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    For investment banking you could not get any better than LSE, Im pretty sure!
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    (Original post by lsadjadi)
    I did consider this, but I'm not sure if Bath is better or not.. I know LSE sounds impressive, but if the Bath course is more specific to banking it might help me out more?
    I love how people say they want to go into Investment Banking when e.g. I'm pretty sure you don't even know what exactly it is. Your Bath course is Accounting and finance which might be more specific to a career in accounting. Which is not what IB's do. Economics is definitely a more suitable starting point to a career in Investment Banking. Furthermore, most things one learns in school do not 'directly' help them in their career.

    Its the economics of signalling (which you will learn about if you do economics):
    What we study won't really help us career wise (of course this has more to do with social sciences like econ). Thus, we should choose hard courses as a way of signalling to our employers that we are clever, and hence the right people for the future job. The LSE course will signal better to your employers rather than the obviously easier Bath course. Hence you're more likely to get a job in IB from LSE. This is a true phenomenon. Even the course admin of the Stanford MBA said that the MBA itself doesn't give much value. Its getting in which is the hard part thereby signalling your intelligence!
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    (Original post by MissOxford)
    I love how people say they want to go into Investment Banking when e.g. I'm pretty sure you don't even know what exactly it is. Your Bath course is Accounting and finance which might be more specific to a career in accounting. Which is not what IB's do. Economics is definitely a more suitable starting point to a career in Investment Banking. Furthermore, most things one learns in school do not 'directly' help them in their career.

    Its the economics of signalling (which you will learn about if you do economics):
    What we study won't really help us career wise (of course this has more to do with social sciences like econ). Thus, we should choose hard courses as a way of signalling to our employers that we are clever, and hence the right people for the future job. The LSE course will signal better to your employers rather than the obviously easier Bath course. Hence you're more likely to get a job in IB from LSE. This is a true phenomenon. Even the course admin of the Stanford MBA said that the MBA itself doesn't give much value. Its getting in which is the hard part thereby signalling your intelligence!

    I dont agree with the first bit. Accounting and Finance will teach you the basis of analysing companies if Investment Banking is what you wanna do. I'm talking about the specific IBD divisions within banks. For S&T Economics may be better, but all the excel modelling done for merger models and leveraged buyouts use finance not economics. That said, the course is irrelevant. Going to the best university is the way to get in. In this case LSE.
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    (Original post by djikstra)
    I dont agree with the first bit. Accounting and Finance will teach you the basis of analysing companies if Investment Banking is what you wanna do. I'm talking about the specific IBD divisions within banks. For S&T Economics may be better, but all the excel modelling done for merger models and leveraged buyouts use finance not economics. That said, the course is irrelevant. Going to the best university is the way to get in. In this case LSE.
    I am of course aware that Accounting and Finance does teach one things that will be helpful in M&A. But I was trying to make a wider point that Accounting and Finance is not as relevant to a career in IB than the OP thinks. Additioanlly most universities offering economics give students the opportunities to do courses in finance. I know from my friends that principles of finance at LSE is a very popular course. So in fact they would be getting the information anyways. I had this in mid as I wrote my comment.
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    LSE hands down.
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    (Original post by lsadjadi)
    I've had an offer from LSE for Mathematics and Economics (A*AA) and one from Bath for Accounting and Finance (AAA) and I have no idea which to choose. The Bath course involves a paid year in industry and the possibility of doing an academic exchange for a semester in fourth year and overall looks a lot simpler, whereas LSE's course looks very challenging, however the name is a lot more impressive. Eventually I want to go into investment banking in the city, and I don't know which one will help me more to achieve this.

    So yeah. Literally any advice will be appreciated.
    LSE has the better reputation. However, there are many other factors to take into account as well: course structure (obviously the courses aren't identical and yes, LSE will probably be more intense); surroundings (London is vastly different to Bath); accommodation; expense (London = very expensive); general student satisfaction (you might be happier in one place over the other).

    You shouldn't make your decision entirely based on reputation - so many students do that and regret it. Yes, LSE as a university will get you better employment prospects, but saying that, a paid year in industry will be invaluable and if you make the most of that year, employers will be extremely keen to snap you up.

    I have no idea what sort of degree you need for Investment Banking. It seems that Accounting and Finance would be the best route, but I'm sure Mathemtics/Economics can't be far off either.

    I suggest you have a look at the courses individually, and decide which one you would prefer to do. Then, visit each individual university and spend a day in their respective cities and you should get a feel for where you'll be happiest. Remember, you will succeed where you're happy. An offer from Cambridge isn't a prerequisite for success. The same applies to everywhere else.
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    (Original post by Rascacielos)
    LSE has the better reputation. However, there are many other factors to take into account as well: course structure (obviously the courses aren't identical and yes, LSE will probably be more intense); surroundings (London is vastly different to Bath); accommodation; expense (London = very expensive); general student satisfaction (you might be happier in one place over the other).

    You shouldn't make your decision entirely based on reputation - so many students do that and regret it. Yes, LSE as a university will get you better employment prospects, but saying that, a paid year in industry will be invaluable and if you make the most of that year, employers will be extremely keen to snap you up.

    I have no idea what sort of degree you need for Investment Banking. It seems that Accounting and Finance would be the best route, but I'm sure Mathemtics/Economics can't be far off either.

    I suggest you have a look at the courses individually, and decide which one you would prefer to do. Then, visit each individual university and spend a day in their respective cities and you should get a feel for where you'll be happiest. Remember, you will succeed where you're happy. An offer from Cambridge isn't a prerequisite for success. The same applies to everywhere else.

    If you have no idea what sort of degree would be more favorable for Investment Banking, how on earth can you follow on and say that 'A+F would be the best route.'

    You've got to also remember OP that investment banks target certain Universities - LSE being one of the key targets...Don't quote me on this, but isn't Bath a mere 'Semi-Target' ?
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    (Original post by Chrisl12345)

    You've got to also remember OP that investment banks target certain Universities - LSE being one of the key targets...Don't quote me on this, but isn't Bath a mere 'Semi-Target' ?

    From what I've read, it seems employers target Bath students aswell because the university has lots of links with various companies for the third year placement, and it is possible to get a job out of that placement. Obviously LSE sounds a lot better, but another factor I have to consider is the grades. I got an A in maths a level in year 12, so I have to retake a module in order to get an A* - and with the university fees going up next year I'm not sure if it's worth taking the risk of not getting into one of my top choices if I would have similar career prospects at the end of both.


    Also, thank you everyone who posted, I really appreciate it!
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    (Original post by lsadjadi)
    From what I've read, it seems employers target Bath students aswell because the university has lots of links with various companies for the third year placement, and it is possible to get a job out of that placement. Obviously LSE sounds a lot better, but another factor I have to consider is the grades. I got an A in maths a level in year 12, so I have to retake a module in order to get an A* - and with the university fees going up next year I'm not sure if it's worth taking the risk of not getting into one of my top choices if I would have similar career prospects at the end of both.


    Also, thank you everyone who posted, I really appreciate it!
    I'm fairly certain it is still classed as a 'semi-target.' I'd definitely not choose Bath purely based upon the 'links with various companies'.. If you prefer Bath and the course they offer - you have your answer. You will have plenty of opportunities to apply for spring and/or summer internships especially if you are studying M+E at LSE..These are more likely to be tailored towards the industry you want to go into as well. I don't know a great deal about Bath's placement year with A+F - But surely it will be with an Accounting firm and not an IB?

    As others have suggested, your best bet for IB is LSE..The whole atmosphere at LSE is based around IB's (huge generalisation :P)

    I've a few friends at LSE - all have completed spring/summer internships at IB's - J.P, MS to name a few...

    Ultimately - I'd advise you to pick your University based upon the course you would be happiest studying and where you would like to be.
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    (Original post by Chrisl12345)
    I'm fairly certain it is still classed as a 'semi-target.' I'd definitely not choose Bath purely based upon the 'links with various companies'.. If you prefer Bath and the course they offer - you have your answer. You will have plenty of opportunities to apply for spring and/or summer internships especially if you are studying M+E at LSE..These are more likely to be tailored towards the industry you want to go into as well. I don't know a great deal about Bath's placement year with A+F - But surely it will be with an Accounting firm and not an IB?

    As others have suggested, your best bet for IB is LSE..The whole atmosphere at LSE is based around IB's (huge generalisation :P)

    I've a few friends at LSE - all have completed spring/summer internships at IB's - J.P, MS to name a few...

    Ultimately - I'd advise you to pick your University based upon the course you would be happiest studying and where you would like to be.

    Thanks, this helped a lot!
 
 
 
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