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    Hello,

    Some universities have "Electrical and Mechanical Engineering" degrees, which connect both specialisations into one degree (e.g. University of Edinburgh, University of Strathclyde..).

    Since Electrical and Mechanical eng. degree takes the same amount of time as doing Mechanical Engineering or Electrical Engineering alone, how much content is lost in that combined degree ? How competitive would be a graduate with this combined degree, comparing to those who took Electrical or Mechanical as separate courses ?

    Thank you
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    (Original post by Acrotipianusa)
    Hello,

    Some universities have "Electrical and Mechanical Engineering" degrees, which connect both specialisations into one degree (e.g. University of Edinburgh, University of Strathclyde..).

    Since Electrical and Mechanical eng. degree takes the same amount of time as doing Mechanical Engineering or Electrical Engineering alone, how much content is lost in that combined degree ? How competitive would be a graduate with this combined degree, comparing to those who took Electrical or Mechanical as separate courses ?

    Thank you
    You obviously lose some content, and it's my impression that such degrees are biased towards one of the main disciplines rather than being a true fifty-fifty (could be wrong, though), but from what I have seen you are not any less competitive on the jobs market.
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    You could always do aero instead, that's effectively Electronic+Mechanical, although you tend to do less electronic until later on when you can choose modules.
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    Bristol university is looking into introducing this course too. It seems they will have more of a focus on electromechanical systems such as motors, actuators, AC/DC machines etc. Communication and digital modules will probably not be in these degree courses. I'm not too sure about the mechanical modules that I would expect to typically be overlooked in this course.
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    I think this approach of combining the two subjects started in the 2000s. In many universities its present by the name of "Engineering Systems". Note that you roughly study subjects of both discipline but in not as much detail. So for instance someone studying MEchanical Engineering would study Fluid Mechanics for three semesters. In engineering systems they would study it once or max twice
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    Uni of Bath has a course like this. It's called Integrated Mechanical and Electrical Engineering. In the first two years you do a combo of both disciplines, then in the last 2 years you will be picking subjects freely from either discipline.
 
 
 
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