Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by rickyrossman)
    Is pathology mainly examining dead bodies? I don't think I know many people who go to med school with the dream of becoming a pathologists haha
    Haha post-mortems is part of it, but not really why I liked the idea of it.

    In my naivety, I felt that pathology was more 'solid' in diagnosis than most other specialities, so I won't have to worry as much trying to juggle multiple differential diagnosis because no presentation is completely by the book. Being able to put together microscopic and macroscopic observations to gain a better idea of the body was fascinating. I also didn't know if I'd be more clinical or lab-orientated, and it felt like a good mix.

    (And young me was terrified of talking to people, and pathology always hit me as quite a lonely specialty :embarrassed:)
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by HateOCR)
    The reason i said this is because when young adults, adults and the elderly are sick and are in need of care they co-operate better than young children do. I think children will just make the job harder. Im not a doctor yet btw just posting my opinion now but i might come back at this thread in a few years time and laugh at this comment in between my job breaks as a paediatrician 😂
    Wait till you see a drunk/high young adult or a very confused elderly patient that just won't cooperate. At least children have parents who can consent for them and with confused adults you might need to go into (a bit shady IMO) area of assessing capacity and taking it from there.

    (Original post by paniking_and_not_revising)
    A&E - don't have to see patients for too long but it's like a war zone in A&E where the main goal is to survive instead of treating patients
    Dermatology - easy lifestyle but I don't know if I'd ever care enough to turn up to work
    Radiology - you don't have to see patients and it's not as dull as pathology but I'd probably keep falling asleep in the dark so i dunno really
    Obs & Gynae - mix of everything but obs especially is always going to be risky with emergency patients and I don't really want to deal with lawsuits
    Anaes/ICU - lots of sleeping patients who can't talk back to you but I can't do crosswords and stuff. Cons: surgeons

    Specialties I definitely don't want to do:
    Surgery - I'd either pass out from standing still from so long or I'd fall onto the patient. Cons: surgeons
    Psych - depressing as hell
    Paeds - if you think the kids are bad, wait till you meet the parents
    That's not true. Most parents are terrified by having kids in hospital and if you don't sit them down and explain what is going on, no wonder they won't want to cooperate. It's all about communication. If you're **** at that, the parents will be a nightmare for you.

    (Original post by rickyrossman)
    Isn't A&E supposed to be one of the most stressful specialities? I imagine there's a lot of doom and gloom involved. E.g. people being rushed into hospital with motorcycle accidents and other horrendous things.


    I've watched some documentaries about foundation year doctors and their work seems to be very rushed. As in they don't spend much time with their patients and they have lots of paper work to do.



    That sounds horrible. But its a bit disappointing because endocrinology is one of the things that got me interested in medicine. I thought endocrinologists deal with people who have hormone problems and diabetes. E.g. diabetes and hypogonadism. I find the latter pretty interesting, especially on how it influences behaviour in men. Maybe urologists would deal with the latter more than endocrinologists, idk really.[/QUOTE]
    Every person is different and just because Democracy doesn't enjoy endocrinology doesn't mean you won't!
    I absolutely 100% love obs & gynae, but have friends who barely survived the placement and would never want to come back again.



    (Original post by rickyrossman)
    Obgyn looks like a difficult speciality. But I always wonder if there will be some women who won't want to see a male gynaecologist. Thats what mainly puts me off it.
    Majority of women don't care. If you are a male medical student then yeah, it might happen, but most women don't care about the gender of their doctor.

    In Poland for example, women prefer to see a male gynaecologist as apparently they are deemed better. It's mainly young girls who go to female doctors there and most of them "swap" to male doctors once they grow up
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by rickyrossman)
    Is pathology mainly examining dead bodies? I don't think I know many people who go to med school with the dream of becoming a pathologists haha
    Post-mortems are actually a relatively small part of what histopathologists do, and not all histopathologists do them nowadays anyway.

    Most histopathology work involves microscopic examination of tissue specimens to identify pathological changes e.g. inflammation, cancer etc. The histopathologist then writes a report based on what they see which goes back to the team looking after the patient. They also take part in multi-disciplinary team meetings to co-ordinate treatment for cancer patients and so on.

    In the future histopathology will involve a lot more use of molecular techniques for diagnosis as opposed to physically looking down a microscope.

    That sounds horrible. But its a bit disappointing because endocrinology is one of the things that got me interested in medicine. I thought endocrinologists deal with people who have hormone problems and diabetes. E.g. diabetes and hypogonadism. I find the latter pretty interesting, especially on how it influences behaviour in men. Maybe urologists would deal with the latter more than endocrinologists, idk really.
    They do - endocrinology consultants will definitely see patients with various hormonal disorders in clinic including rarer conditions sometimes. But these patients are generally stable and don't usually need to be inpatients because of their endocrine disorder. So the inpatient work is usually the general care of adult medical patients with little to no pure endocrinology involved (diabetes excluded).

    I think chemical pathology is a similar specialty to endocrinology with interesting and rare conditions underpinned by biochemistry, but without the ward stuff.

    Urologists definitely won't be getting involved in treating medical conditions :p:
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    :yep: Went into medical with an interest in Psychology, and had Psychology as a back-up if I didn't get in.

    All through medical school I maintained my interest in Psychiatry through conversations with doctors at various levels, conferences, events, extracurricular placements, elective etc.

    Now as an FY1 I have had a chance to shadow both consultants and junior doctors in Psychiatry to get an idea of what it's like at different levels of the hierarchy. My interest in a career in Psychiatry is as strong as ever, and has never really wavered since I started medical school. I did ( and still do) try to keep an open mind with other specialities, and there are some which I do find interesting, but I always fall back to Psych.

    So it is possible!
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Nottie)

    That's not true. Most parents are terrified by having kids in hospital and if you don't sit them down and explain what is going on, no wonder they won't want to cooperate. It's all about communication. If you're **** at that, the parents will be a nightmare for you.
    Those parents aren't what scares me off paediatrics.

    It's the parents who you wouldn't trust with a chinchilla let alone an actual child.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by paniking_and_not_revising)
    Those parents aren't what scares me off paediatrics.

    It's the parents who you wouldn't trust with a chinchilla let alone an actual child.
    Ahh yeah that type. Haven't really met much of them in paediatrics, but I've met few pregnant women that are straight crazy
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by rickyrossman)
    Obgyn looks like a difficult speciality. But I always wonder if there will be some women who won't want to see a male gynaecologist. Thats what mainly puts me off it.
    At the junior trainee level yes and that can be very frustrating for someone actually trying to take an interest in the speciality. Generally though if you're going to be sorting out their problems i.e. actually doing their surgery or delivering their baby then they don't mind. I've never seen someone refuse to see a male registrar, let alone consultant.
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by Nottie)
    Ahh yeah that type. Haven't really met much of them in paediatrics...
    I suspect if you look a bit closer you will see it. The scariest for me are when the 4/5 year old kid says "I want x". Mother: "No you can't have x" "Give me x now" *physically attacks mother* "Oh ok you can have x". Literally teaching your kid from the age of 4 that violence is how to get what you want. And that kind of thing is not a one off - so many mothers reward their kid if they behave badly including violently.

    I think the stigma associated with asking for help as a parent is one of the greatest tragedies of our society. Parenting classes, even if they are simply 'reward your kid for good things, punish them for bad, NOT THE OPPOSITE' on repeat for an hour, should be offered on the NHS,
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by Nottie)
    Ahh yeah that type. Haven't really met much of them in paediatrics...
    I suspect if you look a bit closer you will see it. The scariest for me are when the 4/5 year old kid says "I want x". Mother: "No you can't have x" "Give me x now" *physically attacks mother* "Oh ok you can have x". Literally teaching your kid from the age of 4 that violence is how to get what you want. And that kind of thing is not a one off - so many mothers reward their kid if they behave badly including violently.

    I think the stigma associated with asking for help as a parent is one of the greatest tragedies of our society. Parenting classes, even if they are simply 'reward your kid for good things, punish them for bad, NOT THE OPPOSITE' on repeat for an hour, should be offered on the NHS,
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nexttime)
    I suspect if you look a bit closer you will see it. The scariest for me are when the 4/5 year old kid says "I want x". Mother: "No you can't have x" "Give me x now" *physically attacks mother* "Oh ok you can have x". Literally teaching your kid from the age of 4 that violence is how to get what you want. And that kind of thing is not a one off - so many mothers reward their kid if they behave badly including violently.

    I think the stigma associated with asking for help as a parent is one of the greatest tragedies of our society. Parenting classes, even if they are simply 'reward your kid for good things, punish them for bad, NOT THE OPPOSITE' on repeat for an hour, should be offered on the NHS,
    Aren't the "123 Magic" courses for ADHD and other autism related parenting courses offered on NHS? I've never really looked into it, but I assumed that if it's part of the management plan then it would be available for free...
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nexttime)
    I suspect if you look a bit closer you will see it. The scariest for me are when the 4/5 year old kid says "I want x". Mother: "No you can't have x" "Give me x now" *physically attacks mother* "Oh ok you can have x". Literally teaching your kid from the age of 4 that violence is how to get what you want. And that kind of thing is not a one off - so many mothers reward their kid if they behave badly including violently.

    I think the stigma associated with asking for help as a parent is one of the greatest tragedies of our society. Parenting classes, even if they are simply 'reward your kid for good things, punish them for bad, NOT THE OPPOSITE' on repeat for an hour, should be offered on the NHS,
    this is my personal favourite I once overheard

    *child with a raging fever*
    parent: the fever won't go down.
    dr: did you give calpol?
    parent: no
    dr: why not?
    parent: didn't know what to do
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Study Helper
    (Original post by Blazingphoenix)
    I started chasing medicine wanting to go into pathology because I watched too much CSI

    Did some work experience and added GP and A&E to my interests.

    Went into med school. At the moment put off by pathology (so interesting, but I nearly threw up because of the smell :sick: so I'll need to build a better stomach for it) and psych (I just don't know how I'll deal because I keep thinking I have symptoms while I'm being taught them), still interested by GP and A&E, added urology, anaesthetics and radiology to interests.

    But I'm only first year, so we'll see what happens.

    If you do want to find out more about pathology, then sign up to this: https://www.pathsoc.org/index.php/me...er-school-2018

    It's free to attend, including a hotel stay for the night and drinks + dinner for the night (also breakfast and lunch etc). Just need to pay for train tickets!
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    My idea of what I wanted to do changed over time. I imagined paediatrics for a long time, until I actually did the placement in med school. And though it was a really great placement, I just don't think I have the disposition to handle it long term. Then I thought respiratory, or GP or A&E. One by one I've had to rule out a specialty. But I've come to a point more than half way through FY2 where I don't even think I'll choose one. I'm taking a break so I'm glad I don't have to make a decision yet.

    Some people drop out of the womb screaming surgeon! But it's ok if you don't know now. Doing placements in medical school and through foundation years will give you a better sense of direction. Just make sure to use an opportunity in each placement to get as much experience as you can. Unfortunately sometimes it's the people that put you off a certain specialty rather than the actual specialty so be wary of that.

    And it's true sometimes you have to base your decisions based on the type of lifestyle you want to have. I like some parts of A&E but the shifts are brutal!
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MedicZd)
    My idea of what I wanted to do changed over time. I imagined paediatrics for a long time, until I actually did the placement in med school. And though it was a really great placement, I just don't think I have the disposition to handle it long term. Then I thought respiratory, or GP or A&E. One by one I've had to rule out a specialty. But I've come to a point more than half way through FY2 where I don't even think I'll choose one. I'm taking a break so I'm glad I don't have to make a decision yet.

    Some people drop out of the womb screaming surgeon! But it's ok if you don't know now. Doing placements in medical school and through foundation years will give you a better sense of direction. Just make sure to use an opportunity in each placement to get as much experience as you can. Unfortunately sometimes it's the people that put you off a certain specialty rather than the actual specialty so be wary of that.

    And it's true sometimes you have to base your decisions based on the type of lifestyle you want to have. I like some parts of A&E but the shifts are brutal!
    How do they work? Do you do a set of days and then a set of nights or like one day, a night, a late, early, day...?
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by paniking_and_not_revising)
    How do they work? Do you do a set of days and then a set of nights or like one day, a night, a late, early, day...?
    I think it is all hospital dependent. At my trust we have a 10+ week timetable with a different range of shifts. I start on whatever week (I happened to start on 2) and then follow it through.

    There's a different combination of shifts: early morning, midday and afternoon shifts and then there's nights. similar shifts are usually banded together in 4's (but not always). I might get 4 early morning shifts Monday to Thursday. Have Friday off, then have 2 afternoon shifts Saturday and Sunday.
    Each week is a different combination, so you have to CHECK the rota all the time.

    Nights are either Monday to Thursday or Friday to Sunday.

    I hope that makes sense
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by paniking_and_not_revising)
    How do they work? Do you do a set of days and then a set of nights or like one day, a night, a late, early, day...?
    A&E and paeds are notorious for terrible rotas, with rapid cycling earlies, days lates, nights. Normally there is an underlying structure based on blocks of 3 or 4, but it can get complicated and sometimes you're doing 1 day of something next day something else, and the combined jetlag and fatigue means that you are really working far longer than the supposed 48 maximum! Its also provably bad for your health, somewhat ironically!

    Escaping that has become a key priority for my future career, especially since they cut the wages for out of hours and increased them for in-hours!
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: March 8, 2018

1,134

students online now

800,000+

Exam discussions

Find your exam discussion here

Poll
Should universities take a stronger line on drugs?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.