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Graduate employment at record high? watch

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    Read the full story here on The Telegraph

    "The number of graduates entering employment six months after leaving university is at a record high, according to a new report.

    The research, published today, reveals that nearly 200,000 graduates from the 2013/14 cohort are currently working in the UK, 76.6 per cent of the total number, up from 75.6 per cent last year.

    Unemployment also fell during the last 12 months, going from 7.3 per cent in 2012/13, to 6.3 per cent for the most recent figures."

    But hugely varying by degree.

    Does this match up with your reality?
    • TSR Community Team
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    TSR Community Team
    Can someone explain the graphs to me? They're confusing.

    On the big graph, Performing Arts is right near the bottom for further work and study, but it's also in the Top 10 lowest unemployment rates graph.

    Some of them have high % on the big graph but are in the top 10 highest unemployment rates, which makes sense if they're going in to further study. But that doesn't make sense for Performing Arts.

    "While computer science graduates have some of the highest unemployment - and employment rates (:confused:)- they are also some of the most likely to enter a career related to their degree subject."
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    (Original post by Captain Jack)
    Does this match up with your reality?
    There seem to be more jobs available in general compared to a couple of years ago. Indeed; we are in a much stronger position than the late 00s when some of our..older.. members may have graduated

    My company has recently increased it's graduate intake and I've been seeing alot more graduate roles advertised elsewhere.
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    (Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
    Can someone explain the graphs to me? They're confusing.

    On the big graph, Performing Arts is right near the bottom for further work and study, but it's also in the Top 10 lowest unemployment rates graph.
    Bit weird. the 2nd and 3rd graphs have the 'further study' stripped out. And I'm not sure if the 1st, top graph is actually the top performing ones? So there are hundreds of degrees beneath that with worse scores? Dunno.

    "While computer science graduates have some of the highest unemployment - and employment rates (:confused:)- they are also some of the most likely to enter a career related to their degree subject."
    Haha, gobbledygook!

    (Original post by Reue)
    There seem to be more jobs available in general compared to a couple of years ago. Indeed; we are in a much stronger position than the late 00s when some of our..older.. members may have graduated

    My company has recently increased it's graduate intake and I've been seeing alot more graduate roles advertised elsewhere.
    That's cool, there definitely seems to be more grad roles on the market at the mo.
    • TSR Community Team
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    jenhasdreams Help :argh:

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...35&postcount=2
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    (Original post by Captain Jack)
    Haha, gobbledygook!
    Well, no. It just means there are a lot of unemployed computer science graduates, and that a high proportion of such graduates is unemployed (and therefore that the high number unemployed is not just due to the sheer number of CS graduates).
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    Well, no. It just means there are a lot of unemployed computer science graduates, and that a high proportion of such graduates is unemployed (and therefore that the high number unemployed is not just due to the sheer number of CS graduates).
    *woosh*

    You mean the graph is mixing up numbers of graduates as well as percentage of those in employment?
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    I wonder how CS has the highest unemployment rate.
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    (Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
    *woosh*

    You mean the graph is mixing up numbers of graduates as well as percentage of those in employment?
    No. I was commenting on Captain Jack's second quote. I didn't study the graph.
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    (Original post by Gherk)
    I wonder how CS has the highest unemployment rate.
    If it does, the obvious answer is that too many people are studying CS at the moment for the number of employment opportunities available, and that they are unable or unwilling to take alternative employment.
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    (Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
    "While computer science graduates have some of the highest unemployment - and employment rates (:confused:)- they are also some of the most likely to enter a career related to their degree subject."
    How does that even work?
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    Well, no. 1.It just means there are a lot of unemployed computer science graduates, and that 2.a high proportion of such graduates is unemployed (and therefore that the high number unemployed is not just due to the sheer number of CS graduates).
    1. Ok

    2. A high proportion of "such graduates" (where "such graduates" refers to the " unemployed cs graduates") is unemployed. Surely, this is a tautology. That proportion is 100%. It's like saying that there is a high proportion of 2.1 degree holders among and that a high proportion of such degree holders has a 2.1
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    (Original post by Juichiro)
    1. Ok

    2. A high proportion of "such graduates" (where "such graduates" refers to the " unemployed cs graduates") is unemployed. Surely, this is a tautology. That proportion is 100%. It's like saying that there is a high proportion of 2.1 degree holders among and that a high proportion of such degree holders has a 2.1
    By "such graduates", I meant "CS graduates", not "unemployed CS graduates".
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    By "such graduates", I meant "CS graduates", not "unemployed CS graduates".
    Well, your phrasing was ambiguous.

    Checking your message, I see that there was no easy way to communicate your message unambiguously.
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    (Original post by Juichiro)
    Well, your phrasing was ambiguous.

    Checking your message, I see that there was no easy way to communicate your message unambiguously.
    I suppose I could have expressed it in an algorithm.
    • TSR Group Staff
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    I think it's because there's several outcomes, and they don't mention some of them at all:

    1. Unemployed
    2. Part time work or other (travelling, homemaker etc - but not claiming unemployment)
    3. Full time work or further study

    So for performing arts: a low % are unemployed, a low % are in full time work / study, but a high % are in group 2 - I would assume!
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    But I agree that the article is poorly written, lines like this "highest unemployment - and employment rates" are particularly confusing - because by employment they mean their definition of employment, for one.
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    I wonder how many of those jobs are actually related to the degrees people do. Majority of the time it's something sale-based.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    By "such graduates", I meant "CS graduates", not "unemployed CS graduates".
    (Original post by Good bloke)
    I suppose I could have expressed it in an algorithm.
    I'm glad we had this conversation, it's really cleared everything up :lol:

    (Original post by jenhasdreams)
    I think it's because there's several outcomes, and they don't mention some of them at all:

    1. Unemployed
    2. Part time work or other (travelling, homemaker etc - but not claiming unemployment)
    3. Full time work or further study

    So for performing arts: a low % are unemployed, a low % are in full time work / study, but a high % are in group 2 - I would assume!
    This would make sense but it's still completely confusing :bricks:
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    I suppose I could have expressed it in an algorithm.
    Yes, you could have. It would have amused me. What's your academic background, by the way?
 
 
 
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