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Subject choice appropriate for Economics at Oxbridge? Watch

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    After much deliberation, I have settled into Year 12 with the decision to study Physics, Maths, Further Maths and Medival and Modern History at A-level, as well as an EPQ. For the linear qualifications I am predicted A A* A* A* respectively; I have not received a predicted grade for my EPQ.

    I chose to study A-level Physics instead of Economics. I love Physics much more so than the rather bland syllabus of A-level Economics - I tried the course for the first two weeks of term and analysed the syllabus. Oxbridge only specifies an A in Maths, which I am certain I will at the very least achieve.

    As for my EPQ, I am doing a dissertation on the state of the Venezuelan economy; something I thought would be really interesting to discuss at an interview for Economics. Theoretically, should this and much more further reading into economics and the economy provide me grounds to be a competitive applicant at Oxbridge? Currently the course at Cambridge has a 1 in 7 admission rate, but I also have 9A* (inc. 3 9s) and 1 A at GCSE.

    Finally, based on your own preference would you suggest the Economics course at Cambridge or Oxford? I love maths as it may be apparent in my options, but also love essay writing and constructing an argument, etc.

    I appreciate any kind of constructive feedback in advance
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    damnn those are some impressive stats
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    If you can take Economics A-Level but decide not to, do you even really like economics?
    Maths, FM, Physics, Econ is the ideal choice.
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    (Original post by CandidateZero)
    After much deliberation, I have settled into Year 12 with the decision to study Physics, Maths, Further Maths and Medival and Modern History at A-level, as well as an EPQ. For the linear qualifications I am predicted A A* A* A* respectively; I have not received a predicted grade for my EPQ.

    I chose to study A-level Physics instead of Economics. I love Physics much more so than the rather bland syllabus of A-level Economics - I tried the course for the first two weeks of term and analysed the syllabus. Oxbridge only specifies an A in Maths, which I am certain I will at the very least achieve.

    As for my EPQ, I am doing a dissertation on the state of the Venezuelan economy; something I thought would be really interesting to discuss at an interview for Economics. Theoretically, should this and much more further reading into economics and the economy provide me grounds to be a competitive applicant at Oxbridge? Currently the course at Cambridge has a 1 in 7 admission rate, but I also have 9A* (inc. 3 9s) and 1 A at GCSE.

    Finally, based on your own preference would you suggest the Economics course at Cambridge or Oxford? I love maths as it may be apparent in my options, but also love essay writing and constructing an argument, etc.

    I appreciate any kind of constructive feedback in advance
    Which course at Oxford? They don't have a straight Economics course.

    Physics is absolutely fine instead of Economics A-level.

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    Hello, I think your A Level choices should be fine, since you show that you have strong mathematical skills and demonstrate your ability to write essays. Furthermore the EPQ shows your interest in economics and you should be fine with extra reading. But bear in mind that they might ask you why you didn't do economics A Level (or they might not since not all schools teach it). Also bear in mind you're doing a lot of extra reading (that might have been included in an economics A Level) along with 4.5 other A Levels so that's quite a bit of work.

    I heard the Cambridge course for economics involves a lot of maths. As for Oxford they don't offer pure economics, but offer the following combinations for economics:



    I would recommend looking at the information on their websites and finding out what students think to find out more. Also, open days.

    Anyway, all the best for your application.
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    (Original post by TheMightyBadger)
    If you can take Economics A-Level but decide not to, do you even really like economics?
    Maths, FM, Physics, Econ is the ideal choice.
    I knew this question would come up! Haha. No, it’s not that I didn’t like Economics as a subject, but rather that the prospect of doing Business Studies-y content for the next two years sounds menial and not half boring. There is some maths and complex theory involved, given, but I’d much rather be challenged by a much more interesting subject (at this level) like Physics. At university is by all accounts where economics as a social science becomes much more interesting. Albeit I should have made this clearer in my post. Thanks for the feedback.
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Which course at Oxford? They don't have a straight Economics course.

    Physics is absolutely fine instead of Economics A-level.

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    Cheers for the feedback. Again, I should have made this clearer in my post, but it would likely be Economics and Management at Oxford, which to the best of my knowledge is a less competitive course than standalone Economics at Cambridge. Which of the two, hypothetically speaking, would be the more ‘relevant’ degree for an internship in investment banking if I had the choice to do either one? I appreciate the vagueness of the question and realise that as to which course is better depends on the circumstance; are both equally valued? Many thanks.
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    (Original post by hannah00)
    damnn those are some impressive stats
    Thank you! They didn’t come without hard work, however.
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    (Original post by CandidateZero)
    Cheers for the feedback. Again, I should have made this clearer in my post, but it would likely be Economics and Management at Oxford, which to the best of my knowledge is a less competitive course than standalone Economics at Cambridge. Which of the two, hypothetically speaking, would be the more ‘relevant’ degree for an internship in investment banking if I had the choice to do either one? I appreciate the vagueness of the question and realise that as to which course is better depends on the circumstance; are both equally valued? Many thanks.
    For IB, degree doesn't matter but the fact that if you get in to Oxford or Cambridge, then you're in a really good position.

    You have very good grades so I'm sure, with your predicted grades also, you should go a long way through the process at least. What happens when they question 'why didn't you take economics" when your school offered it? I think that's the only minor issue, but other than that, you're all good imo.
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    (Original post by Ze Witcher)
    For IB, degree doesn't matter but the fact that if you get in to Oxford or Cambridge, then you're in a really good position.

    You have very good grades so I'm sure, with your predicted grades also, you should go a long way through the process at least. What happens when they question 'why didn't you take economics" when your school offered it? I think that's the only minor issue, but other than that, you're all good imo.
    Very good to hear; thank you. I realise it may be something I am asked, so will have to ‘rehearse’ a response. Many thanks for the feedback.
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    (Original post by CandidateZero)
    Cheers for the feedback. Again, I should have made this clearer in my post, but it would likely be Economics and Management at Oxford, which to the best of my knowledge is a less competitive course than standalone Economics at Cambridge. Which of the two, hypothetically speaking, would be the more ‘relevant’ degree for an internship in investment banking if I had the choice to do either one? I appreciate the vagueness of the question and realise that as to which course is better depends on the circumstance; are both equally valued? Many thanks.
    E&M has one of the lowest offer rates of any course at Oxford: 7%

    That's also lower than Economics at Cambridge (which also is one of the most competitive courses at Cambridge).

    However, you need to settle on the *course* you most want to do. Not the one with the "best" admissions stats.

    Regarding IB, it makes zero difference.

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    (Original post by CandidateZero)
    After much deliberation, I have settled into Year 12 with the decision to study Physics, Maths, Further Maths and Medival and Modern History at A-level, as well as an EPQ. For the linear qualifications I am predicted A A* A* A* respectively; I have not received a predicted grade for my EPQ.

    I chose to study A-level Physics instead of Economics. I love Physics much more so than the rather bland syllabus of A-level Economics - I tried the course for the first two weeks of term and analysed the syllabus. Oxbridge only specifies an A in Maths, which I am certain I will at the very least achieve.

    As for my EPQ, I am doing a dissertation on the state of the Venezuelan economy; something I thought would be really interesting to discuss at an interview for Economics. Theoretically, should this and much more further reading into economics and the economy provide me grounds to be a competitive applicant at Oxbridge? Currently the course at Cambridge has a 1 in 7 admission rate, but I also have 9A* (inc. 3 9s) and 1 A at GCSE.

    Finally, based on your own preference would you suggest the Economics course at Cambridge or Oxford? I love maths as it may be apparent in my options, but also love essay writing and constructing an argument, etc.

    I appreciate any kind of constructive feedback in advance
    I understand the appeal of Oxbridge; and the prestige of attending them. However, the London School of Economics is likely to be a 'better' university for Economics; simply due to their specialism, with graduates paid the most of all universities, however, they require an A* in Mathematics.

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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    E&M has one of the lowest offer rates of any course at Oxford: 7%

    That's also lower than Economics at Cambridge (which also is one of the most competitive courses at Cambridge).

    However, you need to settle on the *course* you most want to do. Not the one with the "best" admissions stats.

    Regarding IB, it makes zero difference.

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    Many thanks for the advice and sorry for the misinformation.Very interesting about the rate of admissions for E&M at Oxford, really. I guess that pure Economics at Cambridge offers the best chance of admission.

    I will definitely look into each individual course and try to put the admissions rate to the back of my mind.
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    (Original post by ns_2)
    I understand the appeal of Oxbridge; and the prestige of attending them. However, the London School of Economics is likely to be a 'better' university for Economics; simply due to their specialism, with graduates paid the most of all universities, however, they require an A* in Mathematics.

    They're paid the most because they're all wanna-be-bankers.
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    (Original post by ns_2)
    I understand the appeal of Oxbridge; and the prestige of attending them. However, the London School of Economics is likely to be a 'better' university for Economics; simply due to their specialism, with graduates paid the most of all universities, however, they require an A* in Mathematics.

    You might think so, but you'd be wrong...

    Subject: Economics
    Median earnings 5 years after graduating
    Top 10 universities:
    Name:  Screen Shot 2017-09-23 at 20.32.30.jpg
Views: 20
Size:  81.2 KB

    Source: https://www.gov.uk/government/statis...-by-university
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Economics
    Median earnings 5 years after graduating
    Top 10 universities:
    Name:  Screen Shot 2017-09-23 at 20.32.30.jpg
Views: 20
Size:  81.2 KB

    Source: https://www.gov.uk/government/statis...-by-university
    Thank you for partially proving my point. As you will see, 5 years after graduation, LSE is already above Oxford.

    However, if you see the link in my previous point, 10 years after graduation, LSE surpasses both Oxford and Cambridge.

    Furthermore, see the following source: https://www.ifs.org.uk/uploads/publi...wps/wp1606.pdf
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    (Original post by ns_2)
    Thank you for partially proving my point. As you will see, 5 years after graduation, LSE is already above Oxford.

    However, if you see the link in my previous point, 10 years after graduation, LSE surpasses both Oxford and Cambridge.
    I would expect that LSE graduates are more likely to be working in London.
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    (Original post by RogerOxon)
    I would expect that LSE graduates are more likely to be working in London.
    Or even internationally... regardless, LSE is the best option for Economics (if possible)
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    (Original post by ns_2)
    Thank you for partially proving my point. As you will see, 5 years after graduation, LSE is already above Oxford.

    However, if you see the link in my previous point, 10 years after graduation, LSE surpasses both Oxford and Cambridge.

    Furthermore, see the following source: https://www.ifs.org.uk/uploads/publi...wps/wp1606.pdf
    You can't use generalist data to prove a subject-specific point. The IFS data doesn't analyse out the institutions by subjects.

    (Although I agree Cambridge is better than the other place )
 
 
 
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