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Local slang watch

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    Does anyone else find that when talking to friends who live in different parts of the country, they have a whole different range of slang words which make it sound like they're talking a different language? :rolleyes: I've been catching up with an old friend who'd moved to London and he keeps calling me "posh girl" because I don't know the terms he uses. I just think we're both familiar with totally different slang terms. So I thought I'd post a thread for those terms you've heard people from other areas use, but don't understand! And if you like post any particularly unusual local slang of your own here then go for it.

    So, to start off, my friend called me "nang" and I have no idea what it means! Anyone?!
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    If I'm correct that means you are good.

    But slang is utterly ridiculous and I refuse to use it, if that makes me 'posh' then so be it
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    (Original post by AntiMagicMan)
    If I'm correct that means you are good.

    But slang is utterly ridiculous and I refuse to use it, if that makes me 'posh' then so be it
    If thats the way you want it 'r' kid I am sure ya gather will be very pleased with ya.

    PS I have no idea what nang means.
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    Those buffoons on the blazin' squad messageboard use it every 3rd word.

    ... I wasn't on the blazin' squad messageboard no-siree.
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    It's making me feel better than I'm not the only one who didn't know :rolleyes:

    According to http://www.peevish.co.uk/slang/n.htm:
    nang - Adj. Excellent, great. [London use]

    Spot on AntiMagicMan. So I guess I'll take it as a compliment...
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    nang is an old word. as in, i was using it in year 7, along with 'speng' and 'ming'
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    (Original post by fishpaste)
    Those buffoons on the blazin' squad messageboard use it every 3rd word.

    ... I wasn't on the blazin' squad messageboard no-siree.
    You do realise that this post is going to be archived for a veeeeeeeerrrrry long time.
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    Ey up, gadge, I just seen this proper mad as bewer throw a radgie coz some monkey hanger stole her stottie.

    Now I may have used all those terms regularly before, but I hope to god I've never actually used that many in the same sentence. And if anyone (not from Middlesbrough) can decipher that then fair play to you.
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    (Original post by stressedstudent)
    It's making me feel better than I'm not the only one who didn't know :rolleyes:

    According to http://www.peevish.co.uk/slang/n.htm:
    nang - Adj. Excellent, great. [London use]

    Spot on AntiMagicMan. So I guess I'll take it as a compliment...
    I do tend to pick these things up with everyone around me using them, but I'll be damned before I help proliferate their usage . But I guess I already have, oh well .
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    (Original post by goldenbarnes)
    Ey up, gadge, I just seen this proper mad as bewer throw a radgie coz some monkey hanger stole her stottie.

    Now I may have used all those terms regularly before, but I hope to god I've never actually used that many in the same sentence. And if anyone (not from Middlesbrough) can decipher that then fair play to you.
    If someone said that to me I would assume they had some sort of learning difficulty...
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    (Original post by Pegasus)
    If someone said that to me I would assume they had some sort of learning difficulty...

    BOOOOO hisss

    Believe it or not that slang's used regularly by most people on Teesside, although I would regularly myself only use the word 'gadge'. :cool:
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    I knew what nang meant, but I am exposed to London slang quite a lot!
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    I haven't heard "nang" since year nine.

    MB
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    Does anyone else use the word "grockle"? As in... "there goes another grockle" or "that grockle shop". (Not giving away the meaning just yet )
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    (Original post by musicboy)
    I haven't heard "nang" since year nine.

    MB
    Oh yea, I remember it came after the word "ming"

    MB
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    I've lived in London all my life and never heard the term "nang". And definitely not "grockle" :confused: .
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    Let's make a word up, proliferate it, and see how long until a stranger uses it in everyday conversation.

    How about "yerdy" ... somebody invent a meaning.
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    (Original post by Sarky)

    I've lived in London all my life and never heard the term "nang". And definitely not "grockle" :confused: .
    I think grockle is just a westcountry thing, but I just want to see if anyone else has heard of it
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    (Original post by blissy)
    I think grockle is just a westcountry thing, but I just want to see if anyone else has heard of it

    Ah ok. (Shuts up and goes back to her corner)
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    Me and my mates have invented a whole varity of slang words for us to use.
 
 
 
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