Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by biogigi)
    Hi guys! I'm still waiting for St Andrews to reply to my offer, and Imperial as well... I applied for biochemistry and I'm really torn between those two unis (if I manage to get the offers ofc). I really prefer St Andrews over Imperial when it comes to things like location (I hate the idea of studying in London..), traditions, the atmosphere (at Open Day it seemed like a heaven on earth!) etc. But then again I've heard that there are so much better job prospects when you graduate from Imperial.. Could someone from St Andrews tell me about the prospects of future career in science (I'd like to work in medical research)? Would it be mad to choose a biochemistry degree at St A. over Imperial?
    you will have better prospects at St Andrews if you do the 5 year Biochemistry Masters with the integrated year in industry. totally recommend it
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CollectiveSoul)
    you will have better prospects at St Andrews if you do the 5 year Biochemistry Masters with the integrated year in industry. totally recommend it
    I actually applied for the Masters course can you tell me something more? Are you still a student or have you graduated already?
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by biogigi)
    I actually applied for the Masters course can you tell me something more? Are you still a student or have you graduated already?
    the integrated masters biochemistry degree is uber-employable, i did the BSc.

    I graduated a few months ago and whilst a 'BSc Biology' st andrews student may find it 3% harder than a 'BSc Biology' Imperial student to find a job, my four years at St Andrews were a unique experience

    i would have hated a. being at imperial b. studying in london (where i normally live) c. the student satisfaction (or lack of it): according to the Guardian uni guide for Biosciences, St Andrews is #1 in the country for 'satisfaction with course'; imperial is 8th from bottom in the whole country
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Hi Y'all.
    I'm an American who first glanced at St Andrews simply because my grandmother wanted me to go. After looking through various rankings and statistics, as well as videos and descriptions of campus life, it has become a favorite. Although I wouldn't mind working in the UK after graduating, I would like to have job opportunities in North America as well. This is a major and reasonable concern that my parents share. I'm currently looking into a Management + Economics Bsc degree(sorry if this seems off, I am not used to the UK degree or university system).
    I was wondering, how are job prospects in North America for graduates? Better than other UK universities? How many internships are there in America and how are they? for management and other degrees? I saw that the graduate prospects were remarkable for St Andrews Management(and other subjects) and was just wondering if they carry over to the American job market.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Most American companies know that the American educational system is 'currupt' or at least not worth as much as it used to be. (Grades are internally marked etc so the marker can be influenced by students etc.) The U.K. has laws about being fair and equal to every student, even if it means that some students may struggle because they can't procrastinate and be as lackadaisical as they used to be.

    Getting a degree abroad should capture the interest of your boss anyway since you have more cultural experience from meeting people from different places, showing you can handle yourself and being able to handle a bigger workload from more in-depth courses.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by la_banane_verte)
    Balgove Larder is fantastic, but a bit interesting to get to if you don't have a car.

    Birrells was replaced by a shop called Heart Space, which is a bit more of a health food shop, but still stocks fruit and veg (http://wholefoods.heartspacedundee.co.uk/).

    The farmers' market is the first saturday of every month (https://www.fifefarmersmarket.co.uk/), but the number of shops has been dwindling lately which is quite sad. In the summer there's

    Allanhill farm shop(https://allanhill.co.uk/farm-shop/) which sells amazing strawberries that are grown just outside St Andrews.

    If you eat meat, there's the butchers on Bell Street (Minick's). There's also two bakers in town which both sell Fisher & Donaldson cakes and bread. There's the cheese shop I.J.Mellis on South St which is very popular and has a huge range of cheese, and also sell bread and apples.

    If you eat fish, the Tailend restaurant has a fish counter, or there's a few delivery services from Pittenweem where the local fish is landed.

    And finally, if you want ice cream, get it from Janettas!
    Thanks so much for this, all really useful info and I'm really excited to visit them for myself when I'm there!
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AnAmerican)
    Hi Y'all.
    I'm an American who first glanced at St Andrews simply because my grandmother wanted me to go. After looking through various rankings and statistics, as well as videos and descriptions of campus life, it has become a favorite. Although I wouldn't mind working in the UK after graduating, I would like to have job opportunities in North America as well. This is a major and reasonable concern that my parents share. I'm currently looking into a Management + Economics Bsc degree(sorry if this seems off, I am not used to the UK degree or university system).
    I was wondering, how are job prospects in North America for graduates? Better than other UK universities? How many internships are there in America and how are they? for management and other degrees? I saw that the graduate prospects were remarkable for St Andrews Management(and other subjects) and was just wondering if they carry over to the American job market.
    i only have anecdotal evidence but most of the americans who were in my first year at uni have gone on to do masters and phds at Yale, Princeton etc. and others in good jobs. now it could be that its as much to do with how well connected American st andrews students are (but don't get the impression they are snobbish) as how good their degree was, but even so having well connected friends and family sounds good in itself! I also found this quite amusing to read https://www.telegraph.co.uk/educatio...s.html?image=5
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AnAmerican)
    Hi Y'all.
    I'm an American who first glanced at St Andrews simply because my grandmother wanted me to go. After looking through various rankings and statistics, as well as videos and descriptions of campus life, it has become a favorite. Although I wouldn't mind working in the UK after graduating, I would like to have job opportunities in North America as well. This is a major and reasonable concern that my parents share. I'm currently looking into a Management + Economics Bsc degree(sorry if this seems off, I am not used to the UK degree or university system).
    I was wondering, how are job prospects in North America for graduates? Better than other UK universities? How many internships are there in America and how are they? for management and other degrees? I saw that the graduate prospects were remarkable for St Andrews Management(and other subjects) and was just wondering if they carry over to the American job market.
    With North America, they only know the "big name" universities. So St Andrews, Oxbridge, LSE, maybe Imperial or Kings, possibly Durham and Warwick. Any of those schools give you a pretty good reputation with North American employers.

    I'm Canadian, and had no problems getting interviews in Canada for business programs. St Andrews is a high ranked, internationally known school that also provides a good talking point in interviews and at networking events.

    If you're set on business/management, I'd also look at LSE, but St Andrews is a great option whether you're wanting to work in the UK or North America.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Hi everyone! I’ve currently got an unconditional offer for the 5 year Master in Physics course and I’m so excited to start in September! I’m wondering if anyone here has graduated or is currently studying this course can tell me a bit more about the modules/course structure. How flexible are they, for example can I take modules in chemistry or is it just physics/maths related things? I was wondering if a language such as Latin/Gaelic would be an option too like some universities. Thank you in advance!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SaintsGrad)
    With North America, they only know the "big name" universities. So St Andrews, Oxbridge, LSE, maybe Imperial or Kings, possibly Durham and Warwick. Any of those schools give you a pretty good reputation with North American employers.

    I'm Canadian, and had no problems getting interviews in Canada for business programs. St Andrews is a high ranked, internationally known school that also provides a good talking point in interviews and at networking events.

    If you're set on business/management, I'd also look at LSE, but St Andrews is a great option whether you're wanting to work in the UK or North America.
    Thanks so much!
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by Tylaag)
    Hi everyone! I’ve currently got an unconditional offer for the 5 year Master in Physics course and I’m so excited to start in September! I’m wondering if anyone here has graduated or is currently studying this course can tell me a bit more about the modules/course structure. How flexible are they, for example can I take modules in chemistry or is it just physics/maths related things? I was wondering if a language such as Latin/Gaelic would be an option too like some universities. Thank you in advance!
    We have Latin modules (https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/media/p...-1000&2000.pdf), so provided you can fit them into your timetable (there are specific Physics modules you must take, see https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/subject...ysics&level=ug or https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/subject...?1520442071189) you can take Latin modules. However there's a limit on how many Arts Faculty modules you can take as a Science student (I can't remember the exact number of credits, it's either 40 or 80 I think...your adviser or the admissions office would be able to give you the proper number).

    Unfortunately we don't offer Gaelic, we used to have an evening language course in it but we lost the tutor for it a couple of years ago. The Celtic Society were trying to run some classes but I don't know how frequent those are (https://www.facebook.com/groups/celticsoc/about/).

    Edit: just spotted you asked about whether you have to stick to Physics/Maths. The answer is no! As long as you take your prerequisites for your degree which I linked to above, you can take absolutley any module in the Science Faculty (or cross-faculty schools) that fits in your timetable, and a certain number of Arts Faculty modules.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    How's free speech?
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AnAmerican)
    How's free speech?
    In my opinion there is sometimes a bit too much. Everyone speaks their mind.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AnAmerican)
    How's free speech?
    in what sense?
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by AnAmerican)
    How's free speech?
    What do you mean by this?
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    I don't understand why I have to apply for scholarships before having heard back... is it standard procedure in the UK? It seems so strange that the deadline for applications for scholarships is 1 of april and they can contact you also on 31 of march. What do british students do? Apply as soon as possible to every scholarship available and then hope they will be accepted? Please answer me because this is driving me crazy!
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    In regards to sport, how do the Uni pick who is on the first teams and second teams and so on? Also, are there teams where you play non competitively?
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    and also... how much does it take to apply for scholarships? Have I still time? Do I also need to apply for accommodation before having heard back?
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    Hi! I received an offer to study medicine at St Andrews. I was wondering if anyone has any insight into the coarse (I know the structure but I was wondering if the high student satisfaction is actually warrented)

    Thanks!
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mol_ly)
    In regards to sport, how do the Uni pick who is on the first teams and second teams and so on? Also, are there teams where you play non competitively?
    Most sports teams do tryouts and it depends how well you do in the tryouts (which level they think you're at), as to whether you get put on a particular team. As far as I know, all clubs seem to have a non-competitive side as well, but you don't have to try out for that I don't think.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: October 13, 2018
Poll
Black Friday: Yay or Nay?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.