIRC.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by winter_mute)
    The suicide risk I was mentioning was more compulsion than overdose toxicity. And you're right it's children and adolescent use IIRC.
    <tangent>

    Spoiler:
    Show
    It would be counter-intuitive for NICE to big up the advantage in people with suicidal intent with regards to overdose toxicity if there was strong evidence it increased suicidal drive though?

    I haven't really done any child psych except for a token medicals school placement but from what I remember it was controversial rather than equivocal but obviously made for quite horrifying headlines that suicide rates would be increased by an antidepressant so probably would have a big impact on prescribing patterns (not that many people go around dishing out psychotropic meds to children)...

    So I did a quick google & found this. Which I would take as reputable. :love: NIMH.
    http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topic...regivers.shtml
    The evidence seems to have been for suicidal thinking & behaviour rather than completed suicides. & subsequent indirect population studies have suggested against completed suicide rates being higher with SSRI use.


    </tangent>
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Back on topic:

    Stephen Fry did a really good documentary on Bipolar disorder and in it he interviews a GP that had several major Manic psychotic episodes, she describes how her workload changed to prevent these happening and the support she received. It was on youtube not too long ago, check there OP
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by winter_mute)
    If I remember correctly, Citalopram isn't really used anymore due suicide risks. I'll check with the psych registrar tomorrow.

    To the OP: The GMC and occupational health are very understanding of mental health issues, and helping you cope with it and your workload. Be advised though what they really really don't like is you hiding the condition and then having a breakdown. If you do have mental health issues that are current then let any uni you go to know, they're really helpful and compassionate


    No it's used, i've counter signed enough of it when adminstering it to know that!
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What newspaper do you read/prefer?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.