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    (Original post by Bekaboo)
    While I absolutely agree that it's the competitiveness that's the issue, I don't know if this is true for every GM course, but the ones I know about are in 4 years, not 5. Sounds harder to me.
    you seem to be arguing that, say, quantum physics degrees are in demand.
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    (Original post by Gizmo!)
    you seem to be arguing that, say, quantum physics degrees are in demand.

    Sorry, you've lost me. I don't usually stay up this late What I meant was, logically, if one is to complete a degree in 4 years rather than 5, one will have to work harder. Not that a 4 year degree is intrinsically harder than one that takes 5.

    I don't even know why I'm arguing about this. I know full well how competitive grad med is - I've got several friends doing it! I just answered without thinking.
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    I honestly don't see it calming down any time soon. In the past year, applications have risen steadily by 3-4% each year since about 2002 (I'll try and find the census data from UCAS I was looking at). Apparently, this year, applications increased 30%.

    I put a lot of that down to the tuition fee scare and the fact that people don't want to defer, but think about it like this - that isn't going to go away. People go into Medicine for different reasons, whether it's because the enjoy the idea of helping people, the idea of a very intensive and applied scientific course/job, or, in reality, job security.

    I think a lot more people will be applying for Medicine on the sole grounds that it leads to a secure job position that doesn't really fluctuate that much, no matter the current world affairs. Those people would have been on the fence beforehand, but they will now be convinced that Medicine is for them on the advice of their parents and peers, even if they know it isn't.

    So, I would definitely go for another gap year. If you have the grades, and you have the ECs(where relevant), the work experience and the determination, you stand a much higher chance of getting in after a gap year than you do through GEM. GEM is going to be showing the same trends, and it's competitive enough already. More and more science graduates will opt into doing Medicine than the alternative of a job that no longer exists.

    That was a bit of a depressing post, but it's my honest appraisal.

    EDIT: I may have put a bit too much emphasis on the whole 'job security' thing, but despite what people say, I do think that can be a factor, especially in graduates.
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    Did everyone else notice we're 'Forum Assistants'.

    Lawl. April Fools. .
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    (Original post by TwilightKnight)
    I honestly don't see it calming down any time soon. In the past year, applications have risen steadily by 3-4% each year since about 2002 (I'll try and find the census data from UCAS I was looking at). Apparently, this year, applications increased 30%.
    My course director told me that medicine admissions were down for 2011 entry compared to 2010 :holmes: I think it was only 3-4%, but where did you get your stats from?
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    (Original post by xXxBaby-BooxXx)
    My course director told me that medicine admissions were down for 2011 entry compared to 2010 :holmes: I think it was only 3-4%, but where did you get your stats from?
    He could've taken to from overall applications, not just for medicine? Or it could be a specific university he's thinking of?

    96% of statistics are made up on the spot.
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    (Original post by Bekaboo)

    Sorry, you've lost me. I don't usually stay up this late What I meant was, logically, if one is to complete a degree in 4 years rather than 5, one will have to work harder. Not that a 4 year degree is intrinsically harder than one that takes 5.

    I don't even know why I'm arguing about this. I know full well how competitive grad med is - I've got several friends doing it! I just answered without thinking.
    At the majority of med schools offering the 4 year courses and 5 year courses, the only difference between the two is the first year. Once the 4 year course medics have completed their first year they move into year 3 of the 5 year course (albeit their year 2). Most 4 year courses require a life science degree for entry, this is because much of the basic bioscience (cell biology, biochemistry etc) is removed from the curriculum, allowing them to condense 2 years work into 1 without making it insanely difficult (so you basically spend a year learning anatomy and physiology).

    My point is, it's not as though you're squeezing a 5year course into a 4 year one. It's only the 1st (pre-clinical) year that is different.

    What the guy above was aiming at, was that you implied in a previous post that the difficulty of gaining entry to a course reflects the difficulty of the course itself. This is obviously not true - I'm sure a physics degree is much more challenging academically than medicine, but arguably much easier to get into.
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    (Original post by theatrical)
    At the majority of med schools offering the 4 year courses and 5 year courses, the only difference between the two is the first year. Once the 4 year course medics have completed their first year they move into year 3 of the 5 year course (albeit their year 2). Most 4 year courses require a life science degree for entry, this is because much of the basic bioscience (cell biology, biochemistry etc) is removed from the curriculum, allowing them to condense 2 years work into 1 without making it insanely difficult (so you basically spend a year learning anatomy and physiology).

    My point is, it's not as though you're squeezing a 5year course into a 4 year one. It's only the 1st (pre-clinical) year that is different.

    What the guy above was aiming at, was that you implied in a previous post that the difficulty of gaining entry to a course reflects the difficulty of the course itself. This is obviously not true - I'm sure a physics degree is much more challenging academically than medicine, but arguably much easier to get into.
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=1592193

    pls help people
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    (Original post by theatrical)
    What the guy above was aiming at, was that you implied in a previous post that the difficulty of gaining entry to a course reflects the difficulty of the course itself. This is obviously not true - I'm sure a physics degree is much more challenging academically than medicine, but arguably much easier to get into.
    See paragraph 2, in which I admit to typing before thinking.
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    (Original post by TwilightKnight)
    EDIT: I may have put a bit too much emphasis on the whole 'job security' thing, but despite what people say, I do think that can be a factor, especially in graduates.
    It definitely is. I'm a grad and job security was certainly one of the factors that lead me to choose medicine (I didn't apply for medicine before doing my degree, the uncertainty of what to do after my degree is what lead me to apply).

    School leavers seem to have this preoccupation with thinking that you should only do medicine if you have some overwhelming desire to help people (or they think that's what addmissions tutors want to hear).
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    (Original post by alia)
    guys listen: Im not taking another ****ing gap year......gem cant be as competitive personally because i could only apply to two unis as i didnt have bio just chem,physics,maths
    Why not take another gap year and teach yourself biology A-level, or do an intensive course at a college in 1 year? That way you can apply to pretty much any of the unis (grades dependent). Surely this would have been the logical thing to do on your 1st gap year?

    I've taught myself both biology & chemistry this year whilst juggling work exp for veterinary and a part time job. All it takes is a little bit of time management.

    One thing to note is if you apply as a grad I'm pretty sure most unis (assumption based on vet med which is 6/7) want you to have both biol & chem A-levels. Unless you have a degree based on biol & chem. But I would have assumed you wouldn't get onto a course like this without biology?
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    (Original post by OJHW)
    Why not take another gap year and teach yourself biology A-level, or do an intensive course at a college in 1 year? That way you can apply to pretty much any of the unis (grades dependent). Surely this would have been the logical thing to do on your 1st gap year?

    I've taught myself both biology & chemistry this year whilst juggling work exp for veterinary and a part time job. All it takes is a little bit of time management.

    One thing to note is if you apply as a grad I'm pretty sure most unis (assumption based on vet med which is 6/7) want you to have both biol & chem A-levels. Unless you have a degree based on biol & chem. But I would have assumed you wouldn't get onto a course like this without biology?
    pharmacy count?
 
 
 
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