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    I completely understand the fact that there is a UMS scale at which raw marks are converted to reflecting overall student's performances on a paper. But is there any sort of algorithm to how they come to be?
    Is it something as simple as the top 10% get an an A* for example? Or do they work out what they assume and A and an E to be and then divide by 5 to get the difference between grades?
    If anyone has any inclination to their actual process of generating the UMS scale please let me know!
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    (Original post by cowie)
    I completely understand the fact that there is a UMS scale at which raw marks are converted to reflecting overall student's performances on a paper. But is there any sort of algorithm to how they come to be?
    Is it something as simple as the top 10% get an an A* for example? Or do they work out what they assume and A and an E to be and then divide by 5 to get the difference between grades?
    If anyone has any inclination to their actual process of generating the UMS scale please let me know!
    I believe they mark all of the countries papers for a set exam first. They then look at the results and calculate the grade boundaries so that, from the people who took the paper, the top certain % of people get A*s As Bs etc.

    So the grade boundaries are set afterwards to ensure the correct percentage of people get the grades exam board wants them too.
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    That's why it's not bad if everyone does bad in an exam.... because if literally everyone did, then an A* would be something like 50% marks :P
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    UMS Calculator for AQA: http://www.aqa.org.uk/exams-administ...t-marks-to-ums

    Explanation about UMS in general: http://www.aqa.org.uk/exams-administ...orm-mark-scale

    It's basically a system that adjusts your raw marks in accordance to the difficulty of the paper. The adjusted marks (UMS) are then used to calculate your grade (e.g. 160/200 UMS for an A). As far as I know, with the exception of IB, the top mark(s) is/are not allocated on the basis of a proportion (say, A* being the top 5% of candidates or whatever).
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    I was told that there was a standard deviation type curve that they use to calculate it. If that's true, how would skewness affect grade boundaries?
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    (Original post by emerl98)
    I was told that there was a standard deviation type curve that they use to calculate it. If that's true, how would skewness affect grade boundaries?
    For AQA, and I imagine for the other exam boards as well, UMS is awarded almost proportionately to your raw mark, and often comes to a plateau/ grade cap where a raw percentage that is less than 100% will give you full UMS. It's not exactly linear, but the curve on the graph line is so small that it has a tiny effect on your UMS in reality (as long as you don't get like 15% raw marks or something stupid).

    Take a look at the UMS Calculator I linked above - put in some random subjects and dates, and then take a look at the graph it produces.
    For example: image
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    (Original post by JohnGreek)
    For AQA, and I imagine for the other exam boards as well, UMS is awarded almost proportionately to your raw mark, and often comes to a plateau/ grade cap where a raw percentage that is less than 100% will give you full UMS. It's not exactly linear, but the curve on the graph line is so small that it has a tiny effect on your UMS in reality (as long as you don't get like 15% raw marks or something stupid).

    Take a look at the UMS Calculator I linked above - put in some random subjects and dates, and then take a look at the graph it produces.
    For example: image
    I get the original idea of how UMS is calculated. But how do they decide the raw mark boundaries that contribute to a particular grade in a subject? I know that raw mark boundaries are calculated in relation to how the rest of the country. But what is the method used to do so?

    I heard the boundaries were calculated using a normal distribution curve. If so, then I assume that the mean mark would be a C grade. And how would skewness affect results?
 
 
 
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