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Engineering

Which courses do you do in university for this?
Original post by Dorcasu
Which courses do you do in university for this?

Universities offer many different types of engineering courses. For example, Mechanical Engineering, Aeronautical Engineering, Structural Engineering, Civil Engineering, Chemical Engineering, etc. What sort of engineering were you interested in?
Reply 2
Original post by DataVenia

Universities offer many different types of engineering courses. For example, Mechanical Engineering, Aeronautical Engineering, Structural Engineering, Civil Engineering, Chemical Engineering, etc. What sort of engineering were you interested in?


Process engineering if not system engineering. I haven't gone through all the types of engineering especially since some don't appear on different forums.
Original post by Dorcasu
Process engineering if not system engineering. I haven't gone through all the types of engineering especially since some don't appear on different forums.

OK. So, just to double check, your question is: "If I want to become a Process Engineer or a System Engineer, what degree should I study at university?" Is that right?
Reply 4
Original post by DataVenia

OK. So, just to double check, your question is: "If I want to become a Process Engineer or a System Engineer, what degree should I study at university?" Is that right?


Yes.
Original post by Dorcasu
Yes.

Process Engineers design, implement and optimise chemical and biochemical processes, especially continuous flow ones on an industrial scale to turn raw materials such as oil, natural gas or milk (using heat, pressure or a chemical agent) into an end product (e.g. drugs, milk formula, gasoline, beer, butter, bulk chemicals, etc.). Process engineers are typically trained in chemical engineering. There are degrees which focus on process engineering, but they tend to be postgraduate qualifications.

Education in systems engineering is often seen as an extension to the regular engineering courses, reflecting the industry attitude that engineering students need a foundational background in one of the traditional engineering disciplines (e.g. aerospace engineering, civil engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, manufacturing engineering, industrial engineering, chemical engineering) - plus practical, real-world experience to be effective as systems engineers. The undergraduate degree most closely aligned with systems engineering is probably industrial engineering.
Reply 6
Original post by DataVenia

Process Engineers design, implement and optimise chemical and biochemical processes, especially continuous flow ones on an industrial scale to turn raw materials such as oil, natural gas or milk (using heat, pressure or a chemical agent) into an end product (e.g. drugs, milk formula, gasoline, beer, butter, bulk chemicals, etc.). Process engineers are typically trained in chemical engineering. There are degrees which focus on process engineering, but they tend to be postgraduate qualifications.

Education in systems engineering is often seen as an extension to the regular engineering courses, reflecting the industry attitude that engineering students need a foundational background in one of the traditional engineering disciplines (e.g. aerospace engineering, civil engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, manufacturing engineering, industrial engineering, chemical engineering) - plus practical, real-world experience to be effective as systems engineers. The undergraduate degree most closely aligned with systems engineering is probably industrial engineering.


Thank you for the information. 🙏 I'll search around what you have given me.

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