MEDICINE - *RESULTS DAY 2016* - GCSE Results Discussion & Advice

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    RESULTS DAY 2016

    GCSE RESULTS FOR POTENTIAL MEDICAL SCHOOL APPLICANTS

    Today's the day that our Year 11's will be receiving their GCSE results. I hope you received the results you wanted and are celebrating accordingly!

    :banana:

    If you have come to the Medicine forum then we can assume that you are interested in applying to study medicine in the future. As such, you may be looking for advice on your results and what to do next. We ask that you read the information in this post and on the wiki before posting, as everything you need should be there:

    -> Medicine FAQ
    -> Medical school GCSE requirements

    Are my GCSE grades good enough?GCSEs play a role in your medicine application; no-one can deny that. However, the role that they play can vary greatly depending on where you apply. Some universities will want you to have excellent GCSEs, whilst others place far less emphasis on these results.To view current GCSE requirements, view this page.Please be aware that these requirements are for 2014 entry, and could change by the time you come to apply.


    What AS levels should I take?It is recommended that you take both biology and chemistry at AS level, as the majority of medical schools will ask that you complete chemistry to an 'A' grade at A2 level, with most also specifying that you complete biology to at least AS level.A third science subject is recommended, though not required by all, at AS level. See below for what subjects you could choose for this.

    For the current A level requirements, please see this page. As with the GCSE requirements, this information could potentially change by the time that you apply.


    What constitutes a science subject?Typically medical schools are talking about biology, chemistry, physics, maths (and further maths) when they talk about "science subjects". These can be further narrowed down to the "laboratory" or "experimental" sciences which are biology, chemistry and physics.


    Do I need to take A level Maths?Absolutely not. This is a very common misconception given either by poorly informed lay people or careers advisors. There is no medical school in the UK that explicitly states it is essential to have Maths at AS or A2 level to be eligible for medicine.

    Much confusion arises out of some medical schools listing acceptable combinations of science subjects by starting off with chemistry and then saying "and biology and/or maths and/or physics". This means one of the three subjects (bio/maths/physics) must be studied alongside Chemistry A-Level, but does not mean you have to take more than one of these.

    For the select few Cambridge colleges that do require "3 sciences", this could very well be Biology, Chemistry and Physics instead of the usual Biology, Chemistry and Maths. Studying Maths/Physics as your 3rd A2 subject will confer no advantage or disadvantage on your application to any other medical school.

    Some medical schools (notably, University College London) give preference to applicants with a "contrasting" (non-science) third A-Level.


    How can I strengthen my application?Work experience

    Work experience is vital when applying for Medicine. The admissions staff want to know that you have an insight into what it is you want to do from observational or hands-on experience, and that you can reflect on these experiences in your personal statement.

    We have a brilliant resource on work experience for you to read, which can be found here. Please read that page before asking any questions about work experience.

    The EPQ

    EPQ stands for Extended Project Qualification and is a stand-alone piece of work that is equivalent to an AS level. It is graded from A*-E. More and more medicine applicants are becoming interested in the EPQ and are deciding to do one to help their application.

    Whilst the EPQ will commonly not form part of your offer, it can prove beneficial to your application as it allows you to explore a topic through your own self-directed research and be able to talk about your topic in detail. This gives you something interesting to discuss at interview, as well as useful skills to reflect upon in your personal statement.

    If you decide to do an EPQ then you should realise that this should not take priority over your A level work, and once started should be completed. If you enter your EPQ on UCAS but later withdraw from the qualification, you will technically be altering the information with which you provided the universities to consider your application and this can (but rarely does) result in any offers being rescinded.


    Do I need to start revising for the UKCAT/BMAT?The short answer is no.

    There is plenty of time to revise for the UKCAT and/or BMAT from March onwards next year. You should use this time to concentrate on your AS levels and get used to the transition from GCSE.


    What about my personal statement?At this point in time you should be thinking about gaining experiences to form the content of your personal statement, but not writing it. When undertaking work experience, it is advised that you keep a diary or journal of your thoughts and observations (without any identifiable patient information) so that it is easier to remember what you did and how you felt at the time when you do come to write your personal statement in the summer after your AS exams.


    The information in this post should hopefully cover everything you need to know. If you have read this alongside the wiki and it still doesn't answer your question then feel free to ask on this thread and someone will try to help you.

    Well done on your results!
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    Post here for your GCSE grades advice.
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    (Original post by Beska)
    Post here for your GCSE grades advice.
    Hi, I have got an A in biology and chemistry, B in maths and physics. If I retake maths and get an A and do a level biology chemistry and maths could I still do medicine.
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    (Original post by Beska)
    RESULTS DAY 2016

    GCSE RESULTS FOR POTENTIAL MEDICAL SCHOOL APPLICANTS
    Hey, I thought Cambridge wants maths A Level? I may be mistaken.

    "AS and A Levels
    • Applicants must have AS or A Level passes in Chemistry and two of Biology/Human Biology, Physics, Mathematics. At least one pass must be at A Level.
    • Most applicants for Medicine at Cambridge have at least three science/mathematics A Levels and some Colleges require this and/or particular subjects. See individual College websites for details.
    Although some Colleges consider applicants offering only two science/mathematics subjects at A Level (or equivalent), please note that the success rate of such applicants is much lower.In the past three admissions rounds, 97 per cent of applicants for Medicine (A100) offered three or more science/mathematics A Levels and, of these, 26 per cent were successful in obtaining a place. Of the three per cent of applicants who offered only two science/mathematics A Levels, just nine per cent were successful in gaining a place. "
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    (Original post by 5h3bi)
    Hi, I have got an A in biology and chemistry, B in maths and physics. If I retake maths and get an A and do a level biology chemistry and maths could I still do medicine.
    Hi

    Well done on your grades.

    I wouldn't re-take GCSEs - it might cause trouble with some medical schools so I would check with them before resitting. Maths at a GCSE grade B is fine so I wouldn't take it at A-Level for the sake of it. Take biology, chemistry and another A-Level that you're most likely to get AAA with.
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    (Original post by bicks)
    Hey, I thought Cambridge wants maths A Level? I may be mistaken.

    "AS and A Levels
    • Applicants must have AS or A Level passes in Chemistry and two of Biology/Human Biology, Physics, Mathematics. At least one pass must be at A Level.
    • Most applicants for Medicine at Cambridge have at least three science/mathematics A Levels and some Colleges require this and/or particular subjects. See individual College websites for details.
    Although some Colleges consider applicants offering only two science/mathematics subjects at A Level (or equivalent), please note that the success rate of such applicants is much lower.In the past three admissions rounds, 97 per cent of applicants for Medicine (A100) offered three or more science/mathematics A Levels and, of these, 26 per cent were successful in obtaining a place. Of the three per cent of applicants who offered only two science/mathematics A Levels, just nine per cent were successful in gaining a place. "
    Hi

    Cambridge as a whole don't require a maths A-Level, only certain colleges which you can check for before you apply. The reason most people have 3 science A-Levels applying for Medicine (this is everywhere - not just Cambridge) is because we medics are a largely self-selecting bunch that like the sciences. The third A-Level doesn't need to be maths either - it can be (and commonly is) physics.
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    (Original post by bicks)
    Hey, I thought Cambridge wants maths A Level? I may be mistaken.

    "AS and A Levels
    • Applicants must have AS or A Level passes in Chemistry and two of Biology/Human Biology, Physics, Mathematics. At least one pass must be at A Level.
    • Most applicants for Medicine at Cambridge have at least three science/mathematics A Levels and some Colleges require this and/or particular subjects. See individual College websites for details.
    Although some Colleges consider applicants offering only two science/mathematics subjects at A Level (or equivalent), please note that the success rate of such applicants is much lower.In the past three admissions rounds, 97 per cent of applicants for Medicine (A100) offered three or more science/mathematics A Levels and, of these, 26 per cent were successful in obtaining a place. Of the three per cent of applicants who offered only two science/mathematics A Levels, just nine per cent were successful in gaining a place. "
    I only really know about Oxford, not Cambridge, but I'm reading their guidance in the same way as all other medical schools: chemistry, and then pick one from biology, physics and maths. The bottom bit of that quote is saying that 3% will pick one from that list to have two science subjects in total, but 97% of applicants will have chosen two, bringing their total science-tally up to three. So you could do chem, bio and physics and still come under that 97% figure.

    EDIT: But if you or anyone else are asking that question to try to get out of doing maths, the physics people from my sixth form repeatedly said that they would never do physics without doing maths. Incidentally, I also know someone who did medicine at Oxford without A-Level biology; it definitely doesn't have to be bio, chem and maths in the slightest.
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    (Original post by Beska)
    Hi

    Cambridge as a whole don't require a maths A-Level, only certain colleges which you can check for before you apply. The reason most people have 3 science A-Levels applying for Medicine (this is everywhere - not just Cambridge) is because we medics are a largely self-selecting bunch that like the sciences. The third A-Level doesn't need to be maths either - it can be (and commonly is) physics.
    Sorry, posted at the same time! ^_^
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    Maths: A*
    Bio: A*
    Chem: A*
    Physics: A (3 UMS of an A* so I'm gonna have that remarked)
    English Language: A*
    English Literature: B
    RS: A
    History: A
    Spanish: B
    Art: C
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    Not with that C in Art. If you cannot express a diagnosis to a patient through a variety of artful mediums just what use as a doctor are you?
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    (Original post by Beska)
    Hi
    The third A-Level doesn't need to be maths either - it can be (and commonly is) physics.
    (Original post by Lainathiel)
    I only really know about Oxford, not Cambridge, but I'm reading their guidance in the same way as all other medical schools: chemistry, and then pick one from biology, physics and maths. The bottom bit of that quote is saying that 3% will pick one from that list to have two science subjects in total, but 97% of applicants will have chosen two, bringing their total science-tally up to three. So you could do chem, bio and physics and still come under that 97% figure.

    EDIT: But if you or anyone else are asking that question to try to get out of doing maths, the physics people from my sixth form repeatedly said that they would never do physics without doing maths. Incidentally, I also know someone who did medicine at Oxford without A-Level biology; it definitely doesn't have to be bio, chem and maths in the slightest.
    Thanks a lot guys! Needed to know for my younger bro. It turns out he will take maths as his 3rd science paper as he thinks he prefers it to physics.
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    Maths - A*
    Chemistry - A*
    Additional Maths - B
    English Lit- B
    English Lang -C
    Biology - A
    Physics - A
    Geography - A
    Spanish - A
    RS - A
    French - B
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    (Original post by Yin-yanggggg)
    Maths - A*
    Chemistry - A*
    Additional Maths - B
    English Lit- B
    English Lang -C
    Biology - A
    Physics - A
    Geography - A
    Spanish - A
    RS - A
    French - B
    Almost definitely , to almost all universities A Levels are what really matters SO GCSEs dont mean much. However some really competitive medical schools like Cambridge might want Many A* at GCSE.
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    I got
    2 As (Geography and Further Add. science)
    5 b's (Core and Add. science, maths, citizenship and ICT)
    3 Cs (English lang. and Lit and French)

    Do I have any chance at all to enter medicine?
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    Hi, I just got my GCSE results today. I got 6 A*s, 2As but I got a D in music for a very legit reason- my teacher was off sick all throughout the course. I have work experience in an opticians and a pharmacy and I am currently volunteering in a hospital (which I have been doing for a month and plan to do so up until I start university.) I really want to study medicine in the future and was wondering if this D in music would stop me from getting into medical school. I'm so disheartened by this as it makes all the rest of my grades look bad too.

    Thanks for your replies.
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    Hi, I just recieved my GCSE results today and I got 6 A*s, 2As but I got a D in music, due to a legit reason- my teacher was off sick all throughout the course. So we didn't have a teacher. I have work experience in an opticians and a pharmacy and I am currently volunteering in a hospital (which I have been doing for a month and will continue up until I start university). I really would like to go into medicine and was wondering if this D in music would stop me from having a good chance. It really disheartened me as I worked really hard for these exams.

    Replies are much appreciated, thanks.
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    (Original post by charlotte243)
    So I'm in year 11 at the moment and I would really love to study medicine. When I first realised that it's what I want to do I sort of shied away from it, at the thought of not being good enough. I've heard about how competitive medicine is and that when applying a lot of universities take your GCSE's into account.
    Is it true that the majority of accepted medicine applicants have 6 of more A*'s??
    Are these grades good enough? (These are my predicted grades, apart from Biology)

    English Lit A/A*
    English Lang A/A*
    Maths A
    Geography A
    Japanese B
    Photography A*
    Dance A
    Physics B
    Chemistry A
    Biology A* (I have already taken this iGCSE)
    Alot of these posters are wrong, more universities then Oxbridge consider GCSE's as vital to choosing applicants. Keele, Cardiff, Liverpool, Birmingham just to name a few. Your GCSE's are good for normal standard but not compared to the typical medical applicant. So when choosing your Uni choices, make sure to go for ones that are less GCSE intensive (focusing on UKCAT, work experience etc).

    Best of luck
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    (Original post by It's_me.)
    Hi, I just recieved my GCSE results today and I got 6 A*s, 2As but I got a D in music, due to a legit reason- my teacher was off sick all throughout the course. So we didn't have a teacher. I have work experience in an opticians and a pharmacy and I am currently volunteering in a hospital (which I have been doing for a month and will continue up until I start university). I really would like to go into medicine and was wondering if this D in music would stop me from having a good chance. It really disheartened me as I worked really hard for these exams.

    Replies are much appreciated, thanks.
    The D in music will not sop you at all from doing medicine. All the medical schools I applied too last year only looked typically at my best 8 GCSE's, which for you leaves out the D in music. Alternatively, you could just leave it out on your UCAS application when you apply if your that worried, but please check with your teachers whether your allowed to do that!

    Best of luck
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    Hi
    I got
    8 a*
    3 a (maths, physics and German)
    I will remark get maths and German as they were right on the grade boundaries.
    Lots have people have told me to not even bother with Birmingham Uni or Oxford and that majority of Russel brick unis only take people with all a*s in maths and English.

    Is that true and can I get into Birmingham or Oxford with these GCSE's?
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    (Original post by Fakiha)
    Hi
    I got
    8 a*
    3 a (maths, physics and German)
    I will remark get maths and German as they were right on the grade boundaries.
    Lots have people have told me to not even bother with Birmingham Uni or Oxford and that majority of Russel brick unis only take people with all a*s in maths and English.

    Is that true and can I get into Birmingham or Oxford with these GCSE's?
    Russell group does not matter one bit in medicine, nor does the concept of prestige. You need to apply where you stand the best chance of getting in.

    The way it stands now, those grades would be very risky at Oxford, but great at just about everywhere else.
 
 
 
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