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Is there a language that dyslexics can process as easily as non-dyslexics? watch

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    I can actually think of two examples:
    - Mathematics
    - Sign Language

    However, neither quite satisfy my requirements. I would like to know of a writing system, with which knowledge can be transmitted as easily as in English, but it should be much easier to process for dyslexic people than any other current writing system.

    Surely someone has tried to develop such a writing system? Or is it impossible?
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    Hmm . . . It's a good question. I often wonder how they cope with different alphabets.

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    (Original post by llys)
    I can actually think of two examples:
    - Mathematics
    - Sign Language

    However, neither quite satisfy my requirements. I would like to know of a writing system, with which knowledge can be transmitted as easily as in English, but it should be much easier to process for dyslexic people than any other current writing system.

    Surely someone has tried to develop such a writing system? Or is it impossible?


    I find this topic really interesting. When I finally qualify as a Speech and language therpaist, I'll let you know if I find anything
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    But dyslexia is normally do to with reading, dyspraxia is writing - so do you mean an alternative reading system?
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    (Original post by bubble999)
    But dyslexia is normally do to with reading, dyspraxia is writing - so do you mean an alternative reading system?
    It comes down to the same though, surely? If you've an alternative writing system, you'll have an alternate reading system by extension.
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    (Original post by shadowdweller)
    It comes down to the same though, surely? If you've an alternative writing system, you'll have an alternate reading system by extension.
    Not necessarily, an alternative writing system could be using speech which is then generated into written mode, or better, a device which has large letters/input keys (as dyspraxia is often due to fine motor skills, not always brain processing). Generally for those who cannot read with ease (dyslexia), a system which would just read language for you, wouldn't be helpful in developing reading further.
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    (Original post by bubble999)
    I find this topic really interesting. When I finally qualify as a Speech and language therpaist, I'll let you know if I find anything
    Thanks.

    (Original post by Edminzodo)
    Hmm . . . It's a good question. I often wonder how they cope with different alphabets.

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    There are alphabetic languages that are much easier to read because they have less orthographic depth than English (Italian, Finnish, German etc.). However, dyslexic pupils still struggle with them. Dyslexia is less common in China (2% vs 5%), and reading in Chinese apparently uses a different part of your brain, so it is actually possible to be dyslexic in Chinese, but not English, and the other way round (example English-Japanese).

    But even if English dyslexics in general were not to have problems with reading in chinese, I wouldn't like that system, because SO much memorisation is required to learn to read Chinese to a good level. The effort wouldn't be worth it, or at least, I think there has to be a better solution!
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    (Original post by llys)
    Thanks.



    There are alphabetic languages that are much easier to read because they have less orthographic depth than English (Italian, Finnish, German etc.). However, dyslexic pupils still struggle with them. Dyslexia is less common in China (2% vs 5%), and reading in Chinese apparently uses a different part of your brain, so it is actually possible to be dyslexic in Chinese, but not English, and the other way round (example English-Japanese).

    But even if English dyslexics in general were not to have problems with reading in chinese, I wouldn't like that system, because SO much memorisation is required to learn to read Chinese to a good level. The effort wouldn't be worth it, or at least, I think there has to be a better solution!
    English is an odd language for sure, most of the words originate from the Anglo-Saxon era or the Greeks/Italians. Many of our so called 'rules' don't fully make sense. So I think this may be a contributing factor, for sure.
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    Here is another interesting article. Perhaps pictograms really are the way forward. It seems so much more complicated though...
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    (Original post by bubble999)
    But dyslexia is normally do to with reading, dyspraxia is writing - so do you mean an alternative reading system?
    Hmmm... I think I mean a writing system that is easy to read!
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    We could experiment by seeing how quickly dyslexic and non dyslexic people learn particular languages and draw an average, although there certainly a lot of factors to take into account that might distort it, i'm very interested in this question, and would be interested if anyone has any other ideas as to how we could test it.

    (Original post by bubble999)
    English is an odd language for sure, most of the words originate from the Anglo-Saxon era or the Greeks/Italians. Many of our so called 'rules' don't fully make sense. So I think this may be a contributing factor, for sure.
    What do you mean when you say they do not make sense? With respect to orthography they certainly don't, although I have gotten to a stage where I can spell things intuitively when writing by hand, but I make stupid mistakes on the computer because it seems to be all be based on memory rather than laws.
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    (Original post by bubble999)
    Not necessarily, an alternative writing system could be using speech which is then generated into written mode, or better, a device which has large letters/input keys (as dyspraxia is often due to fine motor skills, not always brain processing). Generally for those who cannot read with ease (dyslexia), a system which would just read language for you, wouldn't be helpful in developing reading further.
    Surely that's a writing method, rather than a writing system? I mean the latter - for instance, like was mentioned earlier, Chinese vs alphabetic languages in terms of ease of reading. So if you develop a writing system that is easier - i.e structure or formation - then you also have an alternative reading system.
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    Hieroglyphics?

    Not sure if you will be dyslexic in that or not...
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    There is lots of cross-language comparisons for dyslexia, and as someone mentioned, it is less common in languages that are more phonetically regular. If you have access to academic journals you can search and come up with a load of papers on dyslexia (probably hundreds of thousands!)

    In theory, we could also change English to be more phonetically regular with regards to spelling to make it easier, but realistically that is never going to happen because everyone would have to learn how to read and write again
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    (Original post by *Interrobang*)
    In theory, we could also change English to be more phonetically regular with regards to spelling to make it easier, but realistically that is never going to happen because everyone would have to learn how to read and write again
    I actually wouldn't like this option, because dyslexic people will still have trouble (if they are dyslexic because they cannot "sound out" words). It would make it easier to learn to read, but I would prefer something that takes even less effort for dyslexics.

    I actually had a great idea yesterday; I will try to work it out over the next few weeks and then test it on you guys.
 
 
 
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